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PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
She hath prevented me. Here, Signior Tranio,
This bird you aimed at, though you hit her not.—
Therefore a health to all that shot and missed.
TRANIO
Oh, sir, Lucentio slipped me like his greyhound,
Which runs himself and catches for his master.
PETRUCHIO
A good swift simile, but something currish.
TRANIO
‘Tis well, sir, that you hunted for yourself.
‘Tis thought your deer does hold you at a bay.

DUTCH:
TRANIO
O heer, ‘k was voor Lucentio als een windhond,
Die dapper loopt en voor zijn meester vangt.
PETRUCCIO
Een vlugge vergelijking, maar wat hondsch.


MORE:
Prevent=Forestall
Health=A toast to
Slipped=Unleashed
Swift=Quick-witted
Currish=Dog-like; malicious
Hold you at bay=Make a stand agaisnt
Compleat:
To prevent=Voorkomen, eerstkomen; afkeeren; verhoeden
To slip a dog=Een hond los laaten
Currish=Hondsch, kwaadaardig

Burgersdijk notes:
Men meent, uw hinde loopt u wel bek-af. In ‘t Engelsch: ‘t Is thought your deer does hold you at a bay. Een woordspeling met deer, hinde, en dear, dierbare, liefjen.

Topics: rivalry, failure

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Marcus
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Princes, that strive by factions and by friends
Ambitiously for rule and empery,
Know that the people of Rome, for whom we stand
A special party, have, by common voice,
In election for the Roman empery,
Chosen Andronicus, surnamed Pius
For many good and great deserts to Rome:
A nobler man, a braver warrior,
Lives not this day within the city walls:
He by the senate is accited home
From weary wars against the barbarous Goths;
That, with his sons, a terror to our foes,
Hath yoked a nation strong, trained up in arms.
Ten years are spent since first he undertook
This cause of Rome and chastised with arms
Our enemies’ pride: five times he hath returned
Bleeding to Rome, bearing his valiant sons
In coffins from the field;
And now at last, laden with horror’s spoils,
Returns the good Andronicus to Rome,
Renowned Titus, flourishing in arms.
Let us entreat, by honour of his name,
Whom worthily you would have now succeed.
And in the Capitol and senate’s right,
Whom you pretend to honour and adore,
That you withdraw you and abate your strength;
Dismiss your followers and, as suitors should,
Plead your deserts in peace and humbleness

DUTCH:
Een eed’ler man, een kloeker krijgsheld leeft
In de’ omtrek van Oud-Rome’s wallen niet.

MORE:
Empery=Office of emperor
For whom we stand a special party=Whose interests we represent
Common voice=Unanimous vote
Chosen=Nominated
Deserts to=Meriting reward
Accited=summoned
Yoked=Subdued
Up in arms=Angry, rebellious, protesting
Compleat:
To stand in defence of a thing=Iets voorstaan
Common=Gemeen, gewoonlyk
Voice=Stem. A casting voice=Een doordringende stem
Yoke=Een juk; (yoke of bondage) Het juk der dienstbaarheid
To stoop onder the yoke=Onder ‘t juk buigenCompleat:
Up in arms =In de wapenen zyn

Topics: ambition, respect, leadership, rivalry

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Diomedes
CONTEXT:
PARIS
And tell me, noble Diomed, faith, tell me true,
Even in the soul of sound good-fellowship,
Who, in your thoughts, merits fair Helen best,
Myself or Menelaus?
DIOMEDES
Both alike:
He merits well to have her, that doth seek her,
Not making any scruple of her soilure,
With such a hell of pain and world of charge,
And you as well to keep her, that defend her,
Not palating the taste of her dishonour,
With such a costly loss of wealth and friends:
He, like a puling cuckold, would drink up
The lees and dregs of a flat tamed piece;
You, like a lecher, out of whorish loins
Are pleased to breed out your inheritors:
Both merits poised, each weighs nor less nor more;
But he as he, the heavier for a whore.
PARIS
You are too bitter to your countrywoman.

DUTCH:
U beider waarde
Weegt even zwaar, of weegt er een iets meer,
Dan drukt de lichtekooi zijn schaal iets neer.

MORE:
Merits=Deserves
Scruple=Very small unit of weight
Hold well=Esteem
Poised=Weighed
Soilure=Stain
Lees=Sediment
Compleat:
Merit=Verdienste
Scruple=Een gewigtje van xx greinen
Poised=Gewoogen, gewikt; evenwigtig
To soil=Bezoedelen, vuyl maaken, bevlekken
Lees=Droessem, grondsop

Topics: merit, conflict, rivalry

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Tyrrel
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD
Dar’st thou resolve to kill a friend of mine?
TYRREL
Please you. But I had rather kill two enemies.
KING RICHARD
Why then, thou hast it. Two deep enemies,
Foes to my rest, and my sweet sleep’s disturbers,
Are they that I would have thee deal upon.
Tyrrel, I mean those bastards in the Tower.
TYRREL
Let me have open means to come to them,
And soon I’ll rid you from the fear of them.
KING RICHARD
Thou sing’st sweet music. Hark, come hither, Tyrrel.

DUTCH:
KONING RICHARD
Sloegt gij wel een van mijne vrienden dood?
TYRREL
Als ‘t u behaagt; twee vijanden nog liever.

MORE:
Please you=If it please you
Open=Free
Compleat:
When you please=Als ‘t u belieft

Topics: rivalry, friendship

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Hortensio
CONTEXT:
GREMIO
I cannot tell. But I had as lief take her dowry with
this condition: to be whipped at the high cross every
morning.
HORTENSIO
Faith, as you say, there’s small choice in rotten
apples. But come, since this bar in law makes us
friends, it shall be so far forth friendly maintained
till by helping Baptista’s eldest daughter to a husband
we set his youngest free for a husband, and then have to
’t afresh. Sweet Bianca! Happy man be his dole! He that
runs fastest gets the ring. How say you, Signior
Gremio?
GREMIO
I am agreed, and would I had given him the best horse
in Padua to begin his wooing that would thoroughly woo
her, wed her, and bed her, and rid the house of her!
Come on.

DUTCH:
Die ‘t gelukkigst is, brengt de bruid thuis. Wie ‘t beste paard berijdt, steekt den ring.

MORE:
Proverb: There is a small choice in rotten apples (1594)
Proverb: Happy man happy dole (be his dole)
Proverb: He that hops best (runs fases) gets the ring

As lief=As happily
Bar in law=Legal obstacle
Afresh=Anew
Compleat:
I had as lief=Ik wilde al zo lief
Bar=Een dwarsboom, draaiboom, sluytboom, boom, hinderpaal, diefeyzer, traali, beletsel

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, rivalry, friendship

PLAY: Antony and Cleopatra
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Pompey
CONTEXT:
POMPEY
I could have given less matter
A better ear.—Menas, I did not think
This amorous surfeiter would have donned his helm
For such a petty war. His soldiership
Is twice the other twain. But let us rear
The higher our opinion, that our stirring
Can from the lap of Egypt’s widow pluck
The ne’er lust-wearied Antony.
MENAS
I cannot hope
Caesar and Antony shall well greet together.
His wife that’s dead did trespasses to Caesar.
His brother warred upon him, although, I think,
Not moved by Antony.
POMPEY
I know not, Menas,
How lesser enmities may give way to greater.
Were ’t not that we stand up against them all,
’Twere pregnant they should square between themselves,
For they have entertained cause enough
To draw their swords. But how the fear of us
May cement their divisions and bind up
The petty difference, we yet not know.
Be ’t as our gods will have ’t. It only stands
Our lives upon to use our strongest hands.
Come, Menas.

DUTCH:
Iets min belangrijks
Waar’ beter welkom. — Menas, ik dacht nooit
Dat zulk een nietige oorlog den wellust’ling
De wapens zou doen grijpen; zijne krijgskunst
Is dubbel die der and’re twee.

MORE:
Proverb: The greater grief (sorrow) drives out the less

Surfeiter=Reveller
Rear=Raise
Did trespasses to=Offended against
Moved=Prompted
Pregnant=Probable, clear, evident
Square=Fight
Entertained=Maintained
Cement=Join
Compleat:
To surfeit=Ergens zat van worden; zich overlaaden
Trespass=Overtreeden, zondigen
Moved=Bewoogen, verroerd, ontroerd
Pregnant=Krachtig, dringend, naadrukkelyk
Entertain=Onthaalen, huysvesten, plaats vergunnen
To cement=Dicht t’zamenvoegen, vastgroeijen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, conflict, rivalry

PLAY: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Theseus
CONTEXT:
THESEUS
I pray you all, stand up.
I know you two are rival enemies.
How comes this gentle concord in the world,
That hatred is so far from jealousy
To sleep by hate and fear no enmity?
LYSANDER
My lord, I shall reply amazèdly,
Half sleep, half waking. But as yet, I swear,
I cannot truly say how I came here.
But as I think—for truly would I speak,
And now do I bethink me, so it is—
I came with Hermia hither. Our intent
Was to be gone from Athens, where we might,
Without the peril of the Athenian law—

DUTCH:
Van waar die lieflijke eendracht zoo op eens,
Dat vrij van argwaan haat bij haat zich vlijt,
En ijverzucht haar vijand ducht noch mijdt.

MORE:
Jealousy=Distrust
Where=To where
Without=Beyond
Amazèdly=In confusion
Where we might=Wherever we can
Peril=Threat, risk
Compleat:
Jealousy=Belgzucht, naayver, argwaan, volgyver, minnenyd, achterdocht
Without=Buyten
Amazed=Ontzet, verbaasd, ontsteld
Amazedly=Verbaasdelyk
Peril=Gevaar, perykel, nood

Topics: rivalry, envy, resolution, trust

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Norfolk
CONTEXT:
NORFOLK
(…) Then you lost
The view of earthly glory: men might say,
Till this time pomp was single, but now married
To one above itself. Each following day
Became the next day’s master, till the last
Made former wonders its. To-day the French,
All clinquant, all in gold, like heathen gods,
Shone down the English; and, to-morrow, they
Made Britain India: every man that stood
Show’d like a mine. Their dwarfish pages were
As cherubins, all guilt: the madams too,
Not used to toil, did almost sweat to bear
The pride upon them, that their very labour
Was to them as a painting: now this masque
Was cried incomparable; and the ensuing night
Made it a fool and beggar. The two kings,
Equal in lustre, were now best, now worst,
As presence did present them; him in eye,
Still him in praise: and, being present both
‘Twas said they saw but one; and no discerner
Durst wag his tongue in censure. When these suns—
For so they phrase ’em—by their heralds challenged
The noble spirits to arms, they did perform
Beyond thought’s compass; that former fabulous story,
Being now seen possible enough, got credit,
That Bevis was believed.§

DUTCH:
Beide vorsten,
Gelijk in pracht, zij waren eerste of laatste
Naar ieder zichtbaar was; die in het oog was,
Was de eerste in lof; en waren beiden zichtbaar,
Dan zeide een elk er éen te zien; geen kenner,
Wiens tong een oordeel waagde

MORE:
Pomp=Ceremony
Following=Successive
Bevis=Bevis of Hampton, famed for incredible feats of chivalry in romance stories of the time
Its=Its own
Clinquant=Glittering
To shine down=Outshine
Madams=Ladies (high born)
Pride=Adornment
Masque=Masquerade, entertainment
Discerner=Observer
Censure=Criticism
Fabulous=Mythical or invented
Credit=Credibility
Compleat:
Pomp=Pracht, praal, staatsi
To out-shine=Meerder uytschynen, meerblinken, glansiger zyn
Censure=Bestraffing, berisping, oordeel, toets
Credit=Geloof, achting, aanzien, goede naam

Burgersdijk notes:
Tot Bevis’ daden toe. Bevis was een held der oud-Engelsche ridderromances, die den reus Ascapart overwon en, hoewel hij een Saks was, wegens zijne dapperheid door Willem den Veroveraar tot graaf van Southampton verheven werd.

Topics: achievement, work, rivalry

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Gremio
CONTEXT:
KATHERINE
Why, and I trust I may go too, may I not? What, shall I
be appointed hours as though, belike, I knew not what
to take and what to leave, ha?
GREMIO
You may go to the devil’s dam! Your gifts are so good
here’s none will hold you.—Their love is not so great,
Hortensio, but we may blow our nails together and fast
it fairly out. Our cake’s dough on both sides. Farewell.
Yet for the love I bear my sweet Bianca, if I can by
any means light on a fit man to teach her that wherein
she delights, I will wish him to her father.
HORTENSIO
So will I, Signior Gremio. But a word, I pray. Though
the nature of our quarrel yet never brooked parle, know
now upon advice, it toucheth us both, that we may yet
again have access to our fair mistress and be happy
rivals in Bianca’s love, to labour and effect one thing
specially.

DUTCH:
Loop naar des duivels grootmoeder! – Uwe gaven zijn
zoo goed, dat niemand van u gediend is. – Zoo groot
is de liefde tusschen Katharina en haar vader niet, Hortensio,
of wij mogen wel op onze nagels gaan blazen
en geduldig vasten; onze koek is aan geen van beide
zijden nog gaar.

MORE:
Proverb: My cake is dough (cake that isn’t properly baked)

Belike=Perhaps
Dam=Mother
Wish=Commend
Brooked=Endured (also abrook)
Parle=Discussion
Compleat:
Dam=Een dam; de moer van sommige beesten
Wish=Wenschen
Brook=Verdraagen, uitstaan
To brook an affront=Een leed verkroppen
Parley=Gesprek over voorwaarden, onderhandeling, gesprekhouding

Burgersdijk notes:
Zoo groot is de liefde tusschen Katharina en haar vader niet. Er staat eigenlijk alleen: „Hun liefde is zoo groot niet”; doch dit moet beteekenen, wat in de vertaling is uitgedrukt : de liefde tusschen hen beiden is zoo groot niet, dat zij op den duur een echtverbintenis van Bianca tegenhoudt, al moeten de twee medevrijers nu rustig wachten, daar zij op ‘t oogenblik teleurgesteld zijn . Dit Iaatste wordt uitgedrukt door ‘t ongaar zijn van den koek.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, love, rivalry

PLAY: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Lysander
CONTEXT:
HELENA
Do not say so, Lysander. Say not so.
What though he love your Hermia? Lord, what though?
Yet Hermia still loves you. Then be content.
LYSANDER
Content with Hermia? No. I do repent
The tedious minutes I with her have spent.
Not Hermia but Helena I love.
Who will not change a raven for a dove?
The will of man is by his reason swayed,
And reason says you are the worthier maid.
Things growing are not ripe until their season.
So I, being young, till now ripe not to reason.
And touching now the point of human skill,
Reason becomes the marshal to my will
And leads me to your eyes, where I o’erlook
Love’s stories written in love’s richest book.

DUTCH:
En heb ik ‘t oordeel nu van onderscheid,
Dan zij ‘t de rede, die mijn keus geleid’;
Die laat mij nu der liefde doen en wezen
In gouden lett’ren uit uw oogen lezen.,

MORE:
What though=What does it matter
Will=Desire
Ripe not=Don’t ripen
Point=Height (of human skill)
Marshal=Officer at arms; officer who established rank at ceremonies
O’erlook=Glance over, read; look over
Reason=Sense of judgement
Compleat:
Will=Wille
Marshal=een Marschalk

Burgersdijk notes:
In gouden lett’ren. Love’s stories, written in love’s richest book. Zooals hier Helena, wordt in Romeo en Julia Graaf Paris met een kostelijk boek vergeleken.

Topics: regret, love, rivalry, nature, reason

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Marcus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
How, sir! are you in earnest then, my lord?
BASSIANUS
Ay, noble Titus; and resolved withal
To do myself this reason and this right.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
‘Suum cuique’ is our Roman justice:
This prince in justice seizeth but his own.
LUCIUS
And that he will, and shall, if Lucius live.

DUTCH:
Het suum cuique geldt in Rome als recht;
De prins neemt niets, dan wat naar recht het zijne is.

MORE:
Resolved=Prepared
Suum cuique=To each his own
But his own=Only what he is entitled to
Compleat:
Resolve=Beraad, beslissing, uitsluitsel
But=Maar, of, dan, behalven, maar alleen

Topics: dispute, claim, rivalry

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
Be of good cheer;
They shall no more prevail than we give way to.
Keep comfort to you; and this morning see
You do appear before them: if they shall chance,
In charging you with matters, to commit you,
The best persuasions to the contrary
Fail not to use, and with what vehemency
The occasion shall instruct you: if entreaties
Will render you no remedy, this ring
Deliver them, and your appeal to us
There make before them. Look, the good man weeps!
He’s honest, on mine honour. God’s blest mother!
I swear he is true-hearted; and a soul
None better in my kingdom. Get you gone,
And do as I have bid you

DUTCH:
Zoo laat niet na, uw beste tegengronden
Te ontvouwen, met al ‘t vuur en al de kracht,
Die ‘t oogenblik u ingeeft.

MORE:
Give way=Permit
Chance=Happen to, if it so happens that
Instruct=Requires, is appropriate
Compleat:
To give way=Wyken, plaats maaken
To chance=Voorvallen, gebeuren
If any man chance to ask=Byaldien iemand zou moogen vraagen

Topics: conspiracy, plans/intentions, rivalry

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Catesby
CONTEXT:
CATESBY
Rescue, my lord of Norfolk, rescue, rescue!
The king enacts more wonders than a man,
Daring an opposite to every danger.
His horse is slain, and all on foot he fights,
Seeking for Richmond in the throat of death.
Rescue, fair lord, or else the day is lost!

DUTCH:
Ter hulp, mylord van Norfolk, op! ter hulp !
‘t Is bovenmenschlijk, wat de koning doet;
Hij trotst op dood en leven ied’ren vijand.
Zijn paard is dood ; hij vecht te voet steeds voort,
En zoekt naar Richmond in den muil des doods.
Breng hulp, mylord, of alles is verloren.

MORE:
Daring=Challenging, facing
Opposite=Opponent
Compleat:
Opposite=Tegen over, tegen strydig
Daring=Stout, uyttartend

‘t Is bovenmensch’lijk, wat de konin g doet. Inderdaad streed Richard met ontembare dapperheid, hij wilde overwinnen of als koning sterven . Zjjn leger was veel grooter dan van zijn tegenstander, maar het verraad schuilde in zijne benden. Lord Thomas Stanley, Richmond’s stiefvader, vereenigde zich onder het gevecht met Richmond . Richard stortte zich in glanzende wapenrusting, met de fonkelende kroon op den helm in het dichtste strijdgewoel, om zijn tegenstander te bereiken. Reeds had hjj Sir William Brandon, Richmond’s banierdrager, met zijn lans geveld, een anderen sterken ridder ter aarde doen storten, hij bedreigde Richmond zelf, toen te rechter tijd Sir William Stanley, de broeder van Thomas, met drieduizend kloeke mannen Richmond ter hulpe kwam en Richard’s manschappen op de vlucht dreef. Richard zelf vond na manhaften strijd den dood. Lord Stanley nam zijne van zwaardslagen stukgehouwen kroon en zette haar den overwinnenden Richmond op het hoofd, die door het leper als koning Hendrik VII begroet werd. Des avonds bracht een heraut van Richard, Blanc Sanglier, het naakte lijk van zijn geweldigen meester, als een geveld stuk wild voor hem op het paard hangende, de stad Leicester binnen, waar het in een klooster ter aarde besteld werd .

Topics: rivalry, courage

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Third Conspirator
CONTEXT:
SECOND CONSPIRATOR
Most noble sir,
If you do hold the same intent wherein
You wish’d us parties, we’ll deliver you
Of your great danger.
AUFIDIUS
Sir, I cannot tell:
We must proceed as we do find the people.
THIRD CONSPIRATOR
The people will remain uncertain whilst
’Twixt you there’s difference; but the fall of either
Makes the survivor heir of all.
AUFIDIUS
I know it;
And my pretext to strike at him admits
A good construction. I raised him, and I pawn’d
Mine honour for his truth: who being so heighten’d,
He water’d his new plants with dews of flattery,
Seducing so my friends; and, to this end,
He bow’d his nature, never known before
But to be rough, unswayable and free.

DUTCH:
Steeds wankel blijft het volk, zoolang er strijd
Is tusschen u en hem, maar de ondergang
Van de’ een doet de’ ander alles erven.

MORE:
Construction=Interpretation
A good construction=Well-founded
Pawn=Pledge
To bow=To crush, to strain
Compleat:
To bow=Buigen, neigen, bukken
Construction=Uitlegging; woordenschikking
To pawn=Verpanden

Topics: reputation, uncertainty, conflict, rivalry

PLAY: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Lysander
CONTEXT:
HELENA
Do not say so, Lysander. Say not so.
What though he love your Hermia? Lord, what though?
Yet Hermia still loves you. Then be content.
LYSANDER
Content with Hermia? No. I do repent
The tedious minutes I with her have spent.
Not Hermia but Helena I love.
Who will not change a raven for a dove?
The will of man is by his reason swayed,
And reason says you are the worthier maid.
Things growing are not ripe until their season.
So I, being young, till now ripe not to reason.
And touching now the point of human skill,
Reason becomes the marshal to my will
And leads me to your eyes, where I o’erlook
Love’s stories written in love’s richest book.

DUTCH:
Wie kiest een kraai, als hem een duif verschijnt?
De rede sture steeds den wil des mans;
De rede zegt mij: u behoort de krans.

MORE:
What though=What does it matter
Will=Desire
Ripe not=Don’t ripen
Point=Height (of human skill)
Marshal=Officer at arms; officer who established rank at ceremonies
O’erlook=Glance over, read; look over
Reason=Sense of judgement
Compleat:
Will=Wille
Marshal=een Marschalk

Burgersdijk notes:
In gouden lett’ren. Love’s stories, written in love’s richest book. Zooals hier Helena, wordt in Romeo en Julia Graaf Paris met een kostelijk boek vergeleken.

Topics: regret, love, rivalry, nature, reason

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Hortensio
CONTEXT:
GREMIO
I cannot tell. But I had as lief take her dowry with
this condition: to be whipped at the high cross every
morning.
HORTENSIO
Faith, as you say, there’s small choice in rotten
apples. But come, since this bar in law makes us
friends, it shall be so far forth friendly maintained
till by helping Baptista’s eldest daughter to a husband
we set his youngest free for a husband, and then have to
’t afresh. Sweet Bianca! Happy man be his dole! He that
runs fastest gets the ring. How say you, Signior
Gremio?
GREMIO
I am agreed, and would I had given him the best horse
in Padua to begin his wooing that would thoroughly woo
her, wed her, and bed her, and rid the house of her!
Come on.

DUTCH:
Ik geef toe, uit rotte appels is het kwaad kiezen.

MORE:
Proverb: There is a small choice in rotten apples (1594)
Proverb: Happy man happy dole (be his dole)
Proverb: He that hops best (runs fases) gets the ring

As lief=As happily
Bar in law=Legal obstacle
Afresh=Anew
Compleat:
I had as lief=Ik wilde al zo lief
Bar=Een dwarsboom, draaiboom, sluytboom, boom, hinderpaal, diefeyzer, traali, beletsel

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, rivalry, friendship

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Norfolk
CONTEXT:
NORFOLK
(…) Then you lost
The view of earthly glory: men might say,
Till this time pomp was single, but now married
To one above itself. Each following day
Became the next day’s master, till the last
Made former wonders its. To-day the French,
All clinquant, all in gold, like heathen gods,
Shone down the English; and, to-morrow, they
Made Britain India: every man that stood
Show’d like a mine. Their dwarfish pages were
As cherubins, all guilt: the madams too,
Not used to toil, did almost sweat to bear
The pride upon them, that their very labour
Was to them as a painting: now this masque
Was cried incomparable; and the ensuing night
Made it a fool and beggar. The two kings,
Equal in lustre, were now best, now worst,
As presence did present them; him in eye,
Still him in praise: and, being present both
‘Twas said they saw but one; and no discerner
Durst wag his tongue in censure. When these suns—
For so they phrase ’em—by their heralds challenged
The noble spirits to arms, they did perform
Beyond thought’s compass; that former fabulous story,
Being now seen possible enough, got credit,
That Bevis was believed.§

DUTCH:
Toen die zonnen, —
Zoo heetten zij, — ten kamp door hun herauten
Alle eed’le geesten riepen, zag men daden,
Ver boven denkbaarheid; en de oude fabel,
Die nu eerst moog’lijk bleek, vond thans geloof’,
Tot Bevis’ daden toe.

MORE:
Pomp=Ceremony
Following=Successive
Bevis=Bevis of Hampton, famed for incredible feats of chivalry in romance stories of the time
Its=Its own
Clinquant=Glittering
To shine down=Outshine
Madams=Ladies (high born)
Pride=Adornment
Masque=Masquerade, entertainment
Discerner=Observer
Censure=Criticism
Fabulous=Mythical or invented
Credit=Credibility
Compleat:
Pomp=Pracht, praal, staatsi
To out-shine=Meerder uytschynen, meerblinken, glansiger zyn
Censure=Bestraffing, berisping, oordeel, toets
Credit=Geloof, achting, aanzien, goede naam

Burgersdijk notes:
Tot Bevis’ daden toe. Bevis was een held der oud-Engelsche ridderromances, die den reus Ascapart overwon en, hoewel hij een Saks was, wegens zijne dapperheid door Willem den Veroveraar tot graaf van Southampton verheven werd.

Topics: achievement, work, rivalry

PLAY: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Lysander
CONTEXT:
LYSANDER
Content with Hermia? No. I do repent
The tedious minutes I with her have spent.
Not Hermia but Helena I love.
Who will not change a raven for a dove?
The will of man is by his reason swayed,
And reason says you are the worthier maid.
Things growing are not ripe until their season.
So I, being young, till now ripe not to reason.
And touching now the point of human skill,
Reason becomes the marshal to my will
And leads me to your eyes, where I o’erlook
Love’s stories written in love’s richest book.

DUTCH:
Wat groeit, bereikt zijn rijpheid schreê voor schrede
Mijn jeugd eerst nu de rijpheid van de rede.

MORE:
What though=What does it matter
Will=Desire
Ripe not=Don’t ripen
Point=Height (of human skill)
Marshal=Officer at arms; officer who established rank at ceremonies
O’erlook=Glance over, read; look over
Reason=Sense of judgement
Compleat:
Will=Wille
Marshal=een Marschalk

Burgersdijk notes:
In gouden lett’ren. Love’s stories, written in love’s richest book. Zooals hier Helena, wordt in Romeo en Julia Graaf Paris met een kostelijk boek vergeleken.

Topics: regret, love, rivalry, nature, reason

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
Most dread liege,
The good I stand on is my truth and honesty:
If they shall fail, I, with mine enemies,
Will triumph o’er my person; which I weigh not,
Being of those virtues vacant. I fear nothing
What can be said against me.
KING HENRY VIII
Know you not
How your state stands i’ the world, with the whole world?
Your enemies are many, and not small; their practices
Must bear the same proportion; and not ever
The justice and the truth o’ the question carries
The due o’ the verdict with it: at what ease
Might corrupt minds procure knaves as corrupt
To swear against you? such things have been done.
You are potently opposed; and with a malice
Of as great size. Ween you of better luck,
I mean, in perjured witness, than your master,
Whose minister you are, whiles here he lived
Upon this naughty earth? Go to, go to;
You take a precipice for no leap of danger,
And woo your own destruction.

DUTCH:
Ga, ga voort!
Een afgrond schijnt u geen gewaagde sprong;
Gij zoekt het onheil!

MORE:
Dread=Revered
Weigh=Value
Vacant=Without, lacking
Practice=Plot
Due=Right, benefit
At=With
Procure=Buy, bribe
Potently opposed=Powerful opponents
Ween=Think
Minister=Agent
Compleat:
Dread sovereign=Geduchte Vorst
Weigh very much with me=Zyn van groot gewigt by my
To procure=Te wege brengen, verkrygen, bekomen, erlangen
Potent=Magtig

Topics: conspiracy, plans/intentions, rivalry

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