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PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Helen
CONTEXT:
HELEN
Nor you, mistress,
Ever a friend whose thoughts more truly labour
To recompense your love: doubt not but heaven
Hath brought me up to be your daughter’s dower,
As it hath fated her to be my motive
And helper to a husband. But, O strange men!
That can such sweet use make of what they hate,
When saucy trusting of the cozen’d thoughts
Defiles the pitchy night: so lust doth play
With what it loathes for that which is away.
But more of this hereafter. You, Diana,
Under my poor instructions yet must suffer
Something in my behalf.
DIANA
Let death and honesty
Go with your impositions, I am yours
Upon your will to suffer.
HELEN
Yet, I pray you:
But with the word the time will bring on summer,
When briers shall have leaves as well as thorns,
And be as sweet as sharp. We must away;
Our wagon is prepared, and time revives us:
All’s well that ends well; still the fine’s the crown;
Whate’er the course, the end is the renown.

DUTCH:
Komt, wij moeten heen ;
De wagen staat gereed; de tjd baart rozen;
Eind goed, al goed; aan ‘t einde hangt de kroon;
De loop zij zwaar, het einde brengt het loon.


MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
In Re San Juan Dupont Plaza Hotel Fire Litigation, 907 F.2d 4, 6 (1st Cir. 1990)(per
curiam); Collett v. State, 133 Ga. App. 318, 211 S.E.2d 198 (Ga. Ct. App: 1974).

Proverb: All’s Well that Ends Well
Proverb: The end crowns (tries) all
Objective achieved; problems experienced along the way can be forgotten.
Shakespeare didn’t invent this; the earliest known version in print is from the 13th century, in The proverbs and idioms of Hendyng.
Fine=End, conclusion
Revive=To bring again to life, to reanimate
Compleat:
In fine=Eindelyk, ten laatsten
Revive=Herleeven, doen herleeven, weder bekomen, verquikken

Topics: cited in law, purpose, achievement, time, nature, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Aegeon
CONTEXT:
O, grief hath changed me since you saw me last,
And careful hours with time’s deformèd hand
Have written strange defeatures in my face.
But tell me yet, dost thou not know my voice?

DUTCH:
Door zorgvolle uren heeft de maag’re hand
Des Tijds mij vreemde trekken ingegrift

MORE:
Schmidt:
Defeatures=Disfigurements
Careful=Full of cares, subject to anxiety, sorrow, or want

Topics: time, age/experience, sorrow, appearance, grief

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
JAQUES
A fool, a fool, I met a fool i’ th’ forest,
A motley fool. A miserable world!
As I do live by food, I met a fool,
Who laid him down and basked him in the sun
And railed on Lady Fortune in good terms,
In good set terms, and yet a motley fool.
“Good morrow, fool,” quoth I. “No, sir,” quoth he,
“Call me not ‘fool’ till heaven hath sent me fortune.”
And then he drew a dial from his poke
And, looking on it with lackluster eye,
Says very wisely, “It is ten o’clock.
Thus we may see,” quoth he, “how the world wags.
‘Tis but an hour ago since it was nine,
And after one hour more ’twill be eleven.
And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe,
And then from hour to hour we rot and rot,
And thereby hangs a tale.” When I did hear
The motley fool thus moral on the time,
My lungs began to crow like chanticleer
That fools should be so deep-contemplative,
And I did laugh sans intermission
An hour by his dial. O noble fool!
A worthy fool! Motley’s the only wear.

DUTCH:
En keek er op met somb’ren, doffen blik

MORE:
Proverb: Thereby hangs (lies) a tale
Proverb: Fortune favours fools

Motley=Multicoloured jester outfit
Set=Composed
Rail=To use reproachful language, to scold in opprobrious terms
Poke=Pouch or pocket
Lacklustre=Lacking radiance, gloss or brightness (Latin lustrare).
Dial=(Fob)watch
Poke=Pouch, pocket
Moral=Moralise
Deep=Profoundly
Chanticleer=Rooster
Compleat:
Motley=Een grove gemengelde
To rail=Schelden
To wag (to move or stir)=Schudden, beweegen
Poke=Zak
Lustre=Luyster
Dial=Wysplaat
To moralize=Een zedelyke uitlegging of toepassing op iets maaken
Deep=Diepzinnig

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, blame, nature, time

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
PETO
The King your father is at Westminster,
And there are twenty weak and wearied posts
Come from the north, and as I came along
I met and overtook a dozen captains,
Bareheaded, sweating, knocking at the taverns
And asking everyone for Sir John Falstaff.
PRINCE HENRY
By heaven, Poins, I feel me much to blame
So idly to profane the precious time
When tempest of commotion, like the south
Borne with black vapour, doth begin to melt
And drop upon our bare unarmèd heads.—
Give me my sword and cloak.—Falstaff, good night.

DUTCH:
Bij God, Poins, ik gevoel mij zeer te laken;
Dat ik den eed’len tijd zoo wuft ontwijd

MORE:
Posts=Messengers
Bareheaded=Not properly dressed in public
Commotion=Tumult, sedition; violent weather

Compleat:
Post (messenger that carries lettrrs)=Een post, boode
Bareheaded=Blootshoofds
Commotion=Beweeging, beroerte, oproer, oploop

Topics: time, preparation

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Dromio of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
By what rule, sir?
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Marry, sir, by a rule as plain as the plain bald pate of Father
Time himself.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Let’s hear it.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
There’s no time for a man to recover his hair that grows bald by nature.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
May he not do it by fine and recovery?
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Yes, to pay a fine for a periwig, and recover the lost hair of another man.

DUTCH:
Wel, heer, op een grond zoo glad als de gladde kale
kop van Vader Tijd zelf.

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Proverb: Take time (occasion) by the forelock, for she is bald behind

Father Time, the personification of Time as a more ‘friendly’ version than personification with a scythe or the Grim Reaper.
Plain (1) open, clear, simplet; (2) even, level, smooth
Fine and recovery. In old English law, “fine” meant “an amicable composition or agreement of astute, either actual or fictitious, by leave of the King or his justices”. Fines and Recoveries were used to circumvent the Statute of Entail, which tended to restrict the free transfer of land, by “suffering a feigned recovery” or “levying a fine”. There was a particular appeal for theatre audiences in the farcicality of the process (alluded to by Shakespeare in three plays: The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Comedy
of Errors and Hamlet).

Compleat:
Plain (even, smooth, flat)=Vlak, effen
A plain superficies=Een gelyke oppervlakte
Plain (clear)=Klaar, duidelyk

Topics: time, invented or popularised, still in use, law/legal

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
DROMIO OF EPHESUS
I pray you, jest, sir, as you sit at dinner.
I from my mistress come to you in post;
If I return, I shall be post indeed,
For she will scour your fault upon my pate.
Methinks your maw, like mine, should be your clock,
And strike you home without a messenger.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Come, Dromio, come, these jests are out of season.
Reserve them till a merrier hour than this.
Where is the gold I gave in charge to thee?
DROMIO OF EPHESUS
To me, sir? Why, you gave no gold to me!
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Come on, sir knave, have done your foolishness,
And tell me how thou hast disposed thy charge.

DUTCH:
Kom, Dromio, kom, ontijdig is die scherts;
Bewaar ze tot ik vroolijker gestemd ben.
Waar is het goud, dat ik u toevertrouwde?

MORE:
Out of season=Badly timed, inconvenient
Jest=Each believes the other to be joking (in ‘sportive humour’). The confusion about the delivery of a gold chain is a reference to a cause célèbre case in 1591 and 1592, Underwood v Manwood. This would have been appreciated by an audience in Gray’s Inn in 1594.
Maw=appetite

Compleat:
Maw=Maag
Out of season=Uit de tyd
To jest=Boerten, schertsen, jokken, gekscheeren

Topics: time, debt/obligation, misunderstanding, dispute

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
Nor need’st thou much importune me to that
Whereon this month I have been hammering.
I have considered well his loss of time
And how he cannot be a perfect man,
Not being tried and tutored in the world:
Experience is by industry achieved
And perfected by the swift course of time.
Then tell me, whither were I best to send him?

DUTCH:
Ervaring wordt door vlijt en moeite erlangd,
En door den snellen gang des tijds gerijpt.
Doch spreek, waar zou ik best hem henen zenden?

MORE:
Hammering=Pondering
Industry=Assiduity, zealous activity
Importune=Urge, impel
Compleat:
To hammer out a thing=Iets met groote moeite bewerken
Importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen
Industry=Nyverheid, vytigheid, kloekzinnigheid, vernuftigheid
Industry (wit)=Behendigheid
To tutor=Berispen, bestraffen

Topics: learning/education, age/experience, time, work

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Proteus
CONTEXT:
PROTEUS
Here is my hand for my true constancy;
And when that hour o’erslips me in the day
Wherein I sigh not, Julia, for thy sake,
The next ensuing hour some foul mischance
Torment me for my love’s forgetfulness!
My father stays my coming; answer not;
The tide is now: nay, not thy tide of tears;
That tide will stay me longer than I should.
Julia, farewell!
PROTEUS
What, gone without a word?
Ay, so true love should do: it cannot speak;
For truth hath better deeds than words to grace it.

DUTCH:
Ja, zoo doet trouwe liefde; zwijgen moet zij,
Want daden zijn de tooi der trouw, niet woorden.

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Proverb: Actions speak louder than words

True constancy=Fidelity
O’erslips=Passes
Mischance=Misfortune
Stays=Awaits
Stay=Delay
Grace=Adorn
Compleat:
Constancy=Standvastigheid, volharding, bestendigheid
Overslip=Laaten duurslippen
Mischance=Misval, mislukking, ongeval, ongeluk
To stay=Wachten, stil staan, stil houden, vertoeven; stuyten
To grace=Vercieren, bevallig maaken

Topics: proverbs and idioms, truth, time, love

PLAY: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Hippolyta
CONTEXT:
THESEUS
Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hour
Draws on apace. Four happy days bring in
Another moon. But oh, methinks how slow
This old moon wanes! She lingers my desires,
Like to a stepdame or a dowager
Long withering out a young man’s revenue.
HIPPOLYTA
Four days will quickly steep themselves in night.
Four nights will quickly dream away the time.
And then the moon, like to a silver bow
New bent in heaven, shall behold the night
Of our solemnities.
THESEUS
Go, Philostrate,
Stir up the Athenian youth to merriments.
Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth.
Turn melancholy forth to funerals.
The pale companion is not for our pomp.

DUTCH:
Vier dagen, zij verzinken snel in nacht;
Vier nachten, zij verdroomen snel den tijd;
Dan wordt op nieuw de zilvren boog der maan
Gespannen aan den hemel, en beschouwt
De nacht van ons festijn.

MORE:
Hippolyta=Legendary Queen of the Amazons, women warriors.
Steep themselves=Pass into, be absorbed in
Lingers=Delays
Stepdame=Stepmother
Solemnities=Ceremony
Companion=Fellow, emotion
Compleat:
Steep=Indoopen, te weeken leggel
Linger=Leuteren, draalen, sammelen
Solemnities=Plegtigheyd, hoogtyd, feestelykheyd
Companion=Medegezel, medegenoot, maat, makker”

Topics: time, emotion and mood, nature

PLAY: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Hippolyta
CONTEXT:
THESEUS
Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hour
Draws on apace. Four happy days bring in
Another moon. But oh, methinks how slow
This old moon wanes! She lingers my desires,
Like to a stepdame or a dowager
Long withering out a young man’s revenue.
HIPPOLYTA
Four days will quickly steep themselves in night.
Four nights will quickly dream away the time.
And then the moon, like to a silver bow
New bent in heaven, shall behold the night
Of our solemnities.
THESEUS
Go, Philostrate,
Stir up the Athenian youth to merriments.
Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth.
Turn melancholy forth to funerals.
The pale companion is not for our pomp.

DUTCH:
Vier nachten, zij verdroomen snel den tijd;
Dan wordt op nieuw de zilvren boog der maan
Gespannen aan den hemel, en beschouwt
De nacht van ons festijn.

MORE:
Hippolyta=Legendary Queen of the Amazons, women warriors.
Steep themselves=Pass into, be absorbed in
Lingers=Delays
Stepdame=Stepmother
Solemnities=Ceremony
Companion=Fellow, emotion
Compleat:
Steep=Indoopen, te weeken leggel
Linger=Leuteren, draalen, sammelen
Solemnities=Plegtigheyd, hoogtyd, feestelykheyd
Companion=Medegezel, medegenoot, maat, makker”

Topics: time, emotion and mood, nature

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Henry Bolingbroke
CONTEXT:
JOHN OF GAUNT
O, to what purpose dost thou hoard thy words,
That thou return’st no greeting to thy friends?
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
I have too few to take my leave of you,
When the tongue’s office should be prodigal
To breathe the abundant dolour of the heart.
JOHN OF GAUNT
Thy grief is but thy absence for a time.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Joy absent, grief is present for that time.
JOHN OF GAUNT
What is six winters? they are quickly gone.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
To men in joy; but grief makes one hour ten.

DUTCH:
Voor vreugde; smart vertienvoudt ieder uur.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Prodigal=Lavish, profuse
Dolour=Grief

Compleat:
Prodigal=Quistig, verquistend
Dolor=Droefheid, smerte

Topics: grief, language, sorrow, time

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
What hope is there of his majesty’s amendment?
LAFEW
He hath abandoned his physicians, madam; under whose
practices he hath persecuted time with hope, and
finds no other advantage in the process but only the
losing of hope by time.
COUNTESS
This young gentlewoman had a father, —O, that
‘had’! how sad a passage ’tis! —whose skill was
almost as great as his honesty; had it stretched so
far, would have made nature immortal, and death
should have play for lack of work. Would, for the
king’s sake, he were living! I think it would be
the death of the king’s disease.

DUTCH:
Hij heeft aan zijne artsen hun afscheid gegeven, mevrouw, nadat hij onder hunne behandeling den tijd met hoop vervolgd had, en er op den duur geen ander voordeel van heeft, dan dat hij met den tijd de hoop verloor.

MORE:
Amendment=Recovery
Persecute=To afflict, to harass; not very intelligibly used.
Persecuted time with hope=Wasted his time hoping for a cure.
Passage=Punning on passing
Compleat:
Persecute=Lastig vallen; vervolgen.

Topics: hope/optimism, remedy, time, trust, life, death

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
How art thou out of breath when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
The excuse that thou dost make in this delay
Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse.
Is thy news good, or bad? Answer to that.
Say either, and I’ll stay the circumstance.
Let me be satisfied. Is ’t good or bad?

DUTCH:
Gij buiten adem? en gij hebt toch adem,
Dat gij me uw buiten-adem-zijn vertelt?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Stay=Wait for
Circumstance=Particulars, detail
Compleat:
Stay (to tarry or sejourn)=Verblyven
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
A fact set out in all its circumstances=Een geval in alle zyne omsandigheden verhaalen.

Topics: time, good and bad, reason, reply, truth

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Henry Bolingbroke
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Uncle, even in the glasses of thine eyes
I see thy grieved heart: thy sad aspect
Hath from the number of his banish’d years
Pluck’d four away.
Six frozen winter spent,
Return with welcome home from banishment.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
How long a time lies in one little word!
Four lagging winters and four wanton springs
End in a word: such is the breath of kings.

DUTCH:
Wat tijd en macht ligt in een enkel woord!
Vier trage winters en vier dartle Mei’s
Zijn adem, niets, — doet hun een vorst dien eisch.

MORE:

Proverb: The eye is the window of the heart (mind)

Schmidt:
Glasses of thine eyes=Eyeballs
Aspect=Look, glance; possible reference to astrology, with the aspect being the position of one planet in relation to others and its potential to exert influence
Wanton=Bountiful, luxuriant

Compleat:
Aspect=Gezigt, gelaat, aanschouw, stargezigt
Of fierce aspect=Van een straf gelaat

Topics: time, nature, punishment, appearance, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cloten
CONTEXT:
I am glad I was up so late, for that’s the
reason I was up so early: he cannot choose
but take this service I have done fatherly.

DUTCH:
Ik ben blij, dat ik zoo laat op was; want dit is de
reden, dat ik zoo vroeg op was.


Take this service (…) fatherly=Accept this good deed as a father would

Topics: time, preparation

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
Truly, young gentlemen, though there was no great
matter in the ditty, yet the note was very untunable.
FIRST PAGE
You are deceived, sir.
We kept time. We lost not our time.
TOUCHSTONE
By my troth, yes. I count it but time lost to hear such
a foolish song. God be wi’ you, and God mend your
voices.— Come, Audrey.

DUTCH:
Neen, waarachtig, het is zoo; en ik kon ook wel beter acht slaan op mijn tijd, in plaats van naar zulk een mal liedjen te luisteren. Nu, God zegene u en verbetere uw stemmen!

MORE:
Untunable=Unharmonious, discordant
Compleat:
Untunable=Misluydend

Burgersdijk notes:
Zet u tusschen ons in. In ‘t Engelsch staat: sit i’ the middle. Zeker is dit wel een toespeling op het oud Engelsch zeggen: Hey diddle diddle, fool in the middle.

Topics: time, deceit

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
JAQUES
A fool, a fool, I met a fool i’ th’ forest,
A motley fool. A miserable world!
As I do live by food, I met a fool,
Who laid him down and basked him in the sun
And railed on Lady Fortune in good terms,
In good set terms, and yet a motley fool.
“Good morrow, fool,” quoth I. “No, sir,” quoth he,
“Call me not ‘fool’ till heaven hath sent me fortune.”
And then he drew a dial from his poke
And, looking on it with lackluster eye,
Says very wisely, “It is ten o’clock.
Thus we may see,” quoth he, “how the world wags.
‘Tis but an hour ago since it was nine,
And after one hour more ’twill be eleven.
And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe,
And then from hour to hour we rot and rot,
And thereby hangs a tale.” When I did hear
The motley fool thus moral on the time,
My lungs began to crow like chanticleer
That fools should be so deep-contemplative,
And I did laugh sans intermission
An hour by his dial. O noble fool!
A worthy fool! Motley’s the only wear.

DUTCH:
Toen die nar
Zoo tijdsbespiegelingen hield, begonnen
Mijn longen luid te kraaien als een haan,
Dat narren soms zoo diepe denkers zijn;
En ‘k lachte, lachte, lachte, op ‘t uurwerk af,
Wel ruim een uur.

MORE:
Proverb: Thereby hangs (lies) a tale
Proverb: Fortune favours fools

Motley=Multicoloured jester outfit
Set=Composed
Rail=To use reproachful language, to scold in opprobrious terms
Poke=Pouch or pocket
Lacklustre=Lacking radiance, gloss or brightness (Latin lustrare).
Dial=(Fob)watch
Poke=Pouch, pocket
Moral=Moralise
Deep=Profoundly
Chanticleer=Rooster
Compleat:
Motley=Een grove gemengelde
To rail=Schelden
To wag (to move or stir)=Schudden, beweegen
Poke=Zak
Lustre=Luyster
Dial=Wysplaat
To moralize=Een zedelyke uitlegging of toepassing op iets maaken
Deep=Diepzinnig

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, blame, nature, time

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
I have almost forgot the taste of fears.
The time has been my senses would have cooled
To hear a night-shriek, and my fell of hair
Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir
As life were in ’t. I have supped full with horrors.
Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts
Cannot once start me.

DUTCH:
k Heb schier vergeten, hoe het vreezen smaakt.

MORE:
Onions:
Fell=Skin, covering
Schmidt:
Treatise=Discourse, talk, tale
Dismal=Striking the mind with sorrow or dismay
Compleat:
Treatise=Een verhandeling, traktaat
Dismal=Schrikkelyk, gruuwelyk, yslyk, overdroevig, naar
Fell (skin)=Vel, huid

Topics: time, memory, age/experience, life

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
And now is this Vice’s dagger become a squire, and talks as
familiarly of John o’ Gaunt as if he had been sworn brother
to him, and I’ll be sworn he ne’er saw him but once in the
tilt-yard, and then he burst his head for crowding among the
Marshal’s men. I saw it and told John o’ Gaunt he beat his
own name, for you might have thrust him and all his apparel
into an eel-skin; the case of a treble hautboy was a mansion
for him, a court. And now has he land and beefs. Well, I’ll
be acquainted with him, if I return, and ’t shall go hard but
I’ll make him a philosopher’s two stones to me. If the young
dace be a bait for the old pike, I see no reason in the law of
nature but I may snap at him. Let time shape, and there an
end.

DUTCH:
Als de jonge voren een hapjen is voor een ouden
snoek, dan zie ik naar het natuurrecht geen reden, waarom
ik niet naar hem zou mogen happen. Komt tijd, komt
raad, — en daarmee uit.

MORE:

Proverb: The great fish eat up the small

Sworn brother=Comrade in arms
Hautboy=Musical instrument similar to modern oboe
But I’ll=If I don’t
Trussed=Packed (some versions have thrust …into)
Dace=The fish Cyprinus Leuciscus

Compleat:
Sworn-brothers=Eedgenooten, vloekverwanten
To truss=Inpakken
Dace=Een zekere visch, een daas

Topics: proverbs and idioms, achievement, poverty and wealth, time

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Bianca
CONTEXT:
BIANCA
Why, gentlemen, you do me double wrong
To strive for that which resteth in my choice.
I am no breeching scholar in the schools.
I’ll not be tied to hours nor ‘pointed times
But learn my lessons as I please myself.
And, to cut off all strife, here sit we down.
Take you your instrument, play you the whiles.
His lecture will be done ere you have tuned.
HORTENSIO
You’ll leave his lecture when I am in tune?
LUCENTIO
That will be never.
Tune your instrument.

DUTCH:
Ik ben geen schoolkind, dat de roede ducht;
‘k Wil aan geen uur of tijd gebonden zijn,
Maar neem mijn les zooals ik zelf verkies,

MORE:
Double wrong=You are both doing me wrong
Breeching is an old term meaning flogging (e.g. of a schoolboy). “I am no breeching scholar”=I am not “liable to be whipped”.
Tied to=Bound by
Strife=Dispute
Compleat:
To wrong=Verongelyken, verkorten
He did me wrong=Hy deed my ongelyk
To breech=Op de billen slaan
Tied=Gebonden
Strife=Twist, tweedragt, krakkeel, pooging

Topics: punishment, civility, time

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
If it be, sir, I pray you, eat none of it.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Your reason?
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Lest it make you choleric and purchase me another dry basting.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Well, sir, learn to jest in good time. There’s a time for all things.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
I durst have denied that before you were so choleric.

DUTCH:
Het mocht u de gal doen overloopen en mij een tweede klopping bezorgen,

MORE:
Proverb: There is a time for all things (Everything has its time)
Choleric=According to the four humours the four complexions were: sanguine, melancholic, choleric and phlegmatic. Choler was credited with being hot and dry and the choleric man was hot-tempered or irritable
Basting=(1) Keep meat covered with fat or juices to avoid drying out; (2)=Beating with a stick. Dry basting=Severe drubbing

Compleat:
Cholerick=Oploopend, haastig, toornig. To be in choler=Toornig zyn
To jest=Boerten, schertsen, jokken, gekscheeren
Basting=Met een stok slaan, afroffing
Basting of meat=Het bedruipen van ‘t vleesch
CITED IN US LAW:
Griffith v. City of Trenton, 76 N.J.L. 23, 69 A. 29 (1908)

Topics: cited in law, caution, time, proverbs and idioms, misunderstanding, emotion and mood

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Ariel
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
Ariel, thy charge
Exactly is performed. But there’s more work.
What is the time o’ th’ day?
ARIEL
Past the mid season.
PROSPERO
At least two glasses. The time ’twixt six and now
Must by us both be spent most preciously.
ARIEL
Is there more toil? Since thou dost give me pains,
Let me remember thee what thou hast promised,
Which is not yet performed me.

DUTCH:
Meer arbeids nog? Nu gij mij zooveel vergt,
Moge ik u ook op uw belofte wijzen,
Die gij nog niet vervuld hebt.

MORE:
Proverb: ‘Great promise small performance’
Two glasses=Two o’clock (Reference to hour glasses)
Pains=Labours
Preciously=Valuably
Compleat:
Burgersdijk notes:
Twee glazen ruim. Twee uren, naar het uurglas, een zandlooper voor een vol uur, berekend. —Bij de zeevaart is een glas een half uur.

Topics: promise, proverbs and idioms, time, work, contract

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
By this hand, thou thinkest me as far in the
devil’s book as thou and Falstaff for obduracy and
persistency. Let the end try the man. But I tell thee,
my heart bleeds inwardly that my father is so sick;
and keeping such vile company as thou art hath in
reason taken from me all ostentation of sorrow.

DUTCH:
Het eind zal ‘t leeren.

MORE:

Proverb: The end crowns (tries) all

Schmidt:
Obduracy=Hardness of heart, impenitence in wickedness
Ostentation=External show, display (here not boastful)

Compleat:
Ostentation=Beroeming, snorkery, ydele eer, roemzucht, gebral
Obduracy=Hardnekkigheid, verstoktheid

Topics: time, life, age/experience, appearance

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: Ind 2
SPEAKER: Sly
CONTEXT:
MESSENGER
Your Honour’s players, hearing your amendment,
Are come to play a pleasant comedy,
For so your doctors hold it very meet,
Seeing too much sadness hath congealed your blood,
And melancholy is the nurse of frenzy.
Therefore they thought it good you hear a play
And frame your mind to mirth and merriment,
Which bars a thousand harms and lengthens life.
SLY
Marry, I will. Let them play it. Is not a comonty a
Christmas gambol or a tumbling-trick?
PAGE
No, my good lord, it is more pleasing stuff.
SLY
What, household stuff?
PAGE
It is a kind of history.
SLY
Well, we’ll see ’t. Come, madam wife, sit by my side
and let the world slip. We shall ne’er be younger.

DUTCH:
Nu, we willen het zien. Kom, Madame vrouw, zet u
naast mij veer en laat de wereld haar gang gaan; wij
kunnen het nooit jonger doen.

MORE:
Proverb: You shall never be younger

Amendment=Recovery
Hold=Regard
Meet=Appropriate
Frenzy=Madness
Bars=Prevents
Comonty=Comedy
Gambol=Game
History=Story
Slip=Slip by
Compleat:
Amendment=Beterschap; verbeterming
Amendment of life=Verbetering van leeven
Hold=Houden, vatten
Meet=Dienstig, bequaam, gevoeglyk
Frenzy=Ylhoofdigheid, uitzinnigheid
To bar=Dwarsboom, draaiboom, hinderpaal, beletsel, traali
To gambol=Springe, huppelen
History=Een geschiedenis, verhaal, geschiedboek, historie
To slip (or let slip)=Laaten ontslippen

Topics: time, age/experience, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
My high-repented blames,
Dear sovereign, pardon to me.
KING
All is whole;
Not one word more of the consumed time.
Let’s take the instant by the forward top;
For we are old, and on our quick’st decrees
The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time
Steals ere we can effect them. You remember
The daughter of this lord

DUTCH:
t Is alles goed ;
Geen woord meer van ‘t verleed’ne. ‘t Oogenblik
Zij bij de voorhoofdslok door ons gegrepen;
Want wij zijn oud, en wat wij ras ontwerpen,
Besluipt de zachte onhoorb’re voet des tijds,
Eer ‘t is volvoerd .

MORE:
Proverb: Take time (occasion) by the forelock, for she is bald behind
Take the instant by the forward top=Seize the moment
Quickest= Most keenly felt
Compleat:
At this very instant=Op dit eygenste Oogenblik
Quick=Scherp
Cut to the quick=Tot aan ‘t leeven snyden

Topics: time, risk, caution, purpose, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
PRINCE
What wouldst thou think of me if I should weep?
POINS
I would think thee a most princely hypocrite.
PRINCE
It would be every man’s thought, and thou art a blessed fellow to think as every man thinks. Never a man’s thought in the world keeps the roadway better than thine. Every man would think me an hypocrite indeed. And what accites your most worshipful thought to think so?

DUTCH:
Dat zou iedereens gedachte zijn; en gij zijt een gezegend schepsel, dat gij denkt, zooals iedereen denkt; geens stervelings gedachten houden den grooten weg beter dan de uwe.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Accite=To cite, to summon
Keeps the roadway=Is in line with public opinion, predicably common

Topics: time, life

PLAY: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Theseus
CONTEXT:
BOTTOM
No, I assure you. The wall is down
that parted their fathers. Will it please you to see the
epilogue, or to hear a Bergomask dance between two of
our company?
THESEUS
No epilogue, I pray you, for your play needs no excuse.
Never excuse—for when the players are all dead, there
needs none to be blamed. Marry, if he that writ it had
played Pyramus and hanged himself in Thisbe’s garter, it
would have been a fine tragedy. And so it is, truly,
and very notably discharged. But come, your Bergomask.
Let your epilogue alone.
The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve.
Lovers, to bed. ‘Tis almost fairy time.
I fear we shall outsleep the coming morn
As much as we this night have overwatched.
This palpable-gross play hath well beguiled
The heavy gait of night. Sweet friends, to bed. A
fortnight hold we this solemnity,
In nightly revels and new jollity.

DUTCH:
Geen epiloog, verzoek ik u, want uw stuk heeft geen
verontschuldiging noodig

MORE:
Bergomask dance=Dance named after Bergamo, Italy
Told=Struck, tolled
Overwatched=Stayed awake too late
Palpable-gross=Crude
Foredone=Exhausted
Compleat:
Told=Geteld
Palpable=Tastelyk, tastbaar
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbehouwen
Fore-do=Benaadeelen

Burgersdijk notes:
Zelf bedachten dans, Met een dans eindigden de tusschenspelen vaak. In het oorspronkelijke staat Bergomaskerdans, naar Bergamo zoo genoemd. De landlieden uit den omtrek dier stad waren bekend om hunne lompe manieren en speelden bij grof boertige vertooningen nog al eens een rol; in de geschiedenis van den Italiaanschen Arlequino is Bergamo van belang. Een Bergomasker-dans is dus een Hansworstendans.

Topics: justification, honesty, time

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
Nor need’st thou much importune me to that
Whereon this month I have been hammering.
I have considered well his loss of time
And how he cannot be a perfect man,
Not being tried and tutored in the world:
Experience is by industry achieved
And perfected by the swift course of time.
Then tell me, whither were I best to send him?
PANTHINO
I think your lordship is not ignorant
How his companion, youthful Valentine,
Attends the emperor in his royal court.

DUTCH:
Gij hebt geen sterken aandrang noodig, ‘t was
De gansche maand reeds niet uit mijn gedachten;
Ik overwoog reeds lang zijn tijdsverlies,
En hoe hij nooit een deeg’lijk man wordt, als
De wereld hem niet schudt en mondig maakt;

MORE:
Hammering=Pondering
Industry=Assiduity, zealous activity
Importune=Urge, impel
Compleat:
To hammer out a thing=Iets met groote moeite bewerken
Importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen
Industry=Nyverheid, vytigheid, kloekzinnigheid, vernuftigheid
Industry (wit)=Behendigheid
To tutor=Berispen, bestraffen

Topics: time, age/experience, work, value, learning/education

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Exeter
CONTEXT:
He’ll make your Paris Louvre shake for it,
Were it the mistress court of mighty Europe.
And be assured you’ll find a difference,
As we his subjects have in wonder found,
Between the promise of his greener days
And these he masters now. Now he weighs time
Even to the utmost grain. That you shall read
In your own losses, if he stay in France.

DUTCH:
Hij weegt zijn tijd
Thans tot het laatste grein; dit speurt gij dra,
Blijft hij in Frankrijk, in uw nederlagen.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Utmost=Most accurate, computed with absolute exactness; last
Green=Young, inexperienced, raw

Compleat:
Utmost=Uiterste
Green: (not ripe)=Onryp; (raw)=Een nieuweling

Topics: time, age/experience

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
Oh my, time goes by slowly when you’re sad. Was that my father who left here in such a hurry?

DUTCH:
Ach, tijd valt lang door zorgen.

MORE:
The idiom today would say the oppposite: ‘Time flies when you’re enjoying yourself”.

Topics: time, emotion and mood, proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Richard, Duke of Gloucester
CONTEXT:

PRINCE
That Julius Caesar was a famous man.
With what his valour did enrich his wit,
His wit set down to make his valour live.
Death makes no conquest of this conqueror,
For now he lives in fame, though not in life.
I’ll tell you what, my cousin Buckingham—
BUCKINGHAM
What, my gracious lord?
PRINCE
An if I live until I be a man,
I’ll win our ancient right in France again
Or die a soldier, as I lived a king.
RICHARD
Short summers lightly have a forward spring.

DUTCH:
Vroeg wordt na vroege lent de groei geschorst .

MORE:
Proverb: Too soon wise to live long
Proverb: Sharp frosts bite forward springs
Proverb: The good die young
Proverb: Soon ripe soon rotten

Wit=Intellect
Right=Claim (to the French throne)
Compleat:
Wit (understanding)=Vinding, schranderheid, verstand
Birth-right=Geboorte-recht

Topics: time, life, proverbs and idioms, intellect

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Duke of York
CONTEXT:
DUCHESS
Why, my young cousin? It is good to grow.
YORK
Grandam, one night as we did sit at supper,
My uncle Rivers talked how I did grow
More than my brother: “Ay,” quoth my uncle Gloucester,
“Small herbs have grace; great weeds do grow apace.”
And since, methinks I would not grow so fast
Because sweet flowers are slow and weeds make haste.
DUCHESS
Good faith, good faith, the saying did not hold
In him that did object the same to thee!
He was the wretched’st thing when he was young,
So long a-growing and so leisurely,

DUTCH:
„Ja,” zeide oom Gloster toen,
,,Een klein gewas is eel, onkruid groeit veel .”
En sedert wenschte ik minder sterken groei;
Eel kruid komt laat, en onkruid snel in bloei .

MORE:
Proverb: An ill weed grows apace

Grace=Good properties
Since=Since then
Hold=Hold true
Compleat:
Grace=Genade, gunst, bevalligheyd, fraaigheyd, aardige zwier
Weed=Onkruyd
To hold=Houden, vatten; achten

Topics: time, proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised, good and bad, nature

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
First he was
A noble servant to them; but he could not
Carry his honours even: whether ’twas pride,
Which out of daily fortune ever taints
The happy man; whether defect of judgment,
To fail in the disposing of those chances
Which he was lord of; or whether nature,
Not to be other than one thing, not moving
From the casque to the cushion, but commanding peace
Even with the same austerity and garb
As he controll’d the war; but one of these—
As he hath spices of them all, not all,
For I dare so far free him—made him fear’d,
So hated, and so banish’d: but he has a merit,
To choke it in the utterance. So our virtues
Lie in the interpretation of the time:
And power, unto itself most commendable,
Hath not a tomb so evident as a chair
To extol what it hath done.
One fire drives out one fire; one nail, one nail;
Rights by rights falter, strengths by strengths do fail.
Come, let’s away. When, Caius, Rome is thine,
Thou art poor’st of all; then shortly art thou mine.

DUTCH:
In der menschen oordeel
Ligt onze kracht; lofwaarde en echte grootheid
Heeft geen zoo zeker graf als een gestoelte,
Waarop verkond wordt, wat zij heeft verricht.

MORE:
Proverb: Fire drives out fire (1592)
Proverb: One fire (or one nail or one poison) drives out another.

In the interpretation of the time=Evaluation according to prevailing standards [referring to the fluctuation of the popular opinion of Coriolanus, from denunciation to acclaim]
Unto itself most commendable=Having a very high opinion of itself, self-justified
Spices of them all, not all=Not complete, in their full extent
Popular=Of the people, vulgar (a vulgar station=standing place with the crowd)

Schmidt:
Extol=Praise, magnify
Chair=A seat of public authority

Compleat:
Chair of state=Zetel
Extoll=Verheffen, pryzen, looven
To extol one, raise him up to the sky=Iemand tot den Hemel toe verheffen
Highly commendable=Ten hoogste pryselyk

Topics: time, reputation, honesty, integrity, authority, ruin

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Henry Bolingbroke
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Uncle, even in the glasses of thine eyes
I see thy grieved heart: thy sad aspect
Hath from the number of his banish’d years
Pluck’d four away.
Six frozen winter spent,
Return with welcome home from banishment.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
How long a time lies in one little word!
Four lagging winters and four wanton springs
End in a word: such is the breath of kings.

DUTCH:
Wat tijd en macht ligt in een enkel woord!
Vier trage winters en vier dartle Mei’s
Zijn adem, niets, — doet hun een vorst dien eisch.

MORE:

Proverb: The eye is the window of the heart (mind)

Schmidt:
Glasses of thine eyes=Eyeballs
Aspect=Look, glance; possible reference to astrology, with the aspect being the position of one planet in relation to others and its potential to exert influence
Wanton=Bountiful, luxuriant

Compleat:
Aspect=Gezigt, gelaat, aanschouw, stargezigt
Of fierce aspect=Van een straf gelaat

Topics: time, nature, punishment, appearance, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
There is a litter ready. Lay him in ’t
And drive towards Dover, friend, where thou shalt meet
Both welcome and protection. Take up thy master.
If thou shouldst dally half an hour, his life,
With thine and all that offer to defend him,
Stand in assurèd loss. Take up, take up,
And follow me, that will to some provision
Give thee quick conduct.

DUTCH:
Als gij talmt
Al is ‘t maar een half uur, dan is zijn leven
En dat van u en elk, die hem terzij staat,
Verloren, redd’loos./
Als u een half uur talmt, vindt hij met u
en allen die bereid zijn hem te helpen,
zeker de dood.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “offer”: State v Ahlgren, , 158 Minn. 334, 197 N.W. 738 (1924)

Topics: cited in law, remedy, time

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CAPUCIUS
Noble lady,
First mine own service to your grace; the next,
The king’s request that I would visit you;
Who grieves much for your weakness, and by me
Sends you his princely commendations,
And heartily entreats you take good comfort.
KATHERINE
O my good lord, that comfort comes too late;
‘Tis like a pardon after execution:
That gentle physic, given in time, had cured me;
But now I am past an comforts here, but prayers.
How does his highness?

DUTCH:
O beste heer, die troost komt mij te laat;
Ze is als genade na voltrokken vonnis.

MORE:
Commendations=Good wishes, greetings
Physic=Medicine
Comfort=Cures
Compleat:
Commendation=Pryzing, aanpryzing, aanbeveling
Physick=Artseny, medicyn, geneesmiddel
To physick=Geneesmiddelen gebruiken, medicineeren
To comfort=Vertroosten, verquikken

Topics: wellbeing, remedy, time, death

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
PROTEUS
A little time, my lord, will kill that grief.
DUKE
So I believe; but Turio thinks not so.
Proteus, the good conceit I hold of thee—
For thou hast shown some sign of good desert—
Makes me the better to confer with thee.
PROTEUS
Longer than I prove loyal to your grace
Let me not live to look upon your grace.

DUTCH:
Dit wacht ik ook, maar Thurio denkt van neen.
Proteus, ik heb een goeden dunk van u;
En dit, — gij gaaft mij proeven van uw ijver, —
Is oorzaak dat ik verder u vertrouw.

MORE:
Conceit=Impression
Desert=Deserving
Compleat:
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening
Desert (from to deserve)=Verdienste, verdiende loon

Topics: time, remedy, loyallty, reputation

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Dromio of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
ADRIANA
The hours come back. That did I never hear.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
O yes, if any hour meet a sergeant, he turns back for very fear.
ADRIANA
As if time were in debt. How fondly dost thou reason!
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Time is a very bankrout and owes more than he’s worth to season.
Nay, he’s a thief too. Have you not heard men say
That time comes stealing on by night and day?
If he be in debt and theft, and a sergeant in the way,
Hath he not reason to turn back an hour in a day?

DUTCH:
Als of de tijd in schulden stak! hoe dol! wie hoorde ‘t ooit?

MORE:
Hours come back=Go backwards
Bankrout=Bankrupt
Fondly=Foolishly

Compleat:
Fond=Zot, dwaas, ongerymt

Topics: time, reason, debt/obligation

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
My high-repented blames,
Dear sovereign, pardon to me.
KING
All is whole;
Not one word more of the consumed time.
Let’s take the instant by the forward top;
For we are old, and on our quick’st decrees
The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time
Steals ere we can effect them . You remember
The daughter of this lord

DUTCH:
t Is alles goed ;
Geen woord meer van ‘t verleed’ne. ‘t Oogenblik
Zij bij de voorhoofdslok door ons gegrepen;
Want wij zijn oud, en wat wij ras ontwerpen,
Besluipt de zachte onhoorb’re voet des tijds,
Eer ‘t is volvoerd .

MORE:
Proverb: Take time (occasion) by the forelock, for she is bald behind
Take the instant by the forward top=Seize the moment
Quickest= Most keenly felt
Compleat:
At this very instant=Op dit eygenste Oogenblik
Quick=Scherp
Cut to the quick=Tot aan ‘t leeven snyden

Topics: time, age/experience

PLAY: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Titania
CONTEXT:
TITANIA
These are the forgeries of jealousy.
And never, since the middle summer’s spring,
Met we on hill, in dale, forest, or mead,
By pavèd fountain, or by rushy brook,
Or in the beachèd margent of the sea,
To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind,
But with thy brawls thou hast disturbed our sport.
Therefore the winds, piping to us in vain,
As in revenge, have sucked up from the sea
Contagious fogs, which falling in the land
Have every pelting river made so proud
That they have overborne their continents.
The ox hath therefore stretched his yoke in vain,
The ploughman lost his sweat, and the green corn
Hath rotted ere his youth attained a beard.
The fold stands empty in the drownèd field,
And crows are fatted with the murrain flock.
The nine-men’s-morris is filled up with mud,
And the quaint mazes in the wanton green
For lack of tread are undistinguishable.
The human mortals want their winter here.
No night is now with hymn or carol blessed.
Therefore the moon, the governess of floods,
Pale in her anger, washes all the air,
That rheumatic diseases do abound.
And thorough this distemperature we see
The seasons alter: hoary-headed frosts
Fall in the fresh lap of the crimson rose,
And on old Hiems’ thin and icy crown
An odorous chaplet of sweet summer buds
Is, as in mockery, set. The spring, the summer,
The childing autumn, angry winter change
Their wonted liveries, and the mazèd world,
By their increase, now knows not which is which.
And this same progeny of evils comes
From our debate, from our dissension.
We are their parents and original

DUTCH:
(…) lente, zomer,
De gulle herfst, de stuursche winter ruilden
Van kleed; de wereld, gansch verbijsterd, kent
Hen, zelfs aan bloem en vrucht, niet uit elkaar;
En heel deez’ sleep van plagen komt alleen
Van onze oneenigheid, van onzen twist;
Wij hebben dien verwekt, dien voortgebracht.

MORE:
Forgeries=Lies
Rushy=Bordered with rushes
Ringlets=Dances
Brawls=Quarrels
Pelting=Paltry (or pelting)
Continent=Bank
Murrain=Diseased (murrain is a disease affecting sheep and cattle)
Nine-men’s-morris=An outdoor game
Quaint=Intricate
Lack of tread=Where nobody walks
Compleat:
Forgery=Een verdichtsel, verziersel
Brawl=Gekyf
Continent=Het vaste land
Murrain (murren)=Sterfte onder de beesten
Quaint=Cierlyk
To tread=Treeden, betreeden

Topics: suspicion, truth, time, nature

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
O gentlemen, the time of life is short!
To spend that shortness basely were too long,
If life did ride upon a dial’s point,
Still ending at the arrival of an hour
An if we live, we live to tread on kings;
If die, brave death, when princes die with us.
Now, for our consciences, the arms are fair
When the intent of bearing them is just.

DUTCH:
De tijd van leven is kort: die korte tijd laag bij de gronds doorbrengen zou te lang zijn

MORE:
Dial’s point=Hand of a sun-dial
Tread on=Bring about the downfall of
Compleat:
Dial, sun-dial=Zonnewyzer.

Topics: life, nature, time, hope/optimism, conscience, merit, value

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Northumberland, thou ladder wherewithal
The mounting Bolingbroke ascends my throne,
The time shall not be many hours of age
More than it is ere foul sin gathering head
Shalt break into corruption: thou shalt think,
Though he divide the realm and give thee half,
It is too little, helping him to all;
And he shall think that thou, which know’st the way
To plant unrightful kings, wilt know again,
Being ne’er so little urged, another way
To pluck him headlong from the usurped throne.
The love of wicked men converts to fear;
That fear to hate, and hate turns one or both
To worthy danger and deserved death.

DUTCH:
De tijd zal niet veel ouder zijn dan nu,
Eer booze zonde rijpt en zich verzamelt
En openbreekt

MORE:
Wherewithal=With which, by means of which (he is using your ladder)
Gathering head=Coming to a head
Sin=Transgression of the divine law
Helping=Having helped
Unrightful=Illegitimate
So little urged=With only the slightest encouragement
Headlong=Unceremoniously

Compleat:
Now my designs gathering to a head=Nu beginnen myn voornemens ryp te worden
Urged=Gedrongen, geprest, aangedrongen
Headlong=Vlak voorover, plotseling

Topics: loyalty, betrayal, conspiracy, corruption, time

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
JAQUES
A fool, a fool, I met a fool i’ th’ forest,
A motley fool. A miserable world!
As I do live by food, I met a fool,
Who laid him down and basked him in the sun
And railed on Lady Fortune in good terms,
In good set terms, and yet a motley fool.
“Good morrow, fool,” quoth I. “No, sir,” quoth he,
“Call me not ‘fool’ till heaven hath sent me fortune.”
And then he drew a dial from his poke
And, looking on it with lackluster eye,
Says very wisely, “It is ten o’clock.
Thus we may see,” quoth he, “how the world wags.
‘Tis but an hour ago since it was nine,
And after one hour more ’twill be eleven.
And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe,
And then from hour to hour we rot and rot,
And thereby hangs a tale.” When I did hear
The motley fool thus moral on the time,
My lungs began to crow like chanticleer
That fools should be so deep-contemplative,
And I did laugh sans intermission
An hour by his dial. O noble fool!
A worthy fool! Motley’s the only wear.

DUTCH:
En dit geeft dan een sprookjen

MORE:
Proverb: Thereby hangs (lies) a tale
Proverb: Fortune favours fools

Motley=Multicoloured jester outfit
Set=Composed
Rail=To use reproachful language, to scold in opprobrious terms
Poke=Pouch or pocket
Lacklustre=Lacking radiance, gloss or brightness (Latin lustrare).
Dial=(Fob)watch
Poke=Pouch, pocket
Moral=Moralise
Deep=Profoundly
Chanticleer=Rooster
Compleat:
Motley=Een grove gemengelde
To rail=Schelden
To wag (to move or stir)=Schudden, beweegen
Poke=Zak
Lustre=Luyster
Dial=Wysplaat
To moralize=Een zedelyke uitlegging of toepassing op iets maaken
Deep=Diepzinnig

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, blame, nature, time

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
Now sir, the sound that tells what hour it is
Are clamorous groans, which strike upon my heart,
Which is the bell: so sighs and tears and groans
Show minutes, times, and hours: but my time
Runs posting on in Bolingbroke’s proud joy,
While I stand fooling here, his Jack o’ the clock.
This music mads me; let it sound no more;
For though it have holp madmen to their wits,
In me it seems it will make wise men mad.
Yet blessing on his heart that gives it me!
For ’tis a sign of love; and love to Richard
Is a strange brooch in this all-hating world.

DUTCH:
Dol maakt mij die muziek, dat zij verstomme!
Want bracht zij dollen soms tot hun verstand,
In mij, zoo schijnt het, maakt zij wijsheid dol

MORE:

Clamorous=Vociferous, loud
Posting=Fast
Jack o’ the clock=Figure who would strike the bell on the clock
Holp=Short for holpen, helped. Have holp=May have helped
Wits=Senses
Brooch=Ornament

Compleat:
Holpen=Geholpen
Holp op=Opgeholpen
Wits=Zinnen, oordeel

Topics: time, regret, madness, wisdom

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
Thou art so fat-witted with drinking of old sack and unbuttoning thee after supper and sleeping upon benches in the afternoon, that thou hast forgotten to demand that truly which thou wouldst truly know. What a devil hast thou to do with the time of the day?

DUTCH:

Gij zijt zoo vet van brein geworden van het oude-sekdrinken, het kamizool-losknoopen na het avondeten, en het slapen op banken na den middag, dat gij verleerd hebt, werkelijk te vragen naar wat gij werkelijk weten wilt. Wat duivel hebt gij met den tijd van den dag te maken?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Fat-witted=Heavy-witted, stupid

Topics: insult, excess, intellect, time

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
JOHN OF GAUNT
But not a minute, king, that thou canst give:
Shorten my days thou canst with sullen sorrow,
And pluck nights from me, but not lend a morrow;
Thou canst help time to furrow me with age,
But stop no wrinkle in his pilgrimage;
Thy word is current with him for my death,
But dead, thy kingdom cannot buy my breath.
KING RICHARD II
Thy son is banish’d upon good advice,
Whereto thy tongue a party-verdict gave:
Why at our justice seem’st thou then to lour?

DUTCH:
Niet één minuut, o vorst, die gij kunt geven;
Mijn dagen kunt gij korten, ja, door zorgen,
Mij nachten rooven, — leenen — niet éen morgen,
Den tijd wel helpen rimpels mij te groeven,
Zijn doen te stremmen, zult gij niet beproeven;

MORE:

Schmidt:
Current= generally received, of full value, sterling, having currency (Come current as=have currency, be accepted as)
Party-verdict=Joint verdict given by more than one judge
Upon good advice=After careful deliberation, consideration
Lour=Frown, look sullen

Compleat:
Current=Gangbaar
To take a thing for current payment=Iets voor gangbaare munt aanneemen
To lowre=Stuursch kyken, donker uitzien
Lowring countenance=Een stuursch of donker gezigt
Advice=Raad, vermaaning, goedvinden

Topics: time, age/experience, concern , appearance, punishment

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
How poor are they that have not patience!
What wound did ever heal but by degrees?
Thou know’st we work by wit and not by witchcraft,
And wit depends on dilatory time.
Does’t not go well? Cassio hath beaten thee.
And thou, by that small hurt, hath cashiered Cassio.
Though other things grow fair against the sun,
Yet fruits that blossom first will first be ripe.
Content thyself awhile. In troth, ’tis morning.
Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.
Retire thee, go where thou art billeted.
Away, I say, thou shalt know more hereafter.
Nay, get thee gone.
Two things are to be done:
My wife must move for Cassio to her mistress.
I’ll set her on.
Myself, the while, to draw the Moor apart
And bring him jump when he may Cassio find
Soliciting his wife. Ay, that’s the way.
Dull not device by coldness and delay.

DUTCH:
Hoe veel ook goed gedije in ‘t licht der zon,
Die vrucht, die ‘t eerst gebloeid heeft, rijpt het eerst;

MORE:
Proverb: He that has no patience has nothing

Cashiered=Dismissed
Depends on dilatory time=Time moves slowly
Other things grow fair=Long-term plans blossom slowly
Fruits that blossom first=Preliminary plans (have already borne fruit)
Move for=Plead for
Jump=At that precise time
Device=Plot
When=At the point when
Device=Plan
To dull=To incapacitate, make inert
Coldness=Lack of enthusiasm or energy
Compleat:
To move (to stir up, to egg on, to solicit or persuade)=Aanstooken, oprokkenen
To move to compassion=Tot medelyden beweegen
Dilatory=Uitstel-zoekende
Dull=Bot, stomp, dof, dom, loom, vadsig, doodsch
It dulls my brains=Het maakt myn verstand stomp

Topics: time, plans/intentions, conspiracy, patience, purpose, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Cordelia
CONTEXT:
Time shall unfold what plighted cunning hides,
Who covers faults at last with shame derides.
Well may you prosper.

DUTCH:
De tijd brengt alles aan het licht./
Wie fouten maken en dat sluw maskeren,
zal tijd ons later met een spotlach leren.

MORE:
Onions:
To plight=Pleated, folded (concealed)
Cunning=Dissimulation, falseness

Topics: deceit, discovery, time, secrecy

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ORLANDO
And why not the swift foot of time? Had not that been
as proper?
ROSALIND
By no means, sir. Time travels in diverse paces with
diverse persons. I’ll tell you who time ambles withal,
who time trots withal, who time gallops withal, and who
he stands still withal.
ORLANDO
I prithee, who doth he trot withal?
ROSALIND
Marry, he trots hard with a young maid between the
contract of her marriage and the day it is solemnized.
If the interim be but a se’nnight, time’s pace is so hard
that it seems the length of seven year.
ORLANDO
Who ambles time withal?
ROSALIND
With a priest that lacks Latin and a rich man that hath n
ot the gout, for the one sleeps easily because he
cannot study and the other lives merrily because he
feels no pain—the one lacking the burden of lean and
wasteful learning, the other knowing no burden of heavy
tedious penury. These time ambles withal.
ORLANDO
Who doth he gallop withal?
ROSALIND
With a thief to the gallows, for though he go as softly
as foot can fall, he thinks himself too soon there.
ORLANDO
Who stays it still withal?
ROSALIND
With lawyers in the vacation, for they sleep between
term and term, and then they perceive not how time moves.

DUTCH:
Volstrekt niet, heer; de Tijd reist met verschillende
personen in verschillenden gang. Ik kan u zeggen, met
wie de Tijd den tel gaat, met wie de Tijd draaft, met
wie de Tijd galoppeert en met wie hij stil staat.

MORE:
Withal=With
Proper=Appropriate
Paces=Speeds
Se’ennight=Week
Hard=Slow
Wasteful=Exhausting
Penury=Poverty and indigence
Term=The time in which a court is held for the trial of causes. The legal year was divided into terms with recesses in between
Compleat:
Withall=Daar beneeven, mede, met eene
Proper=Bequaam, van een bequaame lengte
Pace=Een stap, treede, schreede, tred, gang, pas, voortgang
Wasted=Verwoest, vervallen, uitgeteerd
Penury=Behoeftigheid, armoede, gebrek
The four terms of the year=De vier gezette Rechtsdagen in ‘t jaar

Topics: time, lawyers, life, order/society

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Hastings
CONTEXT:
We are time’s subjects, and time bids be gone.

DUTCH:
De tijd beheerscht ons, en de tijd eischt spoed

MORE:

Topics: time

PLAY: The Merry Wives of Windsor
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Mistress Ford
CONTEXT:
MISTRESS FORD
We burn daylight: here, read, read; perceive how I
might be knighted. I shall think the worse of fat
men, as long as I have an eye to make difference of
men’s liking: and yet he would not swear; praised
women’s modesty; and gave such orderly and
well-behaved reproof to all uncomeliness, that I
would have sworn his disposition would have gone to
the truth of his words; but they do no more adhere
and keep place together than the Hundredth Psalm to
the tune of ‘Green Sleeves.’ What tempest, I trow,
threw this whale, with so many tuns of oil in his
belly, ashore at Windsor? How shall I be revenged
on him? I think the best way were to entertain him
with hope, till the wicked fire of lust have melted
him in his own grease. Did you ever hear the like?

DUTCH:
Wij branden licht bij dag; — lees hier, lees; — zie
eens, hoe ik geridderd kan worden.

MORE:
Proverb: You burn daylight
Proverb: He stews (fries) in his own grease

Burn daylight=Wasting time
Make difference of=Differentiate between
Liking=Appearance
Uncomeliness=Inappropriate conduct
Gone to=Corresponded with
Trow=Wonder
Tun=Barrel, cask
Compleat:
To burn day-light=By dage een kaers branden
Comeliness=Bevalligheyd
Trow=Denk, acht
Tun=Ton

Topics: time, urgency, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
BRABANTIO
Look to her, Moor, if thou hast eyes to see.
She has deceived her father, and may thee.
OTHELLO
My life upon her faith!—Honest Iago,
My Desdemona must I leave to thee.
I prithee, let thy wife attend on her,
And bring them after in the best advantage.
Come, Desdemona, I have but an hour
Of love, of worldly matter and direction,
To spend with thee. We must obey the time.

DUTCH:
Kom, Desdemona; slechts een enkel uur
Is mij voor liefde en reeg’ling van ons huis
Met u vergund; de tijd beheerscht ons doen.

MORE:
In the best advantage=Most favourable opportunity
Obey the time=Time is pressing
Compleat:
To give one the advantage=Iemand de voortogt geven
Advantage=Voordeel, voorrecht, winst, gewin, toegift

Topics: time, plans/intentions, life, deceit, truth, opportunity

PLAY: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Theseus
CONTEXT:
THESEUS
Come now, what masques, what dances shall we have
To wear away this long age of three hours
Between our after-supper and bedtime?
Where is our usual manager of mirth?
What revels are in hand? Is there no play,
To ease the anguish of a torturing hour?
Call Philostrate.
PHILOSTRATE
Here, mighty Theseus.
THESEUS
Say, what abridgement have you for this evening?
What masque, what music? How shall we beguile
The lazy time if not with some delight?
PHILOSTRATE
There is a brief, how many sports are ripe.
Make choice of which your highness will see first.

DUTCH:
Wat tijdverdrijf biedt ge ons van avond aan?
Muziek? of maskerfeest? Hoe foppen wij
Den tragen tijd, zoo niet door vroolijkheid?

MORE:
After-supper=Dessert
Abridgement=Enterainment to pass the time
Manager of mirth=Master of the Revels, who organised entertainment
Beguile=Pass the time
Compleat:
Abridgement=Een verkortsel
Mirth=Vrolykheyd, geneugte
Beguile=Bedriegen, om den tuyn leyden

Topics: time

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
BUCKINGHAM
You are too senseless-obstinate, my lord,
Too ceremonious and traditional.
Weigh it but with the grossness of this age,
You break not sanctuary in seizing him.
The benefit thereof is always granted
To those whose dealings have deserved the place
And those who have the wit to claim the place.
This prince hath neither claimed it nor deserved it
And therefore, in mine opinion, cannot have it.
Then taking him from thence that is not there,
You break no privilege nor charter there.
Oft have I heard of sanctuary men,
But sanctuary children, ne’er till now.

DUTCH:
Gij klemt, Mylord, u to kleingeestig vast
Aan vormen, aan wat de oudheid heilig noemde ;
Maar toets het met de strengheid onzes tijds,
En ‘t is geen heiligschennis hem to grijpen

MORE:
Senseless-obstinate=Unreasonably stubborn
Ceremonious=Standing on ceremony
Weigh it but with=Consider only in the context of
Grossness=Crudeness
Charter=Grant of rights
Compleat:
Senseless=Gevoeleloos, ongevoelig, zinneloos
Obstinate=Hardnekkig, halstarrig, styfkoppig, wrevelmoedig
Weigh=Weegen, overweegen
To weigh all things by pleasures and sorrows=Van alles oordeelen door het vermaak of de droefheid
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbebouwen
Charter=Handvest, voorrecht

Burgersdijk notes:
De weldaad van een vrijplaats wordt verleend enz. De hier door Buckingham aangevoerde gronden werden in den raad inderdaad door hem aangevoerd, toen de Protector beide prinsen onder zijne hoede wilde nemen. De koningin, die aan de vertoogen van den kardinaal niet wilde toegeven, deed het eindelijk, toen de kardinaal vertrok en de overige edelen bleven ; zij vreesde toen, dat er geweld zou gepleegd worden. De ontmoeting der broeders had in het bisschoppelijk paleis van St. Paul plaats; daarna werden zij in alle static naar den Tower gebracht en er gehuisvest, om dezen niet weder te verlaten.

Topics: fashion/trends, judgment, understanding, time

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:
ORLANDO
You should ask me what time o’ day. There’s no clock
in the forest.
ROSALIND
Then there is no true lover in the forest, else sighing
every minute and groaning every hour would detect the
lazy foot of time as well as a clock.
ORLANDO
And why not the swift foot of time? Had not that been as proper?
ROSALIND
By no means, sir. Time travels in diverse paces with diverse persons. I’ll tell you who time ambles withal, who time trots withal, who time gallops withal, and who he stands still withal.
ORLANDO
I prithee, who doth he trot withal?

DUTCH:
Gij moest liever vragen, welken tijd van den dag het
is, want in het woud is er geen klok.

MORE:
Detect=Reveal, mark
Withal=With
Proper=Appropriate
Paces=Speeds
Compleat:
Detect=Ontdekken, openleggen
Withall=Daar beneeven, mede, met eene
Proper=Bequaam, van een bequaame lengte
Pace=Een stap, treede, schreede, tred, gang, pas, voortgang

Topics: time, order/society, life

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