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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Diana
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
How have I sworn!
DIANA
‘Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vow’d true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the High’st to witness: then, pray you, tell me,
If I should swear by God’s great attributes,
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths,
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love,
That I will work against him: therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unseal’d,
At least in my opinion.

DUTCH:
Een tal van eeden maakt de trouw niet hecht;
Een eed, eenvoudig, waar en trouw, volstaat;
Men zweert slechts bij wat heilig is, vooral
Bij de’ Allerhoogste;


MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
The many=The number of
Single=One; sincere
Ill=Poorly; not at all
Unsealed=Without a (validating) seal
Compleat:
Ill=Quaad, ondeugend, onpasselijk
Sealed=Gezegeld, verzegeld
To set a seal to a thing=Een zegel aan iets steeken/hangen

Topics: truth, honesty, love, promise

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
You have heard him swear downright he was.
CELIA
“Was” is not “is.” Besides, the oath of a lover is no stronger than the word of a tapster. They are both the confirmer of false reckonings. He attends here in the forest on the duke your father.

DUTCH:
Was is geen is; bovendien, de eed van een minnaar is niet meer waard dan de eed van een tapper; zij zijn beide de bekrachtiging van valsche rekeningen

MORE:
Schmidt:
Downright=Directly, without stopping short, without further ceremony, plainly
False=Not right, wrong, erroneous
Compleat:
Downright (plain and clear)=Eenvoudig and clear
Downright (plain or open)=Duidelyk of openhartig
A downright contradiction=Een rechtstrydede zaak

Topics: language, clarity/precision, truth, honesty

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
Upon a lie seven times removed.—Bear your body more seeming, Audrey.—As thus, sir: I did dislike the cut of a certain courtier’s beard. He sent me word if I said his beard was not cut well, he was in the mind it was. This is called “the retort courteous.” If I sent him word again it was not well cut, he would send me word he cut it to please himself. This is called “the quip modest.” If again it was not well cut, he disabled my judgment. This is called “the reply churlish.” If again it was not well cut, he would answer I spake not true. This is called “the reproof valiant.” If again it was not well cut, he would say I lie. This is called “the countercheck quarrelsome,” and so to “the lie circumstantial” and “the lie direct.”

DUTCH:
Die allen kunt gij ontduiken,
behalve de rechtstreeksche logenstraffing; en
ook die kunt gij ontduiken, met een „indien”.

MORE:
CITED IN UK LAW: McNally v Snap Heath Ltd [1998] UKEAT 1013_97_2306 (23 June 1998)
‘and had been met, to quote Shakespeare, by the “countercheck quarrelsome”‘.

Topics: law/legal, cited in law, truth, deceit

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Bertram
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
What of him?
He’s quoted for a most perfidious slave,
With all the spots o’ the world tax’d and debosh’d;
Whose nature sickens but to speak a truth.
Am I or that or this for what he’ll utter,
That will speak any thing?
KING
She hath that ring of yours.
BERTRAM
I think she has: certain it is I liked her,
And boarded her i’ the wanton way of youth:
She knew her distance and did angle for me,
Madding my eagerness with her restraint,
As all impediments in fancy’s course
Are motives of more fancy; and, in fine,
Her infinite cunning, with her modern grace,
Subdued me to her rate: she got the ring;
And I had that which any inferior might
At market-price have bought.

DUTCH:
O, waartoe dit?
Hij staat bekend als trouwelooze schelm,
Bevlekt met ied’re smet en blaam der wereld,
Die ziek wordt , als hij waarheid spreken moet .
En ben ik dit of dat, als hij het zegt,
Die alles zeggen kan?

MORE:
Quoted for=Reputed, known to be
Spots=Vices, stains, blemishes
Taxed=Censured
Deboshed=Debauched
Or that or this=Either this or that
For what he’ll utter=Based on what he says
Subdued me to=Forced me to pay
Rate=Price
In fine=In the end
Compleat:
To tax=Beschuldigen
To debauch=Verleyden, vervoeren, oprokkenen

Topics: truth, honesty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
He did love her, sir, as a gentleman loves a woman.
KING
How is that?
PAROLLES
He loved her, sir, and loved her not.
KING
As thou art a knave, and no knave. What an equivocal companion is this!
PAROLLES
I am a poor man, and at your majesty’s command.
LAFEW
He’s a good drum, my lord, but a naughty orator.

DUTCH:
Zooals gij een schelm en geen schelm zijt. Wat is dat een dubbeltongige kerel!

MORE:
Naughty (nichtig)=Worthless
Equivocal=Ambiguous
Compleat:
Knave=Een guit, boef
Equivocal=Dubbelzinnig

Topics: truth, honesty

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Joan la Pucelle
CONTEXT:
JOAN LA PUCELLE
(…)Ask me what question thou canst possible,
And I will answer unpremeditated:
My courage try by combat, if thou darest,
And thou shalt find that I exceed my sex.
Resolve on this, thou shalt be fortunate,
If thou receive me for thy warlike mate.
CHARLES
Thou hast astonish’d me with thy high terms:
Only this proof I’ll of thy valour make,
In single combat thou shalt buckle with me,
And if thou vanquishest, thy words are true;
Otherwise I renounce all confidence.

DUTCH:
Vraag mij naar alles wat gij vragen kunt,
Onvoorbereid zal ik u antwoord geven;
Toets in den strijd, indien gij durft, mijn moed,
Bevinden zult gij, meer ben ik dan vrouw.
Neem uw besluit; — gij hebt geluk op aard,
Wanneer gij mij als strijdgenoot aanvaardt.

MORE:
Resolve=Be assured, know this
High terms=Pompous words
Proof=Trial
Buckle=Grapple
Confidence=Trust

Compleat:
To resolve upon something=Iets bepaalen
I know not what to resolve on=Ik weet niet wat ik besluiten zal
Proof=Beproeving
To buckle together=Worstelen, schermutselen
To repose an entire confidence in one=Een volkomen betrouwen op iemand stellen

Topics: trust, language, dispute, truth

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Cade
CONTEXT:
I feel remorse in myself with his words; but I’ll bridle it:
he shall die, an it be but for pleading so well for his life.
Away with him! He has a familiar under his tongue;
he speaks not o’ God’s name. Go, take him away,
I say, and strike off his head presently;
and then break into his son-in-law’s house,
Sir James Cromer, and strike off his head,
and bring them both upon two poles hither.

DUTCH:
Weg met hem! hij heeft een dienstbaren duivel onder zijn tong, hij spreekt niet in den naam van God

MORE:

Bridle=Rein in, constrain
Familiar=Demon or spirit
An be it but for=If only for

Compleat:
To bridle=Intoomen, breidelen, beteugelen
Familiar=Een gemeenzaame geet, queldrommel

Topics: language, deceit, truth, punishment, regret

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
SUFFOLK
Hath he not twit our sovereign lady here
With ignominious words, though clerkly couch’d,
As if she had suborned some to swear
False allegations to o’erthrow his state?
QUEEN MARGARET
But I can give the loser leave to chide.
GLOUCESTER
Far truer spoke than meant: I lose, indeed;
Beshrew the winners, for they play’d me false!
And well such losers may have leave to speak.
BUCKINGHAM
He’ll wrest the sense and hold us here all day:
Lord cardinal, he is your prisoner.

DUTCH:
Hem, die verliest, vergun ik ‘t wel, te schimpen.

MORE:

Proverb: Give losers leave to speak (talk)

Twit=To reproach
Clerkly couched=Cleverly expressed, articulated
Suborn=Institgate to perjury
Wrest=Distort, spin, misinterpret
Beshrew=(or beshrow): mild curse

Compleat:
To suborn a witness=Eenen getuige opmaaken of omkoopen
To twit in the teeth=Verwyten
He ever twits me in the teeth with it=Hy werpt het my gestadig voor de scheenen
Twitting=Verwyting, verwytende
To suborn a witness=Eenen getuige opmaaken of omkoopen
To wrest=Verdraaijen, wringen
To wrest one’s words maliciously=Iemands woorden kwaadaardig verdraaijen
Beshrew=Bekyven, vervloeken

Topics: truth, manipulation, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Chamberlain
CONTEXT:
SUFFOLK
The Cardinal’s letters to the Pope miscarried
And came to th’ eye o’ th’ King, wherein was read
How that the Cardinal did entreat his Holiness
To stay the judgment o’ th’ divorce; for if
It did take place, “I do,” quoth he, “perceive
My king is tangled in affection to
A creature of the Queen’s, Lady Anne Bullen.”
SURREY
Has the King this?
SUFFOLK
Believe it.
SURREY
Will this work?
CHAMBERLAIN
The King in this perceives him how he coasts
And hedges his own way. But in this point
All his tricks founder, and he brings his physic
After his patient’s death: the King already
Hath married the fair lady.

DUTCH:
Nu merkt de koning, hoe de paap zijn wegen
Omsluipt, doorsnuffelt; doch thans helpen hem
Zijn treken niets; thans komt hij met zijn drankjen
Na ‘s lijders dood.

MORE:
Proverb: After death the doctor
Miscarried=Wrongly delivered
Creature=Servant
To coast=Wander, change course (in allegance)
To hedge=Shift
Compleat:
Miscarry=Mislukken, quaalyk uytvallen
The letter was miscarry’d=De brief was niet wel besteld
To coast along=Langs de strand (of kust) vaaren
To hedge=Beheynen, omheynen

Topics: conspiracy, discovery, truth, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Second Gentleman
CONTEXT:
SECOND GENTLEMAN
I am confident,
You shall, sir: did you not of late days hear
A buzzing of a separation
Between the king and Katharine?
FIRST GENTLEMAN
Yes, but it held not:
For when the king once heard it, out of anger
He sent command to the lord mayor straight
To stop the rumour, and allay those tongues
That durst disperse it.
SECOND GENTLEMAN
But that slander, sir,
Is found a truth now: for it grows again
Fresher than e’er it was; and held for certain
The king will venture at it. Either the cardinal,
Or some about him near, have, out of malice
To the good queen, possess’d him with a scruple
That will undo her: to confirm this too,
Cardinal Campeius is arrived, and lately;
As all think, for this business.

DUTCH:
Maar die lastertaal
Blijkt waarheid nu; zij groeit op nieuw, en frisscher
Dan ooit, weer aan.

MORE:
Proverb: It may be a slander but it is no lie
Buzzing=Rumours
Durst=Ventured to, dared to
Fresher=Stronger (than ever)
Possessed with a scruple=Sowed suspicion
Compleat:
Durst=Durfde
Scruple=Zwaarigheyd, schroom

Topics: proverbs and idioms, conscience, truth

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Polonius
CONTEXT:
By indirections find directions out.
So by my former lecture and advice
Shall you my son. You have me, have you not?

DUTCH:
Op averechtsche wijs den rechten weg /
Zo gaan wij, de slimmen en bekwamen, langs kronkelpaden recht op ons doel af.

MORE:
The effectiveness of indirect questioning (see “your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth”).
Schmidt:
Indirection=oblique course or means
Compleat:
The directing of one’s intentions=Het bestieren van iemands voorneemen

Topics: truth, discovery, intellect, skill/talent

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Bertram
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
Damnable both-sides rogue !
FIRST SOLDIER
[Reads] ‘When he swears oaths, bid him drop gold, and take it;
After he scores, he never pays the score:
Half won is match well made; match, and well make it;
He ne’er pays after-debts, take it before;
And say a soldier, Dian, told thee this,
Men are to mell with, boys are not to kiss:
For count of this, the count’s a fool, I know it,
Who pays before, but not when he does owe it.
Thine, as he vowed to thee in thine ear, Parolles.’
BERTRAM
He shall be whipped through the army with this rhyme
in’s forehead.
SECOND LORD
This is your devoted friend, sir, the manifold linguist and the armipotent soldier.

DUTCH:
Die vervloekte, dubbeltongige schurk!

MORE:
Both-sides=Double-tongued, two-faced
Score=(1) Hit the mark (2) Bill
Half-won=Well negotiated is half the game
After-debts=Money payable upon receipt
Mell=Meddle, mess around with (sexually)
Pays before=Pays in advance
Armipotent=Mighty in arms
Manifold=Multiple
Compleat:
Jack on both sides=Slinks en rechts
To score=Op rekening zetten
Score=Rekening, kerfstok
Manifold=Veelvoudig, veelvuldig

Topics: insult, offence, integrity, truth

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Second officer
CONTEXT:
FIRST OFFICER
That’s a brave fellow, but he’s vengeance proud and loves not the common people.
SECOND OFFICER
Faith, there had been many great men that have
flattered the people, who ne’er loved them; and there
be many that they have loved, they know not
wherefore: so that, if they love they know not why,
they hate upon no better a ground: therefore, for
Coriolanus neither to care whether they love or hate
him manifests the true knowledge he has in their
disposition; and out of his noble carelessness lets
them plainly see’t.

DUTCH:
Nu, er zijn vele groote mannen geweest, . die het volk gevleid hebben en het toch nooit mochten lijden; en er zijn er velen, waar het volk van hield, zonder dat het wist waarom.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Manifest=Make obvious, evident, not doubtful
Disposition=Natural constitution of the mind, temper, character, sentiments
Carelessness=Lack of concern, indifference

Compleat:
To manifest=Openbaaren, openbaar maaken
Carelessness=Zorgeloosheid, kommerloosheid, onachtzaamheid, achteloosheid

Topics: truth, flattery, deception, love, respect

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
FIRST SOLDIER
You are undone, captain, all but your scarf; that has a knot on’t yet
PAROLLES
Who cannot be crushed with a plot?
FIRST SOLDIER
If you could find out a country where but women were
that had received so much shame, you might begin an
impudent nation. Fare ye well, sir; I am for France too: we shall speak of you there.
PAROLLES
Yet am I thankful if my heart were great
‘Twould burst at this. Captain I’ll be no more;
But I will eat and drink, and sleep as soft
As captain shall: simply the thing I am
Shall make me live. Who knows himself a braggart,
Let him fear this; for it will come to pass
That every braggart shall be found an ass.
Rust, sword! cool, blushes! and, Parolles, live
Safest in shame! being fool’d, by foolery thrive!
There ‘s place and means for every man alive.
I’ll after them.

DUTCH:
Wie zich pocher weet,
Hij lette op mij; dan ziet hij, dat in ‘t end
Elk pocher steeds als ezel wordt herkend.

MORE:
Impudent=Shameless
Braggart=Boaster
Found an ass=Shown to be an ass
Shame=Dishonour, disgrace
Compleat:
Impudent=Onbeschaamd, schaamteloos
Braggart, braggard or Braggadochio=Een pocher, Blaaskaak
Shame (reproach, ignominy)=Schande

Topics: truth, honesty, discovery

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Isabella
CONTEXT:
It is not truer he is Angelo
Than this is all as true as it is strange:
Nay, it is ten times true; for truth is truth
To the end of reckoning.

DUTCH:
Niet warer is het, dat hij Angelo,
Dan dat dit alles even waar als vreemd is;
Ja, het is tienmaal waar, want waar is waar,
Als eind van alle reek’ning.

MORE:
Still in use.

Topics: truth, invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
Away ! th’ art a knave.
CLOWN
You should have said, sir, before a knave th’ art a knave; that ‘s, before me th ‘rt a knave: this had been truth, sir.
PAROLLES
Go to, thou art a witty fool; I have found thee.
CLOWN
Did you find me in yourself, sir, or were you
taught to find me ?

DUTCH:
Loop, loop, gij zijt een schelmsche nar; ik heb u in
mijn zak

MORE:
In yourself=By your own efforts
Knave= Rascal, villain
Found thee=Seen through you
Compleat:
Witty=Verstandig, vernuftig, schrander
Knave=Guyt, boef

Topics: truth, identity, independence

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Stephano
CONTEXT:
STEPHANO
Come on your ways. Open your mouth. Here is that which will give language to you, cat. Open your mouth. This will shake your shaking, I can tell you, and that soundly. You cannot tell who’s your friend. Open your chaps again.
TRINCULO
I should know that voice. It should be—But he is drowned, and these are devils. Oh, defend me!
STEPHANO
Four legs and two voices—a most delicate monster. His forward voice now is to speak well of his friend. His backward voice is to utter foul speeches and to detract. If all the wine in my bottle will recover him, I will help his ague. Come.
(CALIBAN drinks)
Amen! I will pour some in thy other mouth.

DUTCH:
Vier beenen en twee stemmen! een allerkostelijkst
monster. Zijn voorstem dient zeker om goed te spreken
van zijn vriend, zijn achterstem voor achterklap en laster.

MORE:
Cat=Reference to the proverb ‘Good liquor (ale) will make a cat speak’.
Chaps=Jaws, chops
Delicate=Pleasant, delightful
Compleat:
To turn cat in pan=Overloopen, van party veranderen
The chaps=’t Bakkus
Delicate=Teer, zacht, lekker

Topics: proverbs and idioms, excess, truth

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
How art thou out of breath when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
The excuse that thou dost make in this delay
Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse.
Is thy news good, or bad? Answer to that.
Say either, and I’ll stay the circumstance.
Let me be satisfied. Is ’t good or bad?

DUTCH:
Gij buiten adem? en gij hebt toch adem,
Dat gij me uw buiten-adem-zijn vertelt?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Stay=Wait for
Circumstance=Particulars, detail
Compleat:
Stay (to tarry or sejourn)=Verblyven
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
A fact set out in all its circumstances=Een geval in alle zyne omsandigheden verhaalen.

Topics: time, good and bad, reason, reply, truth

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
How high a pitch his resolution soars!
Thomas of Norfolk, what say’st thou to this?
THOMAS MOWBRAY
O, let my sovereign turn away his face
And bid his ears a little while be deaf,
Till I have told this slander of his blood,
How God and good men hate so foul a liar.
KING RICHARD II
Mowbray, impartial are our eyes and ears:
Were he my brother, nay, my kingdom’s heir,
As he is but my father’s brother’s son,
Now, by my sceptre’s awe, I make a vow,
Such neighbour nearness to our sacred blood
Should nothing privilege him, nor partialize
The unstooping firmness of my upright soul:
He is our subject, Mowbray; so art thou:
Free speech and fearless I to thee allow.

DUTCH:
Wat vlucht ten wolken neemt zijn koene geest!
Thomas van Norfolk, wat zegt gij hierop?

MORE:

Pitch=Highest point of soaring flight for a hawk or falcon
Neighbour nearness=Extremely close proximity
Partialize=Prejudice
Unstooping=Unbending (Stoop is another falcony ref. meaning to come down or pounce on the prey)
Fearless=Bold
Blood=Ancestry

Compleat:
To stoop=Buigen, bokken of bukken
A hawk that makes a stoop at a partridge=Een valk die op een Patrys valt
Fearless=Schroomeloos, onbevreesd, onvertzaagd, onbeschroomd, onverschrokken

Topics: resolution, strength, truth, relationship, honour

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Chief Justice
CONTEXT:
Sir John, Sir John, I am well acquainted with your manner
of wrenching the true cause the false way. It is not a
confident brow, nor the throng of words that come with such more than impudent sauciness from you, can thrust me from a level consideration. You have, as it appears to me, practiced upon the easy-yielding spirit of this woman, and made her serve your uses both in purse and in person.

DUTCH:
Sir John, Sir John, ik ken zeer wel uw manier van doen, van de ware toedracht van een zaak te verdraaien.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Wrench=To pull by violence, to wrest
Sauciness=Impertinent boldness, impudence
Brow=Aspect, appearance
Throng=A crowd pressing forward to some purpose
Thrust (fig.)=Drive, force
Level=Equipoised, steady

Compleat:
To wrench=Verdraaijen, verwringen
Sauciness=Baldaadigheid, brooddronkenheid
Throng=Gedrang, een menigte volks
Brow=Vrypostigheid

Topics: truth, deceit, honestymanipulation

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Edgar
CONTEXT:
I cannot daub it further

DUTCH:
Ik kan niet langer veinzen.

MORE:
Daub it further=Keep dissembling. (Old French ‘dauber’, whitewash).
See also Richard III: “So smooth he daub’d his vice with show of virtue.” (Richard, 3.5)

Topics: truth, honesty

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
I do profess
You speak not like yourself; who ever yet
Have stood to charity, and display’d the effects
Of disposition gentle, and of wisdom
O’ertopping woman’s power. Madam, you do me wrong:
I have no spleen against you; nor injustice
For you or any: how far I have proceeded,
Or how far further shall, is warranted
By a commission from the consistory,
Yea, the whole consistory of Rome. You charge me
That I have blown this coal: I do deny it:
The king is present: if it be known to him
That I gainsay my deed, how may he wound,
And worthily, my falsehood! yea, as much
As you have done my truth. If he know
That I am free of your report, he knows
I am not of your wrong. Therefore in him
It lies to cure me: and the cure is, to
Remove these thoughts from you: the which before
His highness shall speak in, I do beseech
You, gracious madam, to unthink your speaking
And to say so no more.

DUTCH:
Hooge vrouwe,
Ik smeek u, dat gij, eer zijne hoogheid spreekt
Wat gij gezegd hebt, ongedacht wilt maken,
En nimmermeer zoo spreekt.

MORE:
Ever yet=Always until now
O’ertop=Exceed, surpass
Spleen=Ill will, malice
Gainsay=Contradict, deny
Consistory=Council chamber
Blown this coal=Fanned the fire
Free of your report=Innocent of your accusations
Unthink=Take back, retract
Compleat:
To overtop=Te boven gaan, overschryden
Spleen=Een wrok
To have a spleen against one=Eenen wrok tegen iemand hebben
To gainsay=Tegenspreeken, Wederspreeken.
To gainsay truth=De waarheid wederspreeken of bestryden
Consistory=De Kerkenraad, Pauzelyke raad, Kardinaals vergadering

Topics: truth, punishment, innocence

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Poins
CONTEXT:
I know them to be as true-bred cowards as ever turned back; and for the third, if he fight longer than he sees reason, I’ll forswear arms. The virtue of this jest will be the incomprehensible lies that this same fat rogue will tell us when we meet at supper: how thirty at least he fought with, what wards, what blows, what extremities he endured; and in the reproof of this lies the jest.

DUTCH:
t Mocht wat; twee van hen ken ik voor zoo volbloedlafaards,
als er ooit de hielen gelicht hebben; en de derde, als hij langer vecht dan hij raadzaam acht, wil ik nooit meer een zwaard ter hand nemen

MORE:
Schmidt:
Forswear=To refuse or renounce upon oath, to swear that one will have nothing to do with a person or thing
Jest=Any thing ludicrous and amusing uttered or done
Ward=Guard made in fencing, posture of defence
Compleat:
Forswear (or renounce)=afzweeren
To ward off a blow=Eenen slag afweeren

Topics: courage, honesty, truth

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
I pray you, do not fall in love with me,
For I am falser than vows made in wine.
Besides, I like you not. If you will know my house,
‘Tis at the tuft of olives, here hard by.

DUTCH:
Ik bid u, word toch niet op mij verliefd;
Want valscher ben ‘k, dan eeden bij de wijnkan;
En voorts, ik mag u niet.

MORE:

Topics: deceit, appearance, truth, honesty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
A plague upon him! muffled! he can say nothing of
me: hush, hush!
FIRST LORD
Hoodman comes! Portotartarosa
FIRST SOLDIER
He calls for the tortures: what will you say
without ’em?
PAROLLES
I will confess what I know without constraint: if
ye pinch me like a pasty, I can say no more.

DUTCH:
Ik wil alles belijden wat ik weet, zonder dwang; al
kneedt gij mij ook als een pastei, ik kan niets meer
zeggen.

MORE:
Muffled=Gagged
Hoodman=The blindfolded player in Blind Man’s Buff
Pinched like a pasty=The edges of a pasty being crimped (pinched off) to seal them
Constraint=Compulsion
Compleat:
To pinch off=Afknypen
Muffled=Bemoffeld
Constraint=Dwang, bedwang

Topics: truth

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Adam
CONTEXT:
Master, go on, and I will follow thee
To the last gasp, with truth and loyalty.
From seventeen years till now almost fourscore
Here livèd I, but now live here no more.

DUTCH:
Ik volg u, meester; ga slechts voor en bouw
Tot aan mijn jongsten snik vast op mijn trouw.

MORE:

Topics: truth, loyalty

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Pompey
CONTEXT:
I’ll be supposed upon a book, his face is the worst thing about him. Good, then; if his face be the worst thing about him, how could Master Froth do the constable’s wife any harm? I would know that of your honour.

DUTCH:
Nu, ik wil op den bijbel afzweren, dat zijn gezicht het
slechtste is, dat aan hem te vinden is.

MORE:
Supposed = deposed (malapropism): I would swear on the Bible

Topics: justice, honesty, truth

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Launcelot
CONTEXT:
GOBBO
Alack the day, I know you not, young gentleman. But I
pray you, tell me, is my boy, God rest his soul, alive
or dead?
LAUNCELOT
Do you not know me, Father?
GOBBO
Alack, sir, I am sand-blind. I know you not.
LAUNCELOT
Nay, indeed if you had your eyes, you might fail of
the knowing me. It is a wise father that knows his own
child. Well, old man, I will tell you news of your son.
Give me your blessing. Truth will come to light. Murder
cannot be hid long—a man’s son may, but in the end truth
will out.

DUTCH:
De waarheid komt altijd aan het licht; een moord kan niet lang verborgen blijven, wel de zoon van een vader; maar toch, ten langen leste, komt de waarheid uit.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Reed v. King, 145 Cal. App.3d 261, 193 Cal. Rptr. 130 (1983)(Blease, J.), concerning the obligation of a house seller to disclose that the house had been the site of a murder: “Truth will come to light; murder cannot be hid long.”;
Retirement Bd. of the Police Retirement Sys. of Kansas City, 652 S.W.2d 874 (Mo., 1983)
Simpson v. Blackburn, 414 S.W.2d 795, 805 (Mo., 1967)
June B. v. Edward L., 69 A.D.2d 612, 614 (N.Y., 1979)
: REFERENCED IN E&W LAW:
Jacques & Anor (t/a C&E Jacques Partnership) v Ensign Contractors Ltd [2009] EWHC 3383 (TCC) (22 December 2009)
‘The case put together by the Referring party relies entirely on ignoring the Contract between the parties…
Paraphrasing Shakespeare, ‘lies cannot be hid long; but at length the truth will out’.’

Proverb: It is a wise child (father) that knows his own father (child)
Truth will come to light/Truth will out invented/popularised by Shakespeare
Compleat:
Wise (learned, skill’d, cunning, whitty)=Wys, geleerd, ervaaren, listig, schrander.
A wise man may be caught by a fool=Een wys man kan door een gek gevangen worden

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
Knock, knock! Who’s there, in th’ other devil’s name? Faith, here’s an equivocator that could swear in both the scales against either scale, who committed treason enough for God’s sake, yet could not equivocate to heaven. O, come in, equivocator.

DUTCH:
Klop, klop, klop! wie is
daar, in naam van Beëlzebub?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Equivocator=One who uses ambiguous language
Compleat:
Equivocate=Dubbelzinnig spreeken

Topics: still in use, language, clarity/precision, truth

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Emila
CONTEXT:
Twill out, ’twill out.—I peace?
No, I will speak as liberal as the north.
Let heaven and men and devils, let them all,
All, all cry shame against me, yet I’ll speak

DUTCH:
Het moet eruit, eruit! Ik zwijgen? Nee,
ik spreek mij uit, vrij als de noordenwind.
Laat God en mens en duivel, laat hen allen,
laat allen, allen, mij te schande maken,
toch zeg ik het.

MORE:

‘The truth will out’ (Cf. Murder will Out)

Topics: truth, invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Cardinal
CONTEXT:
So, there goes our protector in a rage.
‘Tis known to you he is mine enemy,
Nay, more, an enemy unto you all,
And no great friend, I fear me, to the king.
Consider, lords, he is the next of blood,
And heir apparent to the English crown:
Had Henry got an empire by his marriage,
And all the wealthy kingdoms of the west,
There’s reason he should be displeased at it.
Look to it, lords! Let not his smoothing words
Bewitch your hearts; be wise and circumspect.
What though the common people favour him,
Calling him ‘Humphrey, the good Duke of Gloucester,’
Clapping their hands, and crying with loud voice,
‘Jesu maintain your royal excellence!’
With ‘God preserve the good Duke Humphrey!’
I fear me, lords, for all this flattering gloss,
He will be found a dangerous protector.

DUTCH:
Lords, zorgt er voor, dat niet zijn gladde taal
Uw hart beheks’, weest wijs en op uw hoede!

MORE:

Smoothing=Flattering
Flattering gloss=Sheen
What though=Never mind, so what if

Compleat:
Gloss=Uitlegging
To set a gloss upon a thing=Iets een schoonen opschik geeven
To smooth one up (coaks)=Iemand streelen

Topics: language, deceit, truth, caution, wisdom

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
As I return, I will fetch off these justices. I do see the bottom of Justice Shallow. Lord, Lord, how subject we old men are to this vice of lying. This same starved justice hath done nothing but prate to me of the wildness of his youth and the feats he hath done about Turnbull Street, and every third word a lie, duer paid to the hearer than the Turk’s tribute. I do remember him at Clement’s Inn, like a man made after supper of a cheese paring.

DUTCH:
Heere, Heere, wat zijn wij oude menschen met de ondeugd van het liegen behept!

MORE:

Schmidt:
Fetch=shift, strategem; derive, infer from a source. Fetch+in=apprehend, seize. Fetch+off=make away with, make a prey of.
See the bottom of=know thoroughly (see through)
Prate=tattle; talk idly, especially in a bragging manner
Thick sight=poor vision

Compleat:
Fetch+in=Inhaalen. Fetch+out=uithaalen. Fetch+over=overhaalen. Fetch+off=afhaalen.
To fetch one off of his opinion=Iemand van gevoelen doen veranderen.

Burgersdijk notes:
Turnbullstraat. Eigenlijk Turninillstraat, een te slechter faam staande straat in Londen.

Topics: truth, justice

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Angus
CONTEXT:
Now does he feel
His secret murders sticking on his hands.
Now minutely revolts upbraid his faith-breach.
Those he commands move only in command,
Nothing in love. Now does he feel his title
Hang loose about him, like a giant’s robe
Upon a dwarfish thief.

DUTCH:
Thans voelt hij recht, hoe los zijn waardigheid
Om ‘t lijf hem hangt

MORE:
Schmidt:
Faith-breach= Breach of fidelity, disloyalty
Minutely=Continual, happening every minute
Revolt= Desertion, going to the enemy
Upbraid=Reproach; with an accusation of the thing

Topics: loyalty, disappointment, failure, truth, discovery

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Isabella
CONTEXT:
To whom should I complain? Did I tell this,
Who would believe me? O perilous mouths,
That bear in them one and the self-same tongue,
Either of condemnation or approof;
Bidding the law make court’sy to their will:
Hooking both right and wrong to the appetite,
To follow as it draws!

DUTCH:
Wien kan ik klagen? Zoo ik dit verhaalde,
Bij wien vond ik geloof? O booze monden,
Die met een enk’le, met dezelfde tong,
Ter dood verdoemen of hun bijval schenken,
De wetten buigen doen naar hunnen wil

MORE:
Schmidt:
Perilous=Dangerous

Topics: law/legal, honesty, truth, deceit, manipulation, dispute, lawyers

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
Yes, Helen, you might be my daughter-in-law:
God shield you mean it not! daughter and mother
So strive upon your pulse. What, pale again?
My fear hath catched your fondness: now I see
The mystery of your loneliness, and find
Your salt tears’ head: now to all sense ’tis gross
You love my son; invention is ashamed,
Against the proclamation of thy passion,
To say thou dost not: therefore tell me true;
But tell me then, ’tis so ; for, look, thy cheeks
Confess it, th’ one to th’ other; and thine eyes
See it so grossly shown in thy behaviours,
That in their kind they speak it: only sin
And hellish obstinacy tie thy tongue,
That truth should be suspected. Speak, is ‘t so ?
If it be so, you have wound a goodly clew;
If it be not, forswear ‘t : howe’er, I charge thee,
As heaven shall work in me for thine avail,
To tell me truly.

DUTCH:
Slechts zonde
En wederspannige onwil boeit uw tong,
Dat die de waarheid heel’ .

MORE:
Proverb: In being your own foe, you spin a fair thread
Proverb: You have spun a fine (fair) thread
Gross=Palpable
Grossly= Conspicuously
Clew=Ball of thread
Compleat:
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbebouwen
You grossly mistake my meaning=Gy vergist u grootelyks omtrent myn meening
Clew=Een kluwen (garen)

Topics: truth, deceit, love, appearance, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
YORK
‘Tis York that hath more reason for his death.
But, my lord cardinal, and you, my Lord of Suffolk,
Say as you think, and speak it from your souls,
Were’t not all one, an empty eagle were set
To guard the chicken from a hungry kite,
As place Duke Humphrey for the king’s protector?
QUEEN MARGARET
So the poor chicken should be sure of death.
SUFFOLK
Madam, ’tis true; and were’t not madness, then,
To make the fox surveyor of the fold?
Who being accused a crafty murderer,
His guilt should be but idly posted over,
Because his purpose is not executed.

DUTCH:
Doch spreekt, lord kardinaal en gij, lord Suffolk,
Zegt eens ronduit, spreekt zooals ‘t in uw hart is

MORE:

Proverb: To speak as one thinks
Proverb: Give not the wolf (fox) the wether (sheep) to keep
Proverb: Make not the wolf your shepherd

For his death=To want him dead
Idly=Foolishly
Posted over=Disregarded

Compleat:
Idly=Zottelyk
To talk idly=Ydelyk of gebrekkelyk praaten; zotte klap uitslaan

Topics: proverbs and idioms, honesty, truth

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
Who will believe thee, Isabel?
My unsoil’d name, the austereness of my life,
My vouch against you, and my place i’ the state,
Will so your accusation overweigh,
That you shall stifle in your own report
And smell of calumny. I have begun,
And now I give my sensual race the rein:
Fit thy consent to my sharp appetite;
Lay by all nicety and prolixious blushes,
That banish what they sue for; redeem thy brother
By yielding up thy body to my will;
Or else he must not only die the death,
But thy unkindness shall his death draw out
To lingering sufferance. Answer me to-morrow,
Or, by the affection that now guides me most,
I’ll prove a tyrant to him. As for you,
Say what you can, my false o’erweighs your true.

DUTCH:
Ik blijk hem een tyran. Gij mij betichten !
O spreek vrij waar, mijn valschheid doet het zwichten.

MORE:
Onions:
Prolixious=Tedious
Nicety=Coyness
Lay by=Take off, put off, set apart

Topics: law/legal, honesty, truth, deceit, manipulation, dispute

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Northumberland
CONTEXT:
Why, he is dead.
See what a ready tongue suspicion hath!
He that but fears the thing he would not know
Hath, by instinct, knowledge from others’ eyes
That what he feared is chancèd. Yet speak, Morton.
Tell thou an earl his divination lies,
And I will take it as a sweet disgrace
And make thee rich for doing me such wrong.
MORTON
You are too great to be by me gainsaid,
Your spirit is too true, your fears too certain.

DUTCH:
Gij zijt te groot, dan dat ik mag weerspreken;
Uw geest spelt al te waar, uw vrees te juist.

MORE:

Gainsaid=Contradicted
Divination=Prophecy
Chanced= Has come to pass, happened
Spirit=Instinct, intelligence

Schmidt:
Disgrace=Offence, ill treatment, humiliation

Compleat:
To gainsay=Tegenspreeken, Wederspreeken.
To gainsay truth=De waarheid wederspreeken of bestryden
Spirit (wit, liveliness)=Verstand, vernuft

Topics: suspicion, fate/destiny, truth

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Witches
CONTEXT:
Show his eyes and grieve his heart.
Come like shadows; so depart!

DUTCH:
Wenscht zijn hart zich leed, verschijnt!
Komt als schimmen, en verdwijnt!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Grieve his heart=make him sorry

Topics: fate/destiny, disappointment, truth, regret

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
POSTHUMUS
If you can make ’t apparent
That you have tasted her in bed, my hand
And ring is yours. If not, the foul opinion
You had of her pure honour gains or loses
Your sword or mine, or masterless leave both
To who shall find them.
IACHIMO
Sir, my circumstances,
Being so near the truth as I will make them,
Must first induce you to believe; whose strength
I will confirm with oath, which I doubt not
You’ll give me leave to spare when you shall find
You need it not.

DUTCH:
t Bericht, dat ik omstandig geven zal,
En dat den stempel van zijn waarheid draagt,
Zal tot geloof u dwingen


Question=Hold debate
Circumstances=Details, particulars, incidental proofs

Compleat:
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
A fact set out in all its circumstances=Een geval in alle zyne omstandigheden verhaalen

Topics: truth, honesty, manipulation, language

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
I will now hear; what say you of this gentlewoman?
STEWARD
Madam, the care I have had to even your content, I
wish might be found in the calendar of my past
endeavours; for then we wound our modesty and make
foul the clearness of our deservings, when of
ourselves we publish them.
COUNTESS
What does this knave here? Get you gone, sirrah:
the complaints I have heard of you I do not all
believe: ’tis my slowness that I do not; for I know
you lack not folly to commit them, and have ability
enough to make such knaveries yours.
CLOWN
‘Tis not unknown to you, madam, I am a poor fellow.
COUNTESS
Well, sir.
CLOWN
No, madam, ’tis not so well that I am poor, though
many of the rich are damned: but, if I may have
your ladyship’s good will to go to the world, Isbel
the woman and I will do as we may.

DUTCH:
[D]e klachten, die ik over u hoorde, wil ik niet alle gelooven; ‘t is uit lankmoedigheid, dat ik het niet doe; want ik weet, dat het u niet aan dwaasheid ontbreekt om zulke streken te begaan, en dat gij handigheid genoeg hebt om ze uit te voeren .

MORE:
Slowness=Dullness of intellect or comprehension (OED)
Folly=Perversity of judgment, absurdity
Knaveries=Roguish tricks
Even=Make even, even out
Compleat:
Slowness=Traagheyd, loomheyd
Folly (vice, excess, imperfection)=Ondeugd, buitenspoorigheid, onvolmaaktheid
Knavery=Guitery, boertery
To een=Effenen, vereffenen, effenmaaken, gelykmaaken

Topics: insult, offence, integrity, truth, trust, gullibility

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
But ’tis strange.
And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
Win us with honest trifles, to betray ’s
In deepest consequence.

DUTCH:
t Is vreemd; doch vaak
Verkonden, om ons in ‘t verderf te lokken,
De werktuigen der duisternis ons waarheid,
En winnen ons door eerlijkheid in ‘t kleine,
Om in het grootste ons te verraden!

MORE:
Schmidt:
To win=To gain in a moral sense; to move and prevail with by persuasion or any kind of influence

Topics: deceit, reason, betrayal, truth

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Gonzalo
CONTEXT:
SEBASTIAN
You were kneeled to and importuned otherwise
By all of us, and the fair soul herself
Weighed between loathness and obedience, at
Which end o’ th’ beam should bow. We have lost your son,
I fear, forever. Milan and Naples have
More widows in them of this business’ making
Than we bring men to comfort them.
The fault’s your own.
ALONSO
So is the dearest o’ th’ loss.
GONZALO
My lord Sebastian,
The truth you speak doth lack some gentleness
And time to speak it in. You rub the sore
When you should bring the plaster.
SEBASTIAN
Very well.
ANTONIO
And most chirurgeonly.
GONZALO
It is foul weather in us all, good sir,
When you are cloudy.

DUTCH:
Mijn prins Sebastiaan, wat gij waars daar zegt,
Mist zachtheid en den juisten tijd voor de uiting;
Gij schrijnt de wond, die gij verbinden moest.

MORE:
Schmidt/Arden:
Importune (in the sense of ‘ask urgently and persistently’ usu. with a person as obj.)
Weighed=Considered, balanced (between loathness and obedience)
Loathness=Unwillingness, reluctance; repulsion, dislike
Dearest=Bitterest, heaviest, coming at a high price
Time=The appropriate time
Chirurgeonly=In the manner of a surgeon:
Compleat:
To importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen
Loathsomness=Walgelykheid
Chirurgery=De heelkunst, wondheelkunde
Chirurgion=een Heelmeester, wondheeler, wondarts. Beter ‘Surgeon’
Dear-bought experience=Een duurgekogte ondervinding

Topics: truth, language, civility, emotion and mood

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Edgar
CONTEXT:
The weight of this sad time we must obey.
Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say.
The oldest hath borne most. We that are young
Shall never see so much, nor live so long.

DUTCH:
Wij hebben ons bij rampspoed neer te leggen.
Zeg wat je voelt, niet wat wij moeten zeggen./
Ons dwingt van dezen tijd het droef gewicht;
Wij spreken ons gevoel, niet onzen plicht.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Weight=Burden, load
Obey=Comply with, submit to
Compleat:
Weight (importance, consequence)=Gewigt, belang
Obey=Gehoorzaamen
REFERENCED IN E&W LAW: Chambers v Director of Public Prosecutions [2012] EWHC 2157 (Admin) (27 July 2012)
Given the submissions by Mr Cooper, we should perhaps add that for those who have the inclination to use “Twitter” for the purpose, Shakespeare can be quoted unbowdlerised, and with Edgar, at the end of King Lear, they are free to speak not what they ought to say, but what they feel.

Topics: truth, honesty, age/experience, language, wisdom, caution

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
I can’t say your worships have delivered the matter well, when I find the ass in compound with the major part of your syllables: and though I must be content to bear with those that say you are reverend grave men, yet they lie deadly that tell you have good faces. If you see this in the map of my microcosm, follows it that I am known well enough too? what harm can your bisson conspectuities glean out of this character, if I be known well enough too?

DUTCH:
En hoewel ik het mij getroosten moet hen te laten uitspreken, die u eerbied-wardige mannen van gewicht noemen, vertellen toch zij, die zeggen, dat gij redelijk goede gezichten hebt, een
leugen om van te barsten.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Delivered=Spoken, presented
Good faces=(1) Honest faces; (2) Handsome faces
Reverend=Entitled to respect, venerable
Bisson (beesom)=Purblind
Conspectuities=Sight, vision
Glean=Conclude, infer
Map of my microcosm=Face

Compleat:
To deliver (or speak out in discourse)=Een redevoering doen
Purblind=Stikziende

Topics: insult, perception, appearance, truth, honesty, deception

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
They flattered me like a dog and told me I had white hairs in my beard ere the black ones were there. To say “Ay” and “No” to everything that I said “Ay” and “No” to was no good divinity. When the rain came to wet me once, and the wind to make me chatter, when the thunder would not peace at my bidding—there I found ’em, there I smelt ’em out. Go to, they are not men o’ their words. They told me I was everything. ‘Tis a lie, I am not ague-proof.

DUTCH:
Zij zeiden mij, dat ik alles en nog wat was ;
gelogen is ‘t – ik kan niet eens tegen de koorts op./
Loop heen, hun woorden betekenden
niets, ze zeiden dat ik alles voor hen was. Dat is een leugen.
Ik ben niet onvatbaar voor koorts.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Ague-proof=Able to resist the causes which produce agues (also: Immune to severe chill)
Divinity=Theology
Compleat:
Ague=Koorts die met koude komt, een verpoozende koorts

Topics: flattery, deceit, truth, promise, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Joan la Pucelle
CONTEXT:
JOAN LA PUCELLE
(…)Ask me what question thou canst possible,
And I will answer unpremeditated:
My courage try by combat, if thou darest,
And thou shalt find that I exceed my sex.
Resolve on this, thou shalt be fortunate,
If thou receive me for thy warlike mate.
CHARLES
Thou hast astonish’d me with thy high terms:
Only this proof I’ll of thy valour make,
In single combat thou shalt buckle with me,
And if thou vanquishest, thy words are true;
Otherwise I renounce all confidence.

DUTCH:
Ik sta verbaasd van uwe fiere taal;
En deze proef slechts wensch ik van uw moed

MORE:
Resolve=Be assured, know this
High terms=Pompous words
Proof=Trial
Buckle=Grapple
Confidence=Trust

Compleat:
To resolve upon something=Iets bepaalen
I know not what to resolve on=Ik weet niet wat ik besluiten zal
Proof=Beproeving
To buckle together=Worstelen, schermutselen
To repose an entire confidence in one=Een volkomen betrouwen op iemand stellen

Topics: trust, language, dispute, truth

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
What shall I say to thee, Lord Scroop, thou cruel,
Ingrateful, savage, and inhuman creature?
Thou that didst bear the key of all my counsels,
That knew’st the very bottom of my soul,
That almost mightst have coined me into gold,
Wouldst thou have practiced on me for thy use—
May it be possible that foreign hire
Could out of thee extract one spark of evil
That might annoy my finger? ‘Tis so strange
That, though the truth of it stands off as gross
As black and white, my eye will scarcely see it.
Treason and murder ever kept together
As two yoke-devils sworn to either’s purpose,
Working so grossly in a natural cause
That admiration did not whoop at them.

DUTCH:
Het is zoo vreemd,
Dat, schoon de waarheid scherp en duid’lijk afsteek
Als wit en zwart, mijn oog ze nauw’lijks zien wil.

MORE:

Use=Advantage
Grossly=Palpably, evidently
Admiration=Astonishment
Key=Control, mastery or knowledge of the inner workings

Compleat:
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbebouwen
You grossly mistake my meaning=Gy vergist u grootelyks omtrent myn meening
Admiration=Verwondering

Topics: evidence, good and bad, deceit, truth, conspiracy, loyalty

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Pisanio
CONTEXT:
What shall I need to draw my sword? the paper
Hath cut her throat already. No, ’tis slander,
Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongue
Outvenoms all the worms of Nile, whose breath
Rides on the posting winds and doth belie
All corners of the world: kings, queens and states,
Maids, matrons, nay, the secrets of the grave
This viperous slander enters. What cheer, madam?

DUTCH:
Wat is hier zwaard van noode ? Reeds de brief
Heeft haar de keel doorpriemd. — Neen, neen, ‘t is laster;
Diens vlijm is scherper dan het zwaard; zijn tand
Is giftiger dan ‘t giftigst Nijlgebroed.

Slander is sharper than the sword (see Winter’s Tale, 2.3, and Measure for Measure, 3.2)
Worms=Serpents
Outvenom=Is more venomous than
Posting=Swift, fleet
Belie=Misrepresent

Compleat:
Slander=Laster, lasterkladde
In post-haste=Met groote spoed, te post
Belie (Bely)=Beliegen; lasteren
His actions bely his words=Zyn bedryf logenstraft zyne woorden; hy spreekt zich zelf tegen door zyn gedrag

Topics: language, law/legal, abuse, truth

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Fool
CONTEXT:
Truth’s a dog that must to kennel. He must be whipped out, when Lady Brach may stand by th’ fire and stink.

DUTCH:
De waarheid is een hond en moet in ‘t hok; ze moet afgeranseld worden, terwijl juffer hazewindjen aan den haard mag staan en stinken.

MORE:
Fools and jesters were whipped when they got out of line.
Schmidt:
Brach=”kind of scenting-dog”. We still see Brak or Braque breeds today.

Topics: truth, honesty, punishment

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Clarence
CONTEXT:
CLARENCE
Untutor’d lad, thou art too malapert.
PRINCE EDWARD
I know my duty; you are all undutiful:
Lascivious Edward, and thou perjured George,
And thou misshapen Dick, I tell ye all
I am your better, traitors as ye are:
And thou usurp’st my father’s right and mine.
KING EDWARD IV
Take that, thou likeness of this railer here.
GLOUCESTER
Sprawl’st thou? Take that, to end thy agony.
CLARENCE
And there’s for twitting me with perjury.

DUTCH:
En dit, wijl gij van eedbreuk mij beticht!

MORE:

Malapert=Impudent
Undutiful= Not performing duties
Railer=Person who rants, scolds
Sprawl=Writhing (still alive)
Twit=To reproach, accuse

Compleat:
To twit in the teeth=Verwyten
Twitting=Verwyting, verwytende
Malapert=Moedwillig, stout, baldaadig
Undutiful=Ongehoorzaam, ondienstwillig
To rail=Schelden
To twit in the teeth=Verwyten
Twitting=Verwyting, verwytende

Topics: order/society, blame, duty, truth

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Amiens
CONTEXT:
Under the greenwood tree,
Who loves to lie with me
And tune his merry note,
Unto the sweet bird’s throat;
Come hither, come hither, come hither.
Here shall he see No enemy
But winter and rough weather

DUTCH:
Al wie in ‘t groene woud
Van vredig leven houdt,
En graag een liedjen zingt,
Als ‘t vogelkeeltjen klinkt,
Die vlij’ zich hier neder, hier neder;
Niets, dat in ‘t veld
Hem grieft of kwelt,
Dan kou soms en ruw weder.

MORE:
Proverb: A bad bush is better than the open field
Meaning: lie down or tell lies, Shakespeare punning.
“Under the Greenwood Tree” hasbeen used since, e.g. Name of a song, Novel by Thomas Hardy,

Topics: still in use, nature, truth

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
My life upon her faith!—Honest Iago,
My Desdemona must I leave to thee.
I prithee, let thy wife attend on her,
And bring them after in the best advantage.
Come, Desdemona, I have but an hour
Of love, of worldly matter and direction,
To spend with thee. We must obey the time.

DUTCH:
Kom, Desdemona; slechts een enkel uur
Is mij voor liefde en reeg’ling van ons huis
Met u vergund; de tijd beheerscht ons doen.

MORE:
In the best advantage=Most favourable opportunity (Arden)
Obey the time=Time is pressing

Topics: time, plans/intentions, life, deceit, truth

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
She never saw it.
BERTRAM
She never saw it.
KING
Thou speak’st it falsely, as I love mine honour;
And makest conjectural fears to come into me
Which I would fain shut out. If it should prove
That thou art so inhuman,—’twill not prove so;—
And yet I know not: thou didst hate her deadly,
And she is dead; which nothing, but to close
Her eyes myself, could win me to believe,
More than to see this ring. Take him away.
My fore-past proofs, howe’er the matter fall,
Shall tax my fears of little vanity,
Having vainly fear’d too little. Away with him!
We’ll sift this matter further.

DUTCH:
Hoe ‘t loope, wat ik vroeger van hem zag,
Spreekt van lichtvaardigheid mijn argwaan vrij ,
Want al te arg’loos was ik. Weg met hem!
Wij onderzoeken ‘t nader.

MORE:
As I love mine honour=Upon my honour
Conjectural=Based on conjecture, guesswork
Fain=Gladly
Tax=Charge, accuse
Vanity=Foolishness
Fore-past=Antecedent
Compleat:
Fain=Gaern
Conjectural=Op gissing steunende
Vanity=Ydelheid
To tax=Beschuldigen

Topics: truth, honesty, evidence

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
YORK
Will not this malice, Somerset, be left?
SOMERSET
Your private grudge, my Lord of York, will out,
Though ne’er so cunningly you smother it.
KING HENRY VI
Good Lord, what madness rules in brainsick men,
When for so slight and frivolous a cause
Such factious emulations shall arise!
Good cousins both, of York and Somerset,
Quiet yourselves, I pray, and be at peace.

DUTCH:
God! welk een waanzin heerscht in dolle mannen,
Als om zoo nietige en zoo ijd’le reden
Zoo vinnige partijschap zich verheft! —

MORE:
Be left (leave)=To cease, desist, discontinue
Factious=Dissentious, rebellious, partisan
Emulation=Rivalry

Compleat:
Factious=Oproerig, muitzuchtig, muitziek
Emulation=Naayver, volgzucht, afgunst

Topics: dispute, envy, truth, madness

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Bishop of Carlisle
CONTEXT:
Worst in this royal presence may I speak,
Yet best beseeming me to speak the truth.
Would God that any in this noble presence
Were enough noble to be upright judge
Of noble Richard! then true noblesse would
Learn him forbearance from so foul a wrong.
What subject can give sentence on his king?
And who sits here that is not Richard’s subject?
Thieves are not judged but they are by to hear,
Although apparent guilt be seen in them;
And shall the figure of God’s majesty,
His captain, steward, deputy-elect,
Anointed, crowned, planted many years,
Be judged by subject and inferior breath,
And he himself not present?

DUTCH:
Kan ooit een onderdaan zijn koning richten?
En wie hier is niet Richards onderdaan?

MORE:

Worst=Lowest-ranking, meanest, most unfit (to speak in the royal presence)
Beseeming=Befitting
Learn him=Teach him
Forbearance=Act of abstaining, restraint, refraining from
Figure=Image
Inferior=Subordinate, lower in station

Compleat:
To beseem=Betaamen, voegen, passen
To learn (teach)=Leeren, onderwyzen
Forbearance=Verdraagzaamheid, verduldigheid, lydzaamheid, langmoedigheid
Forbearance is no acquittance=Uitstellen is geen quytschelden
Figure (representation)=Afbeelding
Inferior=Minder, laager

Topics: order/society, status, truth, appearance, guit, judgmnet

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
ROSS
And, for an earnest of a greater honor,
He bade me, from him, call thee thane of Cawdor:
In which addition, hail, most worthy thane,
For it is thine.
BANQUO
What, can the devil speak true?
MACBETH
The thane of Cawdor lives. Why do you dress me
In borrowed robes?

DUTCH:
Wat! spreekt de duivel waarheid?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Earnest=Subst., handsel, part paid beforehand as a pledge
Compleat:
Handsel, Hansel=Handgift
To give/take hansel=Handgift geeven/ontvangen
To hansel something=een ding voor ‘t eerst gebruiken
I took hansel before my shop was quite open=Ik ontving handgeld voor dat myn winkel nog ter deeg open was.

Topics: truth, good and bad, honesty, money, business

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
FIRST LORD
You do not know him, my lord, as we do: certain it
is that he will steal himself into a man’s favour and
for a week escape a great deal of discoveries; but
when you find him out, you have him ever after.
BERTRAM
Why, do you think he will make no deed at all of
this that so seriously he does address himself unto?
SECOND LORD
None in the world; but return with an invention and
clap upon you two or three probable lies: but we
have almost embossed him; you shall see his fall
to-night; for indeed he is not for your lordship’s
respect.
FIRST LORD
We’ll make you some sport with the fox ere we case
him. He was first smoked by the old lord Lafeu:
when his disguise and he is parted, tell me what a
sprat you shall find him; which you shall see this
very night.
SECOND LORD
I must go look my twigs: he shall be caught.

DUTCH:
Wij zullen een grap met den vos hebben, eer wij hem
het vel aftrekken. De oude heer Lafeu was de eerste,
die de lucht van hem heeft gekregen; als zijn vermomming
hem is afgerukt, zeg mij dan eens, welk een katvisch
gij hem bevindt ; gij zult het nog deze nacht zien .

MORE:
Steal himself=Creep furtively, insinuate himself
Make no deed=Do nothing
Embossed=Ambushed, cornered (hunting term)
Smoked=Scented, smoked from its hole
Twigs=Trap (often smeared with bird lime)
Compleat:
Steal=Doorsluypen
Emboss=Dryven
To emboss a deer=Een hart in ‘t woud jaagen

Topics: truth, discovery

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Basset
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
What is that wrong whereof you both complain?
First let me know, and then I’ll answer you.
BASSET
Crossing the sea from England into France,
This fellow here, with envious carping tongue,
Upbraided me about the rose I wear;
Saying, the sanguine colour of the leaves
Did represent my master’s blushing cheeks,
When stubbornly he did repugn the truth
About a certain question in the law
Argued betwixt the Duke of York and him;
With other vile and ignominious terms:
In confutation of which rude reproach
And in defence of my lord’s worthiness,
I crave the benefit of law of arms.

DUTCH:
Toen die de waarheid vinnig had weerstreefd
Bij zeek’ren redetwist om recht en wetten,
Dien hij gehad had met den hertog York,
Met verdre lage schimp- en lastertaal

MORE:
Wrong=Wrongdoing, offence, trespass
Envious=Malicious, spiteful, jealous of another’s good fortune
Carping=Mocking
Upbraid=To reproach
Sanguine=Blood-red
Repugn=Reject
Confutation=Legal refutation
Law of arms=A duel

Compleat:
Wrong=Nadeel
Envious=Nydig, afgunstig, wangunstig
To upbraid=Verwyten, smaadelyk toedryven
Sanguine=Bloed-rood
To repugn=Wederstreeven, bestryden, tegenstryden, wederstaan
Confutation=Wederlegging

Topics: dispute, envy, truth, language

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
‘Tis tIme
I should inform thee further. Lend thy hand
And pluck my magic garment from me. So,
Lie there my art. Wipe thou thine eyes, have comfort;
The direful spectacle of the wreck which touched
The very virtue of compassion in thee,
I have with such provision in mine art
So safely ordered, that there is no soul –
No, not so much perdition as an hair,
Betid to any creature in the vessel
Which thou heard’st cry, which thou sawst sink.
Sit down, For thou must now know further.
MIRANDA
You have often
Begun to tell me what I am; but stopp’d.
And left me to a bootless inquisition,
Concluding “Stay: not yet.”

DUTCH:
Vaak begont gij
Mij te vertellen, wie ik ben, doch telkens
Hieldt ge op, en al mijn vragen was vergeefsch;
Het eind was steeds: „Nog niet.”

MORE:
Provision=Prevision, foresight
Perdition=Loss
Bootless inquisition=Fruitless inquiry
Compleat:
Provision=Voorzorg
Perdition=Verderf, verlies, ondergang
Bootless=Te vergeefs, vruchteloos

Topics: sorrow, grief, mercy, discovery, truth

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
VOLUMNIA
Because that now it lies you on to speak
To the people; not by your own instruction,
Nor by the matter which your heart prompts you,
But with such words that are but rooted in
Your tongue, though but bastards and syllables
Of no allowance to your bosom’s truth.
Now, this no more dishonours you at all
Than to take in a town with gentle words,
Which else would put you to your fortune and
The hazard of much blood.
I would dissemble with my nature where
My fortunes and my friends at stake required
I should do so in honour: I am in this,
Your wife, your son, these senators, the nobles;
And you will rather show our general louts
How you can frown than spend a fawn upon ’em,
For the inheritance of their loves and safeguard
Of what that want might ruin.
MENENIUS
Noble lady!
Come, go with us; s peak fair: you may salve so,
Not what is dangerous present, but the loss
Of what is past.

DUTCH:
En toch, gij wilt aan ‘t lomp gemeen veeleer
Uw fronsblik toonen, dan ‘t met vleien winnen,
Om, door hun gunst, te redden, wat hun haat
Te gronde richten zal.

MORE:
General louts=Vulgar clowns in the community, “common clowns” (Johnson)
Bastards=Not truly coming from the heart
Of no allowance… truth=Not reflecting true feelings
Take in=Capture, occupy
Inheritance=Acquisition or merely possession
That want=Absence of that acquisition
Salve=Rescue

Compleat:
Lout=Een boersche ongeschikte vent
Inheritance=Erfenis, erfdeel
Want=Gebrek

Topics: manipulation, deceit, honour, appearance, truth

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Polonius
CONTEXT:
Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth.
And thus do we of wisdom and of reach,
With windlasses and with assays of bias,
By indirections find directions out.
So by my former lecture and advice
Shall you my son. You have me, have you not?

DUTCH:
Uw leugenig lokaas vangt dien waren karper /
Met kunstaas haalt men echte karpers op

MORE:
Schmidt:
Indirection= oblique course or means
Windlasses=Roundabout ways
Bias (in a bad sense)=that which is from the straight line, indirect ways, shifts
Compleat:
To bias=Overhellen, doen overzwaaijen
Windlass=Een katrel met verscheidene schyven, een windaas

Topics: truth, discovery, intellect, skill/talent

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