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PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
O monstrous arrogance! Thou liest, thou thread, thou thimble,
Thou yard, three-quarters, half-yard, quarter, nail!
Thou flea, thou nit, thou winter cricket thou!
Braved in mine own house with a skein of thread?
Away, thou rag, thou quantity, thou remnant,
Or I shall so be-mete thee with thy yard
As thou shalt think on prating whilst thou liv’st!
I tell thee, I, that thou hast marred her gown.
TAILOR
Your Worship is deceived. The gown is made
Just as my master had direction.
Grumio gave order how it should be done.
GRUMIO
I gave him no order. I gave him the stuff.
TAILOR
But how did you desire it should be made?
GRUMIO
Marry, sir, with needle and thread.
TAILOR
But did you not request to have it cut?
GRUMIO
Thou hast faced many things.
TAILOR
I have.
GRUMIO
Face not me. Thou hast braved many men; brave not me. I
will neither be faced nor braved. I say unto thee, I
bid thy master cut out the gown, but I did not bid him
cut it to pieces. Ergo, thou liest.
TAILOR
Why, here is the note of the fashion to testify.

DUTCH:
Jij endjen draad, mij tarten in mijn huis!
Voort, voort, jij lap, jij vod, jij lomp, jij snipper,
Of ik neem met jouw el je zoo de maat,
Dat heel je leven je deez’ praatjes rouwen!
Dat kleed, zeg ik nog eens, het is verknipt .


MORE:
Nail=Measure of cloth
Nit=Louse egg
Brave=(1) to “dress in fine clothes”; (2) “to defy.”
Yard=Measuring stick
Quantity=Fragment
Be-mete=Measure
Prating=Talking
Stuff=Material
Whilst=For as long as
Compleat:
Nail (one eighth of an ell)=De agste deel van een el
Nit=Een neet
To brave=Trotsen, braveeren, trotseeren; moedig treeden
To prate=Praaten. Prate and prattle=Keffen en snappen. Prate foolishly=Mal praaten

Topics: insult, fashion/trends, work, satisfaction, vanity

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Marcus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
And welcome, nephews, from successful wars,
You that survive, and you that sleep in fame!
Fair lords, your fortunes are alike in all,
That in your country’s service drew your swords:
But safer triumph is this funeral pomp,
That hath aspired to Solon’s happiness
And triumphs over chance in honour’s bed.
Titus Andronicus, the people of Rome,
Whose friend in justice thou hast ever been,
Send thee by me, their tribune and their trust,
This palliament of white and spotless hue;
And name thee in election for the empire,
With these our late-deceased emperor’s sons:
Be candidatus then, and put it on,
And help to set a head on headless Rome.

DUTCH:
Wees alzoo candidatus, sla dit om,
En schenk aan ‘t hoofdloos Rome weer een hoofd.

MORE:

Solon=Ancient greek philosopher who said “Call no man happy until he is dead”
Palliament=White robe, here the emperor’s ceremonial robe
Asired=Risen
Candidatus=Latin for candidate for office
Headless=Without a leader
Compleat:
Candidate=Amptverzoeker, mededinger naar een ampt, naastander
Headless=Hoofdeloos

Burgersdijk notes:
Wees alzoo candidatus, d. i. met de witte toga bekleed, waarin zij zich wikkelden, die hij de overheid en het volk naar openbare ambten dongen; het Latijnsche woord beteekent hier dus kroonpretendent. De voorgangers van Sh. spreidden gaarne hunne geleerdheid ten toon en bezigden Latijnsche
en zelfs Grieksche woorden. *) Sh. treedt hier in hun voetstappen en brengt later (Blz. 14, I. 1. 28o) het zeggen „Suum cuique”, „Aan ieder het zijne”, te pas.

Topics: leadership, respect, satisfaction

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Proteus
CONTEXT:
SPEED
Well, I perceive I must be fain to bear with you.
PROTEUS
Why, sir, how do you bear with me?
SPEED
Marry, sir, the letter, very orderly, having nothing but the word “noddy” for my pains.
PROTEUS
Beshrew me, but you have a quick wit.
SPEED
And yet it cannot overtake your slow purse.

DUTCH:
Verduiveld, gij zijt bij de hand!
– En toch kan mijn vlugge hand uw trage beurs niet
machtig worden.

MORE:
Fain=Be contented
Bear with=Put up with
Orderly=Properly
Beshrew=Curse
Noddy=Simpleton, foolish
Compleat:
Fain=Gaern, genoodzaakt
To bear with=Toegeeven, geduld hebben, zich verdraagzaam aanstellen
Pray bear with me=Ey lieve schik wat met my in
Orderly=Geschiktlyk, geregeld, ordentlyk
Beshrew=Bekyven, vervloeken

Topics: satisfaction, money, debt/obligation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Why, and I challenge nothing but my dukedom,
As being well content with that alone.
GLOUCESTER
But when the fox hath once got in his nose,
He’ll soon find means to make the body follow.
HASTINGS
Why, master mayor, why stand you in a doubt?
Open the gates; we are King Henry’s friends.

DUTCH:
Doch heeft de vos maar eerst zijn neus er binnen,
Dan zorgt hij ras, dat ook het lichaam volgt.

MORE:

Proverb: When the fox has got in his head (nose) he will soon make the body follow

In a doubt=Uncertain, irresolute, undecided

Compleat:
To be in doubt=In tryffel staan

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, satisfaction

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
Now, York, or never, steel thy fearful thoughts
And change misdoubt to resolution.
Be that thou hop’st to be, or what thou art
Resign to death; it is not worth th’ enjoying.
Let pale-faced fear keep with the mean-born man
And find no harbor in a royal heart.
Faster than springtime showers comes thought on
thought,
And not a thought but thinks on dignity.
My brain, more busy than the labouring spider,
Weaves tedious snares to trap mine enemies.
Well, nobles, well, ’tis politicly done
To send me packing with an host of men.
I fear me you but warm the starvèd snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your
hearts.

DUTCH:
Als voorjaarsbuien komt mij denk- bij denkbeeld,
Doch niet éen denkbeeld, dat niet grootheid denkt.

MORE:

Proverb: To nourish a viper (snake) in one ‘s bosom
Proverb: Ill putting (put not) a naked sword in a madman’s hand

Steel=Harden, strengthen
Politicly=For political reasons
Misdoubt=Forebodings
That=That which
Mean-born=Lowly
Dignity=High rank
Tedious=Laborious
The starved snake=Frozen snake (reference to Aesop’s Fable of the Farmer and the Snake)
Fell=Strong; Vicious, intense, savage

Compleat:
To steel=(harden): Hardmaaken, verharden; To steel one’s self in any sin=Zich in eene zonde verharden; To steel one against another=Den een tegen den ander ophitzen
Fell=(cruel) Wreed, fel
Starve=(of cold) Van koude sterven
Politickly=Staatkundiglyk
Of mean descent=Van een laage afkomst
Dignity (greatness, nobleness)=Grootheid, adelykheid; (merit, importance)=Waardigheid, staat-empot, verdiensten

Topics: proverbs and idioms, mercy, ambiiton, satisfaction

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
I am not yet of Percy’s mind, the Hotspur of the north, he that kills me some six or seven dozen of Scots at a breakfast, washes his hands, and says to his wife “Fie upon this quiet life! I want work.”

DUTCH:
Ik ben nog niet gestemd als Percy, de Heetspoor van het noorden, die je zijn zes of zeven dozijn Schotten voor zijn ontbijt ombrengt, zijn handen wascht en tot zijn vrouw zegt: “Foei, wat een stil leventje! ik verlang naar werk.”

MORE:
Mind=disposition

Topics: work, ambition, satisfaction

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
Thy gown? Why, ay. Come, tailor, let us see ’t.
O mercy, God! What masking stuff is here?
What’s this? A sleeve? ‘Tis like a demi-cannon.
What, up and down, carved like an apple tart?
Here’s snip and nip and cut and slish and slash,
Like to a censer in a barber’s shop.
Why, what i’ devil’s name, tailor, call’st thou this?
HORTENSIO
I see she’s like to have neither cap nor gown.
TAILOR
You bid me make it orderly and well,
According to the fashion and the time.
PETRUCHIO
Marry, and did. But if you be remembered,
I did not bid you mar it to the time.
Go, hop me over every kennel home,
For you shall hop without my custom, sir.
I’ll none of it. Hence, make your best of it.
KATHERINE
I never saw a better-fashioned gown,
More quaint, more pleasing, nor more commendable.
Belike you mean to make a puppet of me.
PETRUCHIO
Why, true, he means to make a puppet of thee.

DUTCH:
Ga, dros maar op, door dik en dun, naar huis,
Dros op, maar zonder mijn klandisie, man;
Ik dank je; zie maar, dat je ‘t elders slijt.

MORE:
Demi-cannon=Large cannon
Like an apple tart=The fashion of slits in material to reveal the colour beneath
Censer=Perfume pan with perforated lid
Masking stuff=Rich material, suitable for a masque
If you be remembered=If you recall
Kennel=Street gutter
Mar it to the time=So fashionable that it will soon be out of fashion
Quaint=Elegant
Compleat:
Demi-cannon=Een bastaard, zekere Kannon
Censer=Een reukvat, wierookvat
Kennel=Een geut
Quaint=Aardig, cierlyk, net

Burgersdijk notes:
‘t Lijkt wel een vuurpot in een scheerderswinkel. In de scheerwinkels, waar dikwijls veel menschen bijeen waren, werd reukwerk gebrand. Daartoe dienden metalen vuurpotten, censers, met opengewerkt deksel.

Topics: appearance, insult, fashion/trends, satisfaction

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
Happy thou art not;
For what thou hast not, still thou strivest to get,
And what thou hast, forget’st. Thou art not certain;
For thy complexion shifts to strange effects,
After the moon.

DUTCH:
Gelukkig zijt gij niet,
Want steeds begeert gij, wat gij niet bezit,
Vergetend wat gij hebt .

MORE:
Schmidt:
Effects=Outward manifestation, expression, show, sign, token
After=According to, conformable to
Compleat:
After=Naa, achter, volgens, naar. After this manner=Volgens (of naar) deeze manier.

Topics: satisfaction, ambition, ingratitude, uncertainty, envy

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Portia
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
He is well paid that is well satisfied;
And I, delivering you, am satisfied,
And therein do account myself well paid:
My mind was never yet more mercenary.
I pray you, know me when we meet again:
I wish you well, and so I take my leave.

DUTCH:
Die weltevreden is, is wel betaald;
Ik ben tevreden, dat ik u bevrijdde,
En reken daardoor reeds mij wel betaald

MORE:
Job satisfaction is payment enough
Satisfied=contented
Exposition=interpretation
Compleat:
To satisfy, content=Voldoen
I will content him for his pains=Ik zal hem voor zyne moeite voldoen
Satisfaction, content=Voldoening
Exposition=Uitlegging

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus
CONTEXT:
He that commends me to mine own content
Commends me to the thing I cannot get.
I to the world am like a drop of water
That in the ocean seeks another drop,
Who, falling there to find his fellow forth,
Unseen, inquisitive, confounds himself,
So I, to find a mother and a brother,
In quest of them, unhappy, lose myself.

DUTCH:
Die mij genoegen met mijzelven wenscht,
Die wenscht mij toe, wat zeker niet gebeurt.

MORE:
Content=Contentment
Find forth=Seek out
To the world=Compared with, in relation to, the world
Onions:
Confounds himself=Mingles indistinguishably with the rest, loses himself
Unhappy=Unfortunate

Compleat:
Content=Voldoening, genoegen

Topics: satisfaction, emotion and mood, wellbeing

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Avaunt! Be gone! Thou hast set me on the rack.
I swear ’tis better to be much abused
Than but to know ’t a little.
IAGO
How now, my lord!
OTHELLO
What sense had I in her stol’n hours of lust?
I saw ’t not, thought it not, it harmed not me.
I slept the next night well, fed well, was free and merry.
I found not Cassio’s kisses on her lips.
He that is robbed, not wanting what is stol’n,
Let him not know’t, and he’s not robbed at all.

DUTCH:
Wat iemand ook ontroofd zij, weet hij ‘t niet,
Verzwijg het hem en hij is niet beroofd.

MORE:
Proverb: He that is not sensible of his loss has lost nothing

Wanting=Missing
Abused=Betrayed
Sense=Mental power, faculty of thinking and feeling, spirit, mind
Compleat:
Sense=Het gevoel; gevoeligheid; besef; reden
Wanting=In gebreeke
To abuse=Misbruiken, mishandelen, kwaalyk bejegenen, beledigen, verongelyken, schelden

Topics: proverbs and idioms, betrayal, emotion and mood, satisfaction

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Lucentio
CONTEXT:
LUCENTIO
Tranio, since for the great desire I had
To see fair Padua, nursery of arts,
I am arrived for fruitful Lombardy,
The pleasant garden of great Italy,
And by my father’s love and leave am armed
With his goodwill and thy good company.
My trusty servant, well approved in all,
Here let us breathe and haply institute
A course of learning and ingenious studies.
Pisa, renownèd for grave citizens,
Gave me my being and my father first,
A merchant of great traffic through the world,
Vincentio, come of the Bentivolii.
Vincentio’s son, brought up in Florence,
It shall become to serve all hopes conceived
To deck his fortune with his virtuous deeds.
And therefore, Tranio, for the time I study
Virtue, and that part of philosophy
Will I apply that treats of happiness
By virtue specially to be achieved.
Tell me thy mind, for I have Pisa left
And am to Padua come, as he that leaves
A shallow plash to plunge him in the deep
And with satiety seeks to quench his thirst.

DUTCH:
Hier zijn we aan ‘t doel en willen ‘t pad der kennis,
Der eed’le studien inslaan, ons tot heil.

MORE:
Proverb: Lombardy is the garden of the world

Padua=Known for its university
Leave=Permission
Haply=Perhaps
Institute=Begin
Traffic=Commercial trade
Come of=Originated from
Become=Is fitting
Plash=Pool
Compleat:
To give leave=Verlof geeven, veroorloven
Give me leave to do it=Vergun het my te doen
Haply=Misschien
To institute=Instellen, inzetten
To traffic=Handel dryven, handelen
Become=Betaamen

Burgersdijk notes:
Padua, der kunsten wieg . De universiteit van Padua, in 1228 gesticht, was in Sh .’s tijd de beroemdste en meest bezochte van Italie, Petrarca, Columbus en Galilei hadden er gestudeerd.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, virtue, satisfaction, hope/optimism

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Tranio
CONTEXT:
TRANIO
Mi perdonato, gentle master mine.
I am in all affected as yourself,
Glad that you thus continue your resolve
To suck the sweets of sweet philosophy.
Only, good master, while we do admire
This virtue and this moral discipline,
Let’s be no stoics nor no stocks, I pray,
Or so devote to Aristotle’s checks
As Ovid be an outcast quite abjured.
Balk logic with acquaintance that you have,
And practice rhetoric in your common talk;
Music and poesy use to quicken you;
The mathematics and the metaphysics—
Fall to them as you find your stomach serves you.
No profit grows where is no pleasure ta’en.
In brief, sir, study what you most affect.

DUTCH:
Ik denk hierin volkomen als gijzelf,
En ben verheugd, dat ge in uw plan volhardt,
Der zoete wijsheid honigzoet te zuigen.

MORE:
Affected=Inclined
Discipline=Philosophy
Stoics=Greek philosophers who believed that perfection involved
getting rid of all emotion.
Stocks=Post or block of wood, pun on the emotionless Stoics.
Ovid=Roman love poet
Abjured=Renounced
Balk logic=Argue
Compleat:
How stands he affected=Hoe is hy geneigd?
Stoicks=Stoicynen, Stoische Philosophen
A stoick, a mere stoick (a severe or sontant man)=Een gestreng gevoelloos man
To abjure=Afzweeren
Balk=Een brok lands daar de ploeg niet overgegaan is, de opgeworpende aarde tusschen twee vooren; (shame or disgrace): Schande
To balk=Voorby gaan, daar over heen stappen, zyn woord niet houden, verongelyken, te leur stellen
He balked him not a whit=Hy zweeg niet voor hem, hy bleef hem niet schuldig

Burgersdijk notes:
Mi perdonate. Shakespeare’s tijdgenooten, Ben Jonson, Webster en vooral Marston strooiden gaarne vreemde gezegden hier en daar in hunne tooneelwerken, hijzelf doet het nagenoeg alleen in dit stuk; de schoolpedant Holofernes doet het in “Veel gemin, geen gewin” om zijne geleerdheid te
luchten.

Topics: virtue, learning/education, satisfaction

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
This is no answer, thou unfeeling man,
To excuse the current of thy cruelty.
SHYLOCK
I am not bound to please thee with my answers.

DUTCH:
Moet ik dan antwoord geven naar uw zin?

MORE:
The current=course or progress
Compleat:
The current=stroom

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King Richard III
CONTEXT:
RATCLIFFE
Thomas the earl of Surrey and himself,
Much about cockshut time, from troop to troop
Went through the army cheering up the soldiers.
RICHARD
So, I am satisfied. Give me a bowl of wine.
I have not that alacrity of spirit
Nor cheer of mind that I was wont to have.
Set it down. Is ink and paper ready?
RATCLIFFE
It is, my lord.
RICHARD
Bid my guard watch. Leave me.
Ratcliffe, about the mid of night come to my tent
And help to arm me. Leave me, I say.

DUTCH:
Ik heb ditmaal den opgewekten geest,
Den blijden moed niet, dien ik plach te hebben.

MORE:
Cockshut time=Twilight
Wont to=Customarily
Alacrity of spirit=Good cheer
Compleat:
Cock-shoot time=Schemeravond
Wont=Gewoonte
Spirit=Moed
Alacrity=Wakkerheyd, fluksheyd

Topics: satisfaction, life, age/experience, hope/optimism

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Queen Elizabeth
CONTEXT:
QUEEN ELIZABETH
My Lord of Gloucester, I have too long borne
Your blunt upbraidings and your bitter scoffs.
With those gross taunts that oft I have endured.
I had rather be a country servant-maid
Than a great queen with this condition,
To be so baited, scorned, and stormed at.
Small joy have I in being England’s queen.
QUEEN MARGARET
And lessened be that small, God I beseech Him!
Thy honour, state, and seat is due to me.

DUTCH:
Mylord van Gloster, al te lang verdroeg ik,
Uw plompen smaad en uwen bitt’ren spot ;
Bij God, ik meld nu aan zijn majesteit
Den groven hoon, then ik zoo vaak moest lijden.

MORE:
Baited=Provoked
State=Rank
Due to me=Is rightfully mine
Compleat:
To bait=Aas leggen, lokken, lok-aazen
State=De rang
There is nothing due to him=Hy heeft niets te goed

Burgersdijk notes:
Dat kleine word’ nog minder. Deze verschijning van koningin Margaretha, zij komt op en verdwijnt
als een spook, – is een dichtersvond; na den slag bij Tewksbury werd zij een poos gevangen gehouden en door haar vader Reignier vrjjgekocht; na dien tjjd betrad zij Engelands grond niet weer.

Topics: abuse, complaint, order/society, poverty and wealth, satisfaction

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Queen Elizabeth
CONTEXT:
QUEEN ELIZABETH
My Lord of Gloucester, I have too long borne
Your blunt upbraidings and your bitter scoffs.
With those gross taunts that oft I have endured.
I had rather be a country servant-maid
Than a great queen with this condition,
To be so baited, scorned, and stormed at.
Small joy have I in being England’s queen.
QUEEN MARGARET
And lessened be that small, God I beseech Him!
Thy honour, state, and seat is due to me.

DUTCH:
Mylord van Gloster, al te lang verdroeg ik,
Uw plompen smaad en uwen bitt’ren spot ;
Bij God, ik meld nu aan zijn majesteit
Den groven hoon, then ik zoo vaak moest lijden.

MORE:
Baited=Provoked
State=Rank
Due to me=Is rightfully mine
Compleat:
To bait=Aas leggen, lokken, lok-aazen
State=De rang
There is nothing due to him=Hy heeft niets te goed

Burgersdijk notes:
Dat kleine word’ nog minder. Deze verschijning van koningin Margaretha, zij komt op en verdwijnt
als een spook, – is een dichtersvond; na den slag bij Tewksbury werd zij een poos gevangen gehouden en door haar vader Reignier vrjjgekocht; na dien tjjd betrad zij Engelands grond niet weer.

Topics: abuse, complaint, order/society, poverty and wealth, satisfaction

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
And may, but how? How satisfied, my lord?
Would you, the supervision, grossly gape on,
Behold her topped?
OTHELLO
Death and damnation! Oh!
IAGO
It were a tedious difficulty, I think,
To bring them to that prospect. Damn them then,
If ever mortal eyes do see them bolster
More than their own! What then? How then?
What shall I say? Where’s satisfaction?
It is impossible you should see this,
Were they as prime as goats, as hot as monkeys,
As salt as wolves in pride, and fools as gross
As ignorance made drunk. But yet, I say,
If imputation and strong circumstances
Which lead directly to the door of truth
Will give you satisfaction, you may have ’t.
OTHELLO
Give me a living reason she’s disloyal.

DUTCH:
Toch verklaar ik: schenkt
Verdenking ooit, gesteund door sterke gronden,
Die rechtstreeks tot de poort der waarheid leiden,
U zekerheid, dan zal zij u geworden.

MORE:
Supervision=Supervisor, inspection; supernatural vision
Grossly=Stupidly
Tedious=Laborious
Bolster=Make a bolster (lie one on top of another)
Prime=Lecherous
Salt=Lecherous
Imputation=Opinion; reproach, censure
Strong circumstances=Facts (as evidence)
Door of truth=To show the truth
Compleat:
Supervisor=Overziener, naaziener
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbebouwen
You grossly mistake my meaning=Gy vergist u grootelyks omtrent myn meening
Tedious=Langwylig; verdrietig
Salt=(sault) Hitsig, ritsig, heet
Imputation=Verwyt, wyting, aantyging, lastering
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
A fact set out in all its circumstances=Een geval in alle zyne omstandigheden verhaalen

Topics: satisfaction, evidence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
I am out o’ friends, madam; and I hope to have
friends for my wife’s sake.
COUNTESS
Such friends are thine enemies, knave.
CLOWN
You’re shallow, madam, in great friends; for the
knaves come to do that for me which I am aweary of.
He that ears my land spares my team and gives me
leave to in the crop; if I be his cuckold, he’s my
drudge: he that comforts my wife is the cherisher
of my flesh and blood; he that cherishes my flesh
and blood loves my flesh and blood; he that loves my
flesh and blood is my friend: ergo, he that kisses
my wife is my friend. If men could be contented to
be what they are, there were no fear in marriage;
for young Charbon the Puritan and old Poysam the
Papist, howsome’er their hearts are severed in
religion, their heads are both one; they may jowl
horns together, like any deer i’ the herd.

DUTCH:
Als de mannen tevreden waren met te zijn wat ze zijn, zou niemand in het huwelijk iets duchten.

MORE:
Proverb: Young flesh and old fish are best
Proverb: Hearts may agree though heads differ
Shallow=Shallow of understanding
In great friends=About great friends; ingrate friends
Charbon (Chair bonne) (for Puritans who were opposed to fasting)
Poysam (Poisson) (appropriate for Roman Catholics)
Ears=Ploughs
To in=Gather, collect: “to in the crop”
Howsome’er=Howsoever
Jowl=Lock horns
Compleat:
To ear=Land bouwen
Cuckold=Hoorndraager
Drudge=Iemand die het vuilste en slobbigste werk doet

Topics: marriage, friendship, satisfaction

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Lucentio
CONTEXT:
LUCENTIO
Tranio, since for the great desire I had
To see fair Padua, nursery of arts,
I am arrived for fruitful Lombardy,
The pleasant garden of great Italy,
And by my father’s love and leave am armed
With his goodwill and thy good company.
My trusty servant, well approved in all,
Here let us breathe and haply institute
A course of learning and ingenious studies.
Pisa, renownèd for grave citizens,
Gave me my being and my father first,
A merchant of great traffic through the world,
Vincentio, come of the Bentivolii.
Vincentio’s son, brought up in Florence,
It shall become to serve all hopes conceived
To deck his fortune with his virtuous deeds.
And therefore, Tranio, for the time I study
Virtue, and that part of philosophy
Will I apply that treats of happiness
By virtue specially to be achieved.
Tell me thy mind, for I have Pisa left
And am to Padua come, as he that leaves
A shallow plash to plunge him in the deep
And with satiety seeks to quench his thirst.

DUTCH:
t Betaamt Vincentio’s zoon, die in Florence
Werd opgevoed, dat hij, zooals men wacht,
Door edel doen zijn rijkdom glans verleen’.

MORE:
Proverb: Lombardy is the garden of the world

Padua=Known for its university
Leave=Permission
Haply=Perhaps
Institute=Begin
Traffic=Commercial trade
Come of=Originated from
Become=Is fitting
Plash=Pool
Compleat:
To give leave=Verlof geeven, veroorloven
Give me leave to do it=Vergun het my te doen
Haply=Misschien
To institute=Instellen, inzetten
To traffic=Handel dryven, handelen
Become=Betaamen

Burgersdijk notes:
Padua, der kunsten wieg . De universiteit van Padua, in 1228 gesticht, was in Sh .’s tijd de beroemdste en meest bezochte van Italie, Petrarca, Columbus en Galilei hadden er gestudeerd.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, virtue, satisfaction, hope/optimism

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Brabantio
CONTEXT:
DUKE
Valiant Othello, we must straight employ you
Against the general enemy Ottoman—
I did not see you. Welcome, gentle signior.
We lacked your counsel and your help tonight.
BRABANTIO
So did I yours. Good your grace, pardon me.
Neither my place nor aught I heard of business
Hath raised me from my bed, nor doth the general care
Take hold on me, for my particular grief
Is of so flood-gate and o’erbearing nature
That it engluts and swallows other sorrows
And it is still itself.

DUTCH:
Zoo ik uw hulp. Genadig heer, vergeef mij,
Geen ambtszaak, geen gerucht van wat hier omging,
Riep van mijn bed mij op; geen staatszorg is ‘t,
Die mij vervult;

MORE:
Straight=Immediately
Lacked=Missed
Englut=Engulf
Place=Duty
Floodgate=Overwhelming
Compleat:
Straightway=Eenswegs, terstond, opstaandevoet
To lack=Ontbreeken, van noode hebben
To englut=Verkroppen
Floud-gate=Sluys, doortogt

Topics: emotion and mood, work, satisfaction, sorrow

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Tranio
CONTEXT:
TRANIO
Mi perdonato, gentle master mine.
I am in all affected as yourself,
Glad that you thus continue your resolve
To suck the sweets of sweet philosophy.
Only, good master, while we do admire
This virtue and this moral discipline,
Let’s be no stoics nor no stocks, I pray,
Or so devote to Aristotle’s checks
As Ovid be an outcast quite abjured.
Balk logic with acquaintance that you have,
And practice rhetoric in your common talk;
Music and poesy use to quicken you;
The mathematics and the metaphysics—
Fall to them as you find your stomach serves you.
No profit grows where is no pleasure ta’en.
In brief, sir, study what you most affect.

DUTCH:
Want niets gedijt, als lust en liefde ontbreekt;
In ‘t kort, studeer wat u bet meest behaagt.

MORE:
Affected=Inclined
Discipline=Philosophy
Stoics=Greek philosophers who believed that perfection involved
getting rid of all emotion.
Stocks=Post or block of wood, pun on the emotionless Stoics.
Ovid=Roman love poet
Abjured=Renounced
Balk logic=Argue
Compleat:
How stands he affected=Hoe is hy geneigd?
Stoicks=Stoicynen, Stoische Philosophen
A stoick, a mere stoick (a severe or sontant man)=Een gestreng gevoelloos man
To abjure=Afzweeren
Balk=Een brok lands daar de ploeg niet overgegaan is, de opgeworpende aarde tusschen twee vooren; (shame or disgrace): Schande
To balk=Voorby gaan, daar over heen stappen, zyn woord niet houden, verongelyken, te leur stellen
He balked him not a whit=Hy zweeg niet voor hem, hy bleef hem niet schuldig

Burgersdijk notes:
Mi perdonate. Shakespeare’s tijdgenooten, Ben Jonson, Webster en vooral Marston strooiden gaarne vreemde gezegden hier en daar in hunne tooneelwerken, hijzelf doet het nagenoeg alleen in dit stuk; de schoolpedant Holofernes doet het in “Veel gemin, geen gewin” om zijne geleerdheid te
luchten.

Topics: virtue, learning/education, satisfaction

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Old Lady
CONTEXT:
ANNE
So much the more
Must pity drop upon her. Verily,
I swear, ’tis better to be lowly born,
And range with humble livers in content,
Than to be perk’d up in a glistering grief,
And wear a golden sorrow.
OLD LADY
Our content
Is our best having.

DUTCH:
Tevredenheid is ‘t hoogste goed.

MORE:
Perked=Dressed up
Range=Consort (with)
Humble livers=People who live simply
Compleat:
To perk up=Opkomen, zich oprechten
To range up and down=Heen en weer loopen

Topics: satisfaction, fashion/trends

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Helen
CONTEXT:
HELEN
Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
Which we ascribe to heaven: the fated sky
Gives us free scope, only doth backward pull
Our slow designs when we ourselves are dull.
What power is it which mounts my love so high,
That makes me see, and cannot feed mine eye?
The mightiest space in fortune nature brings
To join like likes and kiss like native things.
Impossible be strange attempts to those
That weigh their pains in sense and do suppose
What hath been cannot be: who ever strove
To show her merit, that did miss her love?
The king’s disease—my project may deceive me,
But my intents are fix’d and will not leave me.

DUTCH:
Vaak vinden we in onszelf de hulp en baat,
Die wij den hemel vragen. ‘t Noodlot laat
Den weg ons vrij, en spert dien enkel dan,
Wanneer wij loom en traag zijn, zonder plan.

MORE:
Proverb: Like will to like (“To join like likes”)
Fated=Fateful (see also King Lear “The plagues that hang fated over men’s faults”, 3.2)
Mightiest space in fortune=Greatest difference in social rank
Weigh their pains=Count the cost
In sense=In advance
Miss=Fail to gain
Compleat:
Fated=Door ‘t noodlot beschooren

Topics: independence, fate/destiny , remedy, satisfaction, achievement, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Nerissa
CONTEXT:
NERISSA
You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries were in the
same abundance as your good fortunes are. And yet for
aught I see, they are as sick that surfeit with too much
as they that starve with nothing. It is no mean
happiness, therefore, to be seated in the mean.
Superfluity comes sooner by white hairs, but competency
lives longer.
PORTIA
Good sentences, and well pronounced.
NERISSA
They would be better if well followed.

DUTCH:
Het is daarom geen middelmatig geluk juist in de middelmaat
te zijn; overvloed krijgt vroeger grijze haren, maar juist van pas leeft langer.

MORE:
Superfluity=Surplus
Comes sooner by=Acquires sooner (to come by something)
Sentences=Maxims
Compleat:
Superfluity=Overtolligheyd, overvloedigheyd
Sentence=Spreuk, zinspreuk

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Tailor
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
O monstrous arrogance! Thou liest, thou thread, thou
thimble,
Thou yard, three-quarters, half-yard, quarter, nail!
Thou flea, thou nit, thou winter cricket thou!
Braved in mine own house with a skein of thread?
Away, thou rag, thou quantity, thou remnant,
Or I shall so be-mete thee with thy yard
As thou shalt think on prating whilst thou liv’st!
I tell thee, I, that thou hast marred her gown.
TAILOR
Your Worship is deceived. The gown is made
Just as my master had direction.
Grumio gave order how it should be done.
GRUMIO
I gave him no order. I gave him the stuff.
TAILOR
But how did you desire it should be made?
GRUMIO
Marry, sir, with needle and thread.
TAILOR
But did you not request to have it cut?
GRUMIO
Thou hast faced many things.
TAILOR
I have.
GRUMIO
Face not me. Thou hast braved many men; brave not me. I
will neither be faced nor braved. I say unto thee, I
bid thy master cut out the gown, but I did not bid him
cut it to pieces. Ergo, thou liest.
TAILOR
Why, here is the note of the fashion to testify.

DUTCH:
Uw edelheid vergist zich; ‘t is gemaakt,
Precies zooals ‘t mijn meester werd besteld.
Hier, Grumio, gaf heel op, hoe ‘t wezen moest.

MORE:
Nail=Measure of cloth
Nit=Louse egg
Brave=(1) to “dress in fine clothes”; (2) “to defy.”
Yard=Measuring stick
Quantity=Fragment
Be-mete=Measure
Prating=Talking
Stuff=Material
Whilst=For as long as
Compleat:
Nail (one eighth of an ell)=De agste deel van een el
Nit=Een neet
To brave=Trotsen, braveeren, trotseeren; moedig treeden
To prate=Praaten. Prate and prattle=Keffen en snappen. Prate foolishly=Mal praaten

Topics: insult, fashion/trends, work, satisfaction

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
MACDUFF
I know this is a joyful trouble to you,
But yet ’tis one.
MACBETH
The labor we delight in physics pain.
This is the door.
MACDUFF
I’ll make so bold to call,
For ’tis my limited service.

DUTCH:
Het is u, ‘k weet het, vreugdevolle moeite,
Doch moeite blijft het.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Physics=Is a remedy for
Compleat:
Physick=Artseny, medicyn, geneesmiddel
To physick=Geneesmiddelen gebruiken, medicineeren

Topics: work, remedy, satisfaction

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Dromio of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
The plainer dealer, the sooner lost. Yet he loseth it in a kind of jollity.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
For what reason?
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
For two, and sound ones too.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Nay, not sound, I pray you.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Sure ones, then.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Nay, not sure, in a thing falsing.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Certain ones, then.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Name them.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
The one, to save the money that he spends in tiring; the other, that at dinner they should not drop in his porridge.

DUTCH:
Hoe onnoozeler iemand is, des te eer zorgt hij het
kwijt te raken; maar hij verliest het met een soort van
genot.

MORE:
Proverb: The properer (honester) man the worse luck

Ref also to plain dealing and double dealing
Falsing=Deceptive
Tiring=Hairdressing
Sound=Both ‘valid’ and ‘healthy’

Compleat:
Plain dealing=Oprechte handeling
To tire=Optoooijen, de kap zetten
Sound (healthful)=Gezond
Sound (whole)=Gaaf
Sound (judicious)=Verstandig, schrander, gegrond

Topics: honesty, gullibility, satisfaction, fate/destiny, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
You, Polydor, have proved best woodman and
Are master of the feast. Cadwal and I
Will play the cook and servant; ’tis our match.
The sweat of industry would dry and die
But for the end it works to. Come, our stomachs
Will make what’s homely savoury. Weariness
Can snore upon the flint when resty sloth
Finds the down pillow hard. Now peace be here,
Poor house, that keep’st thyself.

DUTCH:
Het loon verzoet den arbeid; zonder dat
Zou ‘t vuur allicht verdooven


Woodman=Hunter
Match=Compact
Resty is an obsolete form of restive (Century Dictionary: “By transition through the sense ‘impatient under restraint,’ and partly by confusion with ‘restless,’ the word has taken in
present use the additional sense ‘restless.'”)
Onions defines restive as inactive, inert and sluggish (rusty).
Schmidt explains resty sloth as “stiff with too much rest”, comparing “resty-stiff” in Edward III.

Compleat:
Wood-men=Oppassers in des Konings bosschaagie, boomsnoeijers
Match (bargain)=Koop, onderhandeling, overeenstemming
Restive/Resty (froward, stubborn)=Stug, koppig
A resty horse=Een paerd dat niet voort wil of zich niet wil laaten regeeren

Topics: money, honesty, poverty and wealth, work, satisfaction

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
There be some sports are painful, and their labour
Delight in them sets off. Some kinds of baseness
Are nobly undergone. And most poor matters
Point to rich ends. This my mean task
Would be as heavy to me as odious, but
The mistress which I serve quickens what’s dead
And makes my labours pleasures. Oh, she is
Ten times more gentle than her father’s crabbed,
And he’s composed of harshness. I must remove
Some thousands of these logs and pile them up,
Upon a sore injunction. My sweet mistress
Weeps when she sees me work, and says such baseness
Had never like executor. I forget,
But these sweet thoughts do even refresh my labours,
Most busiest when I do it.

DUTCH:
Vermaken zijn er, die vermoeien, ‘t zwoegen
Verhoogt den lust er van; soms wordt verneed’ring
Met eer verduurd en voert ook het geringste
Tot heerlijke uitkomst

MORE:
Baseness=Low rank manual labour
Mean=humble
Heavy=Sorrowful, grievous
Quickens=Enlivens
Sore injunction=Harsh command
Crabbed=Churlish, morose
Compleat:
Baseness=Laagheid, lafhartigheid; Geringheid
Mean=Gering, slecht
Heavy (sasd)=Droevig, verdrietig
The burden lay sore upon me=De last lag zwaar op my (of drukte my zeer)
Crabbed=Wrang, stuursch, kribbig, nors, korzel
A crabbed fellow=Een norse vent

Topics: work, status, civility, satisfaction, money

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
Thoughts tending to content flatter themselves
That they are not the first of fortune’s slaves,
Nor shall not be the last; like silly beggars
Who sitting in the stocks refuge their shame,
That many have and others must sit there;
And in this thought they find a kind of ease,
Bearing their own misfortunes on the back
Of such as have before endured the like.
Thus play I in one person many people,
And none contented: sometimes am I king;
Then treasons make me wish myself a beggar,
And so I am: then crushing penury
Persuades me I was better when a king;
Then am I king’d again: and by and by
Think that I am unking’d by Bolingbroke,
And straight am nothing: but whate’er I be,
Nor I nor any man that but man is
With nothing shall be pleased, till he be eased
With being nothing. Music do I hear?

DUTCH:
Zoo speel ik veel personen, gansch alleen,
Nooit een tevreed’ne

MORE:

Proverb: I am not the first and shall not be the last

Refuge=Protection from danger, expedient in distress

Compleat:
Refuge=Toevlugt, wyk, schuilplaats

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, poverty and wealth, money, satisfaction

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Holland
CONTEXT:
HOLLAND
True; and yet it is said, labour in thy vocation; which is as much to say as, let the magistrates be labouring men; and therefore should we be magistrates.
BEVIS
Thou hast hit it; for there’s no better sign of a brave mind than a hard hand.

DUTCH:
Zoo is het; en toch is het zeggen: „werk in uw beroep”;
wat zoo veel wil zeggen als: „laat de overheden
werklieden zijn “; en daarom moesten wij eigenlijk overheden
zijn.

MORE:

Proverb: Everyone must walk (labour) in his own calling (vocation)

Labouring=Working
Hit it=Hit the nail on the head
Hard=Calloused

Topics: proverbs and idioms, work, satisfaction

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
God’s bodykins, man, much better. Use every man after his desert, and who should ’scape whipping? 
Use them after your own honour and dignity. The less they deserve, the more merit is in thy bounty. Take them in.

DUTCH:
Zoo ge ieder mensch naar zijn verdienste woudt behandelen, wie ontkomt dan de zweep? Behandel ze overeenkomstig uw eigen eer een waardigheid/
Als ge iedereen naar verdiensten behandelt, wie ontkomt dan een pak slaag? Behandel hen overeenkomstig uw eigen stand en waardigheid

MORE:
Whipping was a cruel punishment. In the days of Henry VIII an Act decreed that vagrants were to be carried to some market town, or other place, and there tied to the end of a cart, naked, and beaten with whips throughout such market-town, or other place, till the body should be bloody by reason of such whipping. The punishment was mitigated in Elizabeth’s reign, to the extent that vagrants need only to be “stripped naked from the middle upwards and whipped till the body should be bloody”.
Schmidt:
Desért=that which is due to a person; that which entitles to a reward, or demands a punishment
Compleat:
Desert (from to deserve)=Verdienste, verdiende loon

Topics: satisfaction, honour

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
You, Polydor, have proved best woodman and
Are master of the feast. Cadwal and I
Will play the cook and servant; ’tis our match.
The sweat of industry would dry and die
But for the end it works to. Come, our stomachs
Will make what’s homely savoury. Weariness
Can snore upon the flint when resty sloth
Finds the down pillow hard. Now peace be here,
Poor house, that keep’st thyself.

DUTCH:
Komt, de honger
Kruide ons eenvoudig maal; vermoeidheid snurkt
Gerust op harde rots, en loome luiheid
Vindt donzen bedden hard.


Woodman=Hunter
Match=Compact
Resty is an obsolete form of restive (Century Dictionary: “By transition through the sense ‘impatient under restraint,’ and partly by confusion with ‘restless,’ the word has taken in present use the additional sense ‘restless.'”)
Onions defines restive as inactive, inert and sluggish (rusty).
Schmidt explains resty sloth as “stiff with too much rest”, comparing “resty-stiff” in Edward III.

Compleat:
Wood-men=Oppassers in des Konings bosschaagie, boomsnoeijers
Match (bargain)=Koop, onderhandeling, overeenstemming
Restive/Resty (froward, stubborn)=Stug, koppig
A resty horse=Een paerd dat niet voort wil of zich niet wil laaten regeeren

Topics: contract, work, satisfaction

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