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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Salerio
CONTEXT:
SALERIO
Why, yet it lives there unchecked that Antonio hath a
ship of rich lading wracked on the narrow seas. The
Goodwins I think they call the place—a very dangerous
flat, and fatal, where the carcasses of many a tall ship
lie buried, as they say, if my gossip report be an
honest woman of her word.
SOLANIO
I would she were as lying a gossip in that as ever
knapped ginger or made her neighbors believe she wept
for the death of a third husband. But it is true,
without any slips of prolixity or crossing the plain
highway of talk, that the good Antonio, the honest
Antonio—oh, that I had a title good enough to keep his
name company!—
SALERIO
Come, the full stop.
SOLANIO
Ha, what sayest thou? Why, the end is he hath lost a
ship.

DUTCH:
Maar het is waar, — zonder in wijdloopigheid te vervallen, en van den effen grooten weg van het gesprek af te wijken

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
FDIC v. Municipality of Ponce, 708 F. Supp. 464 (1989), incorporated into the body of the decision:
“On July 12, 1983, two agreements were executed by Girod Trust Company, Codfish Corporation, and the Municipality of Ponce, the first entitled “Loan Agreement” and the second “Open End Credit,” whereby Girod lent to Codfish $500,000.00 and $750,000.00 respectively. Both instruments were signed by Erasto Rodríguez, on behalf of the Municipality, as guarantor.
Codfish’s “ship of rich lading wreck’d on the narrow seas;” it defaulted on the loans and eventually filed for bankruptcy. In the meantime, it was “never heard a passion so confus’d, so strange, outrageous, and so variable as [Girod] did utter in the streets. ‘My daughter! O my ducats! O my daughter!'” Girod’s daughter ran off with its ducats, and it was declared insolvent and turned over to the FDIC as receiver. The loans at issue in this case were then sold to the FDIC in its corporate capacity.”

Goodwins=The Goodwin sands
Gossip report=Rumour
Knap=Take small bites
Come to the full stop=Get to the point
Prolixity=Verbosity, wordiness
Crossing the plain highway=Deviating from plain speech
Compleat:
Gossip=Een doophefster, gemoeder, peet
A tattling gossip=Een Labbey, kaekelaarster

Burgersdijk notes:
De Goodwins, gevaarlijke ondiepten nabij den mond van de Theems, worden ook vermeld in Koning Jan, V. 3, 2. — Dat oude vrouwen gaarne gember knauwen reg. 10, (to knap is: in kleine stukjens bijten) wordt ook vermeld in Maat voor maat, IV, 3, 8,

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
But little. I am armed and well prepared.—
Give me your hand, Bassanio. Fare you well
Grieve not that I am fall’n to this for you,
For herein Fortune shows herself more kind
Than is her custom. It is still her use
To let the wretched man outlive his wealth,
To view with hollow eye and wrinkled brow
An age of poverty—from which lingering penance
Of such misery doth she cut me off.
Commend me to your honourable wife.
Tell her the process of Antonio’s end.
Say how I loved you. Speak me fair in death.
And when the tale is told, bid her be judge
Whether Bassanio had not once a love.
Repent but you that you shall lose your friend,
And he repents not that he pays your debt.
For if the Jew do cut but deep enough,
I’ll pay it presently with all my heart.

DUTCH:
Slechts luttel; ‘k ben bereid en welgewapend! —
Geef mij de hand, Bassanio, vaar gij wel!

MORE:
But little=Just a little
Use=Habit
Process=Tale
Repent but you=Only regret

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Exeter
CONTEXT:
EXETER
Well didst thou, Richard, to suppress thy voice;
For, had the passions of thy heart burst out,
I fear we should have seen decipher’d there
More rancorous spite, more furious raging broils,
Than yet can be imagined or supposed.
But howsoe’er, no simple man that sees
This jarring discord of nobility,
This shouldering of each other in the court,
This factious bandying of their favourites,
But that it doth presage some ill event.
‘Tis much when sceptres are in children’s hands;
But more when envy breeds unkind division;
There comes the ruin, there begins confusion.

DUTCH:
t Is erg, indien een kind den scepter zwaait,
Maar erger nog, zoo haat verdeeldheid broedt,
Dan gaan we ellende en omkeer te gemoet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Deciphered=Be revealed, detected
Rancorous=Malignant, hateful
Broil=(a) tumult, noisy quarrel, contention; (b) war, combat, battle
Simple=Common
Jarring=Clashing, discordant
Bandy=To beat to and fro (fig. of words, looks)
Shoulder=To push with violence and with a view of supplanting
Unkind=Unnatural

Compleat:
Deciphered=Ontcyferd
Rancorous=Nydig, vik afgunst en nyd
Broil=Oproer, beroerte, gewoel
Simple=Eenvoudig, onnozel
To jar=Krakkeelen, twisten, harrewarren, oneens zyn, kyven
Bandy=Een bal weer toeslaan; een zaak voor en tegen betwisten
Shoulder=Schouderen

Topics: envy, conflict, consequence, ruin

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Fool
CONTEXT:
Thou wast a pretty fellow when thou hadst no need to care for her frowning. Now thou art an O without a figure. I am better than thou art now. I am a fool. Thou art nothing.
(to GONERIL) Yes, forsooth, I will hold my tongue. So your face bids me, though you say nothing. Mum, mum,
He that keeps nor crust nor crumb,
Weary of all, shall want some.
(indicating LEAR) That’s a shelled peascod.

DUTCH:
Bedaard, bedaard;
Want wie korst noch kruim bewaart,
Treurt, dat hij niets heeft bespaard.
Die daar is een uitgedopte erwteschil.

MORE:
He that keeps nor crust nor crumb: he who foolishly gives everything away because he is tired of it will eventually need some of it back.
An O without a figure=a cipher, a zero with no other number to give it a value
Schmidt:
Shelled peascod (or pescod)=a shelled peaspod: insult, an empty peapod (een lege peulenschil), a nothing.

Topics: poverty and wealth, excess, value, caution, ruin

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
What should this mean?
What sudden anger’s this? how have I reap’d it?
He parted frowning from me, as if ruin
Leap’d from his eyes: so looks the chafed lion
Upon the daring huntsman that has gall’d him;
Then makes him nothing. I must read this paper;
I fear, the story of his anger. ‘Tis so;
This paper has undone me: ’tis the account
Of all that world of wealth I have drawn together
For mine own ends; indeed, to gain the popedom,
And fee my friends in Rome. O negligence!
Fit for a fool to fall by: what cross devil
Made me put this main secret in the packet
I sent the king? Is there no way to cure this?
No new device to beat this from his brains?
I know ’twill stir him strongly; yet I know
A way, if it take right, in spite of fortune
Will bring me off again. What’s this? ‘To the Pope!’
The letter, as I live, with all the business
I writ to’s holiness. Nay then, farewell!
I have touch’d the highest point of all my greatness;
And, from that full meridian of my glory,
I haste now to my setting: I shall fall
Like a bright exhalation in the evening,
And no man see me more.

DUTCH:
Is er geen middel,
Geen kunstgreep, die dit wegdrijft uit zijn brein?

MORE:
Chafed=Angry
Galled=Injured
Undone=Ruined
Fee=Pay
Packet=Package of papers
Device=Scheme, plot
Stir=Irritate
Meridian=Top point
Exhalation=Meteor
Compleat:
Chafed=Verhit, vertoornd, gevreeven
To gall=’t Vel afschuuren, smarten
To gall the enemy=Den vyand benaauwen
Undone=Ontdaan, losgemaakt, bedurven
To fee=Beloonen, betaalen, de handen vullen, de oogen uytsteken door giften
Device=List; uytvindsel, gedichtsel
Stir=Gewoel, geraas, beroerte, oproer
Meridian=Middagslyn

Topics: ruin, negligence, plans/intentions, remedy

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Gaunt
CONTEXT:
O, had thy grandsire with a prophet’s eye
Seen how his son’s son should destroy his sons,
From forth thy reach he would have laid thy shame,
Deposing thee before thou wert possessed,
Which art possessed now to depose thyself.
Why, cousin, wert thou regent of the world,
It were a shame to let this land by lease;
But, for thy world enjoying but this land,
Is it not more than shame to shame it so?
Landlord of England art thou now, not king.
Thy state of law is bondslave to the law,
And thou—

DUTCH:
Landheer van England zijt gij thans, niet koning;
Uw vorstlijk recht is nu de slaaf der wet

MORE:

Grandsire=Edward III
Deposing=Removing from the throne
Possessed=In possession of; posssessed by (an evil spirit)
Is bondslave=Has become slave to

Topics: wellbeing, failure, ruin

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Captain
CONTEXT:
CAPTAIN
’Tis thought the king is dead; we will not stay.
The bay-trees in our country are all wither’d
And meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven;
The pale-faced moon looks bloody on the earth
And lean-look’d prophets whisper fearful change;
Rich men look sad and ruffians dance and leap,
The one in fear to lose what they enjoy,
The other to enjoy by rage and war:
These signs forerun the death or fall of kings.
Farewell: our countrymen are gone and fled,
As well assured Richard their king is dead.
EARL OF SALISBURY
Ah, Richard, with the eyes of heavy mind
I see thy glory like a shooting star
Fall to the base earth from the firmament.
Thy sun sets weeping in the lowly west,
Witnessing storms to come, woe and unrest:
Thy friends are fled to wait upon thy foes,
And crossly to thy good all fortune goes.

DUTCH:
De rijken zijn bedrukt en schelmen dansen; —
Die duchten het verlies van geld en goed,
En dezen hopen op geweld en oorlog;

MORE:

Lean-looked=Thin-faced
Meteor=A bright phenomenon, thought to be portentous, harbinger of doom
Fixed stars=Symbol of permanence
Forerun=Precede
Assured=Convinced, persuaded
Witness=Portend
Wait upon=Serve
Crossly=Adversely

Compleat:
To assure=Verzekeren
Portend=Voorduiden, voorzeggen

Topics: ruin, nature, conflict, fate/destiny

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
There is nor flying hence nor tarrying here.
I ‘gin to be aweary of the sun,
And wish th’ estate o’ th’ world were now undone.—
Ring the alarum-bell!—Blow, wind! Come, wrack!
At least we’ll die with harness on our back.

DUTCH:
Luidt, luidt alarm! — Blaas, wind! verschijn, verderf!
Dit rest mij toch, dat ik in ‘t harnas sterf!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Estate= State, peculiar form of existence
Wrack=Destruction, ruin; loss, decay
(nowadays: to fall into / go to (w)rack and ruin, e.g. a building or a business falling into decay or disrepair due to lack of upkeep)
Compleat:
Estate (or condition)=Staat, omstandigheid
Wrack (or shipwrack)=Schipbreuk
To go to wrack=Verlooren gaan, te gronde gaan
Wrack ( the part of the ship that is perished and cast a shoar, belonging to the King)=Wrak van een verongelukt Schip
Wracked=Aan stukken gestooten, te gronde gegaan

Topics: ruin, failure

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Abergavenny
CONTEXT:
BUCKINGHAM
Why the devil,
Upon this French going out, took he upon him,
Without the privity o’ the king, to appoint
Who should attend on him? He makes up the file
Of all the gentry; for the most part such
To whom as great a charge as little honour
He meant to lay upon: and his own letter,
The honourable board of council out,
Must fetch him in [t]he papers.
ABERGAVENNY
I do know
Kinsmen of mine, three at the least, that have
By this so sickened their estates, that never
They shall abound as formerly.
BUCKINGHAM
O, many
Have broke their backs with laying manors on ’em
For this great journey. What did this vanity
But minister communication of
A most poor issue?

DUTCH:
Neven ken ik,
Ten minste drie, die door den tocht hun midd’len
Zoo hebben uitgeput, dat zij nooit meer
Tot welstand komen.

MORE:
Proverb: To break one’s back
Privity=Knowledge (as in privy to)
File=List
Out=Not meeting
Sickened=Diminished, depleted
Abound=Prosper
Manors=Estates
Vanity=Folly
Minister communication=Put into effect
Issue=Outcome
Compleat:
Privity=Een bewustheyd van iets
To abound=Overvloeijen
Mannor-house=Een huys of slot van den ambachtsheer
Vanity=Ydelheyd
To minister=Bedienen
Issue=Een uytgang, uytslag, uytkomst

Topics: ruin, poverty and wealth, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.4.
SPEAKER: Somerset
CONTEXT:
It is too late; I cannot send them now:
This expedition was by York and Talbot
Too rashly plotted: all our general force
Might with a sally of the very town
Be buckled with: the over-daring Talbot
Hath sullied all his gloss of former honour
By this unheedful, desperate, wild adventure:
York set him on to fight and die in shame,
That, Talbot dead, great York might bear the name

DUTCH:
Talbots overmoed
Heeft heel den glans van al zijn vroegere eer
Bevlekt door dit onzinnig dolle waagstuk.
York dreef hem aan tot strijd en roemloos sterven,
Om zelf des dooden Talbots glorie te erven.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Expedition=A warlike enterprise
Sally=An issue of troops from a besieged place
Buckled with=Join in close fight, resist
Sullied=Tarnished
The very town=The garrison

Compleat:
Expedition=Een krygsverrichting
Sally=Uitvallen
Buckle=(to buckle together) Worstelen, schermutselen
Sullied=Bemorst, vuil gemaakt, bezoedeld

Topics: haste, preparation, caution, honour, ruin, risk

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Hume
CONTEXT:
They, knowing Dame Eleanor’s aspiring humour,
Have hired me to undermine the duchess
And buzz these conjurations in her brain.
They say ‘ A crafty knave does need no broker;’
Yet am I Suffolk and the cardinal’s broker.
Hume, if you take not heed, you shall go near
To call them both a pair of crafty knaves.
Well, so its stands; and thus, I fear, at last
Hume’s knavery will be the duchess’ wrack,
And her attainture will be Humphrey’s fall.
Sort how it will, I shall have gold for all.

DUTCH:
Geen sluwe schelm, zoo zegt men, neemt een helper;

MORE:

Proverb: A cunning (crafty) knave needs no broker

Modern usage: Mum’s the word
Not invented by Shakespeare: the word was first used in the 14th century, although Shakespeare probably helped to make it popular. The word ‘mum’ may refer to the humming sound made by a closed mouth.
Asketh=Demands, requires
Buz=(or buzz) Whisper
Conjurations=Incantations; obsecration
Wrack=Ruin
Attainture=Shame; conviction

Compleat:
Knave=Een guit, boef
To buzz into one’s ears=Iemand in ‘t oor blaazen
Conjuration=Samenzweering, eedgespan, vloekverwantschap, bezweering
Wrack=(a ship): Een schip aan stukken stooten
To go to wrack=Verlooren gaan, te gronde gaan
To attaint=Overtuigen van misdaad, schuldig verklaaren, betichten; bevlekken, bederf aanzetten
Attainture (of blood)=Bederving of aansteeking des bloeds

Topics: proverbs and idioms, ambition, corruption, ruin

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Cromwell
CONTEXT:
CROMWELL
My Lord of Winchester, you are a little,
By your good favour, too sharp; men so noble,
However faulty, yet should find respect
For what they have been: ’tis a cruelty
To load a falling man.

DUTCH:
Mylord van Winchester, gij zijt een weinig, —
Vergun mij, — al te scherp. Een man, zoo edel,
Moest, hoe hij dwaal’, toch immer achting vinden
Om wat hij is geweest; ‘t is wreed, een last
Op hem, die valt, te leggen.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
The Florida Bar v. Silverman, 196 So.2d 442, 444 (Fla. 1967)(Ervin, J;)(dissent).

By your good favour=With your permission
Load=Burden
Sharp=Harsh
Compleat:
Favour=Begunstigen, gunste toedraagen
Load=Laading, last, vracht
Sharp=Scherp, spits, bits, streng, scherpzinnig

Topics: cited in law, haste, respect, ruin

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
So that you had her wrinkles and I her money,
I would she did as you say.
PAROLLES
Why, I say nothing.
CLOWN
Marry, you are the wiser man; for many a man’s
tongue shakes out his master’s undoing: to say
nothing, to do nothing, to know nothing, and to have
nothing, is to be a great part of your title; which
is within a very little of nothing.
PAROLLES
Away! thou’rt a knave.

DUTCH:
Het wijste, wat gij doen kunt, want menigen dienaar’s
tong praat zijn meester in het verderf. Niets zeggen,
niets doen, niets weten en niets hebben, maakt een
groot deel van uw waardigheid uit, die uit een zeer
klein deel van niets bestaat.

MORE:
Title=Intrinsic value, position
Undoing=Ruin
Compleat:
Undoing=Losmaaking, bederving
That was the undoing of him=Dat was zyn verderf

Topics: respect, order/society, ruin

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