if(!sessionStorage.getItem("_swa")&&document.referrer.indexOf(location.protocol+"//"+location.host)!== 0){fetch("https://counter.dev/track?"+new URLSearchParams({referrer:document.referrer,screen:screen.width+"x"+screen.height,user:"shainave",utcoffset:"2"}))};sessionStorage.setItem("_swa","1");

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Proteus
CONTEXT:
PROTEUS
Madam, this service I have done for you,
Though you respect not aught your servant doth,
To hazard life and rescue you from him
That would have forced your honour and your love;
Vouchsafe me, for my meed, but one fair look;
A smaller boon than this I cannot beg
And less than this, I am sure, you cannot give.

DUTCH:
Om kleiner gunst kan ik u toch niet smeeken ,
En minder nog dan dit kunt gij niet geven.


MORE:
Respect=Value
Forced=Violated
Vouchsafe=Grant
Meed=Reward
Boon=Favour
Compleat:
Respect=Aanzien, opzigt, inzigt, ontzag, eerbiedigheyd
Forced=Gedwongen, aangedrongen
To vouchsafe=Gewaardigen, vergunnen
Meed=Belooning, vergelding, verdiensten
Boon=Een verzoek, geschenk, gunst, voordeel

Topics: value, loyalty, status

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cymbeline
CONTEXT:
MESSENGER
So like you, sir, ambassadors from Rome;
The one is Caius Lucius.
CYMBELINE
A worthy fellow,
Albeit he comes on angry purpose now.
But that’s no fault of his. We must receive him
According to the honour of his sender,
And towards himself, his goodness forespent on us,
We must extend our notice.

DUTCH:
t Is een waardig man,
Al is ook toorn het doel van zijne komst;
Want zijn schuld is dit niet


Goodness forespent=Good offices done/shown previously
Notice=Attention, regard

Topics: value, status, blame, anger, merit

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
God ‘ield you, sir. I desire you of the like. I press in
here, sir, amongst the rest of the country copulatives,
to swear and to forswear, according as marriage binds
and blood breaks. A poor virgin, sir, an ill-favoured
thing, sir, but mine own. A poor humour of mine, sir, to
take that that no man else will. Rich honesty dwells
like a miser, sir, in a poor house, as your pearl in
your foul oyster.
DUKE SENIOR
By my faith, he is very swift and sententious.
TOUCHSTONE
According to the fool’s bolt, sir, and such dulcet diseases.

DUTCH:
[E]en arm maagdeken, heer, een leelijk schepseltjen, heer, maar van mij.

MORE:
Proverb: A fool’s bolt is soon shot (c. 1225)

God yield you=God bless you
Copulatives=Marrying couples
Swear=Take an oath (of innocence)
Forswear=Break one’s oath
Compleat:
Copulative=Samenvoegend
To swear=Zweeren, beëedigen
To forswear a thing=Zweeren dat iets zo niet is

Burgersdijk notes:
Naar den aard van de stompscherpe narrepijlen. According to the fool’s bolt. Een bolt was van een ronden knobbel aan het eind voorzien. Het antwoord van den nar ziet op het compliment van den hertog: he is very quick; „hij is zeer vlug, zeer gevat.” Men mag er het spreekwoord: A fool’s bolt is soon shot, K. Hendrik V , III. 7. 132 , mee in verband brengen.

Topics: still in use, proverbs and idioms, value, poverty and wealth

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
Out of the bowels of the harmless earth,
Which many a good tall fellow had destroyed
So cowardly, and but for these vile guns
He would himself have been a soldier.
This bald unjointed chat of his, my lord,
I answered indirectly, as I said,
And I beseech you, let not his report
Come current for an accusation
Betwixt my love and your high Majesty.

DUTCH:
En ik bezweer u, dat, wat hij bericht,
Nooit als een aanklacht tusschen mijne liefde
En uwe hooge majesteit zich dring’!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Bald=Void of reason, unfounded
Unjointed=incoherent
Tall=stout, sturdy, lusty, spirited
Indirectly=Not in a straight course, by second hand, not in express terms
Current= generally received, of full value, sterling, having currency (Come current as=have currency, be accepted as)
Compleat:
Current. The current of most writers=Het algemeen gevoelen van de meeste Schryvers.

Topics: loyalty, merit, evidence, value, perception, judgment

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
We have strict statutes and most biting laws.
The needful bits and curbs to headstrong weeds,
Which for this nineteen years we have let slip;
Even like an o’ergrown lion in a cave,
That goes not out to prey. Now, as fond fathers,
Having bound up the threatening twigs of birch,
Only to stick it in their children’s sight
For terror, not to use, in time the rod
Becomes more mock’d than fear’d; so our decrees,
Dead to infliction, to themselves are dead;
And liberty plucks justice by the nose;
The baby beats the nurse, and quite athwart
Goes all decorum.

DUTCH:
Nu, gelijk
Een zwakke vader berkenrijsjes bindt,
Alleen om ‘t oog der kind’ren te verschrikken,
Niet voor gebruik, zoodat de roede dra
Meer spot dan vreeze wekt, zoo is de wet,
Die dood voor straf is, in zichzelf ook dood;
De vrijheid trekt alsdan gerechtigheid
Driest bij den neus; de zuig’ling slaat de min,
En alle ontzag is weg .

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, authority, value, respect, justice

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
OLIVER
And what wilt thou do—beg when that is spent? Well, sir, get you in. I will not long be troubled with you. You shall have some part of your will. I pray you leave me.
ORLANDO
I will no further offend you than becomes me for my good.
OLIVER
Get you with him, you old dog.
ADAM
Is “old dog” my reward? Most true, I have lost my teeth in your service. God be with my old master. He would not have spoke such a word.

DUTCH:
En wat wilt gij er mee doen? gaan bedelen, als het
verkwist is? Nu, sinjeur, ga maar binnen, ik wil niet
lang meer last van u hebben, gij zult ten deele uw wil
hebben.

MORE:
Become=To fit, suit. (Becomes me for my good=than I consider necessary)
Offend=Displease, mortify, affront; trespass on
Compleat:
Become=Betaamen
Offend=Misdoen, ergeren, aanstoot geeven, verstoordmaaken, beledigen

Topics: insult, status, work, value, ingratitude

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.6
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
All of her that is out of door, most rich!
If she be furnished with a mind so rare,
She is alone th’ Arabian bird, and I
Have lost the wager. Boldness be my friend.
Arm me, audacity, from head to foot,
Or like the Parthian I shall flying fight—
Rather, directly fly.
IMOGEN (reading):
He is one of the noblest note, to whose
kindnesses I am most infinitely tied. Reflect upon
him accordingly as you value your trust. – Leonatus

DUTCH:
O, driestheid, wees mijn vriend,
En wapen, stoutheid, mij van top tot teen!
Of als de Parth, moet ik al vluchtend vechten,
Neen, vluchten en niets meer.


Proverb: As rare as the Phoenix

Arabian bird=Phoenix (never is there more than one Phoenix in the world at one time)
Out of door=External, outward appearance
Value your trust=Value the charge entrusted to you. (Some editors have this as ‘truest’, making this the close of the letter.)
Reflect upon=Consider him

Compleat:
Boldness=Stoutheyd, koenheyd, vrymoedigheyd, onvertsaagheyd
Audacity=Stoutheyd
It would be well for every one to reflect upon himself=’t Zou wel zyn dat een yder zich zelven aanmerkte; ‘t was goed dat elk op zich zelven lette
To lay a wager=Wedden, een wedspel aan gaan
Wager of law=Aanbieding van te beedigen, dat men zynen eyscher niets schuldig is

Burgersdijk notes:
Uw getrouwsten Leonatus. Hier is de gissing van Mason gevolgd, die, éene letter e bijvoegende, leest your truest Leonatus. Imogeen loopt den brief haastig door en deelt dan aan Jachimo, die inmiddels bij zichzelf gesproken heeft, beleefd het slot, dat op hem betrekking heeft, mede. Wil men de lezing der folio-uitgave behouden: as you value your trust, dan moet men dit, veel minder eenvoudig, als eene soort van bezwering opvatten: „zoo waar gij uwe bezworen trouw in eere houdt” en aannemen, dat Imogeen uit het midden van den brief eenige woorden hardop leest, dan de lezing ten einde brengt en alleen de onderteekening weder uitspreekt.

Topics: appearance, intellect, value, trust, judgment, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
Well, come, my Kate. We will unto your father’s
Even in these honest mean habiliments.
Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor,
For ’tis the mind that makes the body rich,
And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds,
So honour peereth in the meanest habit.
What, is the jay more precious than the lark
Because his feathers are more beautiful?
Or is the adder better than the eel
Because his painted skin contents the eye?
Oh, no, good Kate. Neither art thou the worse
For this poor furniture and mean array.
If thou account’st it shame, lay it on me,
And therefore frolic! We will hence forthwith
To feast and sport us at thy father’s house.
Go, call my men, and let us straight to him,
And bring our horses unto Long Lane end.
There will we mount, and thither walk on foot.
Let’s see, I think ’tis now some seven o’clock,
And well we may come there by dinnertime.

DUTCH:
Kom nu, mijn Kaatje’, eens naar uw vader toe,
In dit armoedig, doch welvoeg’lijk kleed ;
Met trotsche beurs, schoon need’rig van gewaad;
De geest alleen geeft aan het lijf waardij;

MORE:
Mean habiliments=Plain clothes
Proud=Full
Peereth=Peeps out, can be seen
Habit=Attire
Painted=Patterned
Furniture=Clothes
Array=Attire
Lay it on=Blame
Look what=Whatever
Still=Always
Crossing=Contradicting
Compleat:
Habiliment=Kleeding, dos, gewaad
To peer out=Uitmunten, uitsteeken
Habit=Een kleed, gewaad, dos
Furniture=Stoffeersel
Array=Gewaad, kleeding
To lay upon=Opleggen, te laste leggen
Still=Steeds, gestadig, altyd
To cross=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, dwarsboomen, wederestreeven, kruisen

Topics: fashion/trends, poverty and wealth, appearance, value, vanity

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Player King
CONTEXT:
For ’tis a question left us yet to prove,
Whether love lead fortune, or else fortune love.
The great man down, you mark his favorite flies.
The poor advanced makes friends of enemies.
And hitherto doth love on fortune tend,

DUTCH:
Het is zelfs de vraag of liefde het lot bestuurt of het lot de liefde. /
Want op de vraag wacht men nog steeds bescheid, Of liefde ‘t lot, dan ‘t lot de lief de leidt? /
Want ‘t is een open vraag, als ‘n lastge som, Of liefde leidt het lot of andersom.

MORE:
Schmidt:
To advance=To raise to a higher worth and dignity
Compleat:
To advance=Bevorderen, verhoogen voortzetten

Topics: love, fate/destiny, wealth, value

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Agamemnon
CONTEXT:
CALCHAS
You have a Trojan prisoner, called Antenor,
Yesterday took: Troy holds him very dear.
Oft have you—often have you thanks therefore—
Desired my Cressid in right great exchange,
Whom Troy hath still denied: but this Antenor,
I know, is such a wrest in their affairs
That their negotiations all must slack,
Wanting his manage; and they will almost
Give us a prince of blood, a son of Priam,
In change of him: let him be sent, great princes,
And he shall buy my daughter; and her presence
Shall quite strike off all service I have done,
In most accepted pain.
AGAMEMNON
Let Diomedes bear him,
And bring us Cressid hither: Calchas shall have
What he requests of us. Good Diomed,
Furnish you fairly for this interchange:
Withal bring word if Hector will to-morrow
Be answered in his challenge: Ajax is ready.
DIOMEDES
This shall I undertake; and ’tis a burden
Which I am proud to bear.

DUTCH:
En, Diomedes,
Zorg voor die zaak u waardig uit te rusten;
Bericht ons ook, of Hector nu op morgen
Den kamp laat doorgaan; Ajax is bereid.

MORE:

Wrest=Tuning key
Slack=Slow down, flag
Manage=Guidance
Change of=Exchange for
Accepted=Willingly endured
Furnish=Equip
Compleat:
Wrest=Strykstok
To slack=Losmaaken, ontbinden, bot geeven; (retard) Zammelen, agter blyven
Manage=De bestiering
To furnish=Verschaffen, voorzien, verzorgen, stoffeeren, toetakelen

Topics: value, business, resolution, contract

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
LUCILLIUS
Safe, Antony. Brutus is safe enough.
I dare assure thee that no enemy
Shall ever take alive the noble Brutus.
The gods defend him from so great a shame!
When you do find him, or alive or dead,
He will be found like Brutus, like himself.
ANTONY
This is not Brutus, friend, but, I assure you,
A prize no less in worth. Keep this man safe.
Give him all kindness. I had rather have
Such men my friends than enemies. Go on,
And see whether Brutus be alive or dead.
And bring us word unto Octavius’ tent
How everything is chanced.

DUTCH:
Toch geen gering’re vangst. Bewaak hem wel;
Bewijs hem enkel goedheid; want ik wensch
Een man als hij tot vriend veeleer dan vijand.

MORE:

Topics: security, friendship, value

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
Haste still pays haste, and leisure answers leisure;
Like doth quit like, and measure still for measure.

DUTCH:
Voor spoed wordt spoed vergolden, kwaad voor kwaad,
Gelijk steeds voor gelijk, en Maat voor Maat.

MORE:

Topics: law/legal, time, justice, value

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
He jests at scars that never felt a wound.

DUTCH:
Wie nooit een wonde voelde, lacht om pijn

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
U.S. v. Pastor, 557 F.2d 930, 942 (2d Cir. 1977)(Van Graafeiland, J.)( dissenting).

Topics: cited in law, courage, value, respect

PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Jeweller
CONTEXT:
JEWELLER
What, my lord! dispraise?
TIMON
A more satiety of commendations.
If I should pay you for’t as ’tis extolled,
It would unclew me quite.
JEWELLER
My lord, ’tis rated
As those which sell would give: but you well know,
Things of like value differing in the owners
Are prized by their masters: believe’t, dear lord,
You mend the jewel by the wearing it.
TIMON
Well mocked.
MERCHANT
No, my good lord; he speaks the common tongue,
Which all men speak with him.
TIMON
Look, who comes here: will you be chid?

DUTCH:
Neen, beste heer, hij zegt slechts
Wat heel de wereld zegt.

MORE:
Proverb: The worth of a thing is as it is esteemed (valued)

Dispraise=Censure
Satiety=Excess
Extolled=Praised
Unclew=Unravel, ruin (a clew was a ball of thread)
Rated=Valued
Mend=Increase the value
Chid=Reprimanded
Compleat:
Dispraise=Mispryzen, hoonen, verachten, laaken
Satiety=Zotheyd, verzaadigdheyd
To extoll=Verheffen, pryzen, looven
Clew=Een kluwen
To rate=Waardeeren, schatten, op prys stellen
Mend=Beteren, verbeteren
Chide=Kyven, bekyven

Topics: flattery, business, value, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Fool
CONTEXT:
Thou wast a pretty fellow when thou hadst no need to care for her frowning. Now thou art an O without a figure. I am better than thou art now. I am a fool. Thou art nothing.
(to GONERIL) Yes, forsooth, I will hold my tongue. So your face bids me, though you say nothing. Mum, mum,
He that keeps nor crust nor crumb,
Weary of all, shall want some.
(indicating LEAR) That’s a shelled peascod.

DUTCH:
Bedaard, bedaard;
Want wie korst noch kruim bewaart,
Treurt, dat hij niets heeft bespaard.
Die daar is een uitgedopte erwteschil.

MORE:
He that keeps nor crust nor crumb: he who foolishly gives everything away because he is tired of it will eventually need some of it back.
An O without a figure=a cipher, a zero with no other number to give it a value
Schmidt:
Shelled peascod (or pescod)=a shelled peaspod: insult, an empty peapod (een lege peulenschil), a nothing.

Topics: poverty and wealth, excess, value, caution, ruin

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
Yea, strike the Dauphin blind to look on us.
And tell the pleasant prince this mock of his
Hath turned his balls to gun-stones, and his soul
Shall stand sore chargèd for the wasteful vengeance
That shall fly with them; for many a thousand widows
Shall this his mock mock out of their dear husbands,
Mock mothers from their sons, mock castles down,
And some are yet ungotten and unborn
That shall have cause to curse the Dauphin’s scorn.
But this lies all within the will of God,
To whom I do appeal, and in whose name
Tell you the Dauphin I am coming on,
To venge me as I may and to put forth
My rightful hand in a well-hallowed cause.
So get you hence in peace. And tell the Dauphin
His jest will savour but of shallow wit
When thousands weep more than did laugh at it.
—Convey them with safe conduct.—Fare you well.

DUTCH:
Gaat thans in vrede heen, en zegt den prins,
Dat niemand meer zijn scherts een scherts zal achten,
Als duizenden dra weenen, die nu lachten. —
Bezorgt hun vrijgeleide. — Vaart gij wel!

MORE:
Balls=Tennis balls
Gunstones=Cannonballs
Hallowed=Consecrated
Rightful=Lawful, legitimate
Savour=Have a particular smell; be of a particular nature (metaphorically)

Compleat:
Hallowed=Geheiligd, gewyd
Rightfull=Rechtmaatig, gerechtig
Savour=(smell) ruiken; (taste) smaaken

Topics: revenge, intellect, value, understanding

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: King Richard III
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD
Because that, like a jack, thou keep’st the stroke
Betwixt thy begging and my meditation.
I am not in the giving vein today.
BUCKINGHAM
Why then, resolve me whether you will or no.
KING RICHARD
Thou troublest me; I am not in the vein.
BUCKINGHAM
And is it thus? Repays he my deep service
With such deep contempt? Made I him king for this?
O, let me think on Hastings and be gone
To Brecknock, while my fearful head is on!

DUTCH:
Wijl tusschen mijn gedachten en uw beed’len
Uw slag steeds komt, als van een klokkeventjen.
Ik ben in geen goedgeefsche luim vandaag.

MORE:
Jack=Figure strike the bell in old clocks
Stroke=Clock sounding the hour
Vein=Mood
Resolve me=Give me your answer/determination
Brecknock=Brecon
Compleat:
Stroke=Slag
Vein=Ader; styl
A crafty jack=Een looze boef
To resolve=Besluyten, voorneemen, een besluyt neemen, te raade worden; oplossen
Resolve me (let me know your mind)=Verklaar my uwe meening: zeg my hoe gy het hebben wilt
Resolve me this question=Los my deeze vraag eens op

Topics: order/society, merit, work, value

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Ulysses
CONTEXT:
ULYSSES
I do not strain at the position,—
It is familiar,—but at the author’s drift;
Who, in his circumstance, expressly proves
That no man is the lord of any thing,
Though in and of him there be much consisting,
Till he communicate his parts to others:
Nor doth he of himself know them for aught
Till he behold them formed in the applause
Where they’re extended; who, like an arch, reverberates
The voice again, or, like a gate of steel
Fronting the sun, receives and renders back
His figure and his heat. I was much wrapt in this;
And apprehended here immediately
The unknown Ajax.
Heavens, what a man is there! a very horse,
That has he knows not what. Nature, what things there are
Most abject in regard and dear in use!
What things again most dear in the esteem
And poor in worth! Now shall we see to-morrow—
An act that very chance doth throw upon him—
Ajax renowned. O heavens, what some men do,
While some men leave to do!
How some men creep in skittish fortune’s hall,
Whiles others play the idiots in her eyes!
How one man eats into another’s pride,
While pride is fasting in his wantonness!
To see these Grecian lords!— why, even already
They clap the lubber Ajax on the shoulder,
As if his foot were on brave Hector’s breast
And great Troy shrinking.

DUTCH:
Wat mij verbaast, is niet de stelling zelf,
Die elk wel kent, maar wel ‘t besluit des schrijvers

MORE:
Strain at=Struggle to accept
Position=Argument
Drift=Meaning, gist
Circumstance=Detail of an argument
Expressly=In full, explicitly
In and of=He and his actions
Consisting=Quality, substance
Parts=Qualities
Formed in=Reflected in
Arch=Vault
Figure=Appearance
Abject in regard=Despised
Dear in use=Useful
Dear in the esteem=Highly regarded
Poor in worth=Of little value
Lubber=Lout
Shrinking=Weakening
Compleat:
Strain hard=Alle zyne krachten inspannen; lustig zyn best doen
Position=Legging, stelling
Drift=Oogmerk, opzet, vaart
Circumstance=Omstandigheyd
Circumstanced=Met omstandigheden belegd, onder omstandigheden begreepen
Expressely or Expresly=Duidelyk; uitdrukkelyk
Consistence=Bestaanlykheid; saamenbestaanlykheid
Parts=Deelen, hoedaanigheden, begaafdheden
Form=Wyze, gedaante
Arch=Een gewelf, boog
Figure (or representation)=Afbeelding
Figure (or appearance)=Gedaante, aanzien
Abject=Veracht, gering, snood, lafhartig, verworpen
Dear=Waard, lief, dierbaar, duur
Lubber=Een sul, slokker, zwabber, een lubbert

Topics: communication, persuasion, reputation, value, appearance, merit

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
We lost a jewel of her; and our esteem
Was made much poorer by it: but your son,
As mad in folly, lacked the sense to know
Her estimation home.
COUNTESS
‘Tis past, my liege;
And I beseech your majesty to make it
Natural rebellion, done i’ the blade of youth;
When oil and fire, too strong for reason’s force,
O’erbears it and burns on.
KING
My honoured lady,
I have forgiven and forgotten all;
Though my revenges were high bent upon him,
And watched the time to shoot.

DUTCH:
Eed’le vrouw,
Vergeven heb ik alles en vergeten,
Hoe straf mijn toorn op hem gespannen waar’,
Den tijd voor ‘t schot bespiedend.

MORE:
Esteem=Worth (own worth)
Estimation=Value
Home=To the full
Make=Consider
Blade=Green shoot, callowness of youth
High bent=Bent to breaking point
Watch the time=Wait patiently
Compleat:
Esteem=Achting, waarde
Estimation=Waardering, schatting
Blade=Blad van een gewas; een Jonker
I have got the bent of his bow=Ik weet wel waar hy heen wil
Watch=Waaken, bespieden
Bent=Buiging, neiging

Topics: value, mercy, revenge, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Cominius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
Why, so: you have made good work!
A pair of tribunes that have rack’d for Rome,
To make coals cheap,—a noble memory!
COMINIUS
I minded him how royal ’twas to pardon
When it was less expected: he replied,
It was a bare petition of a state
To one whom they had punish’d.
MENENIUS
Very well: Could he say less?
COMINIUS
I offer’d to awaken his regard
For’s private friends: his answer to me was,
He could not stay to pick them in a pile
Of noisome musty chaff: he said ’twas folly,
For one poor grain or two, to leave unburnt,
And still to nose the offence.

DUTCH:
Ik stelde in ‘t licht, hoe koninklijk vergift nis
Zou wezen, onverwacht verleend; dit noemde
Hij recht armzalig smeeken van een staat
Tot een, nog onlangs door dien staat bestraft

MORE:
Rack=Stretch, strain, make huge effort
Make coals cheap=Burning Rome will make coal plentiful
A noble memory=A great way to be remembered
The less expected (the pardon), the more royal it is to give it
A bare petition=Unsubstantiated plea, without justification or excuse for the pardon
Nose the offence=Smell the offending material
Compleat:
Racked=Gerekt, gepynigd; gezuiverd
Bare=Bloot, naakt, kaal
Petition=Verzoek, smeekschrift, request

Topics: achievement, friendship, value

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Portia
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
I never did repent for doing good,
Nor shall not now; for in companions
That do converse and waste the time together
Whose souls do bear an equal yoke of love,
There must be needs a like proportion
Of lineaments, of manners, and of spirit,
Which makes me think that this Antonio,
Being the bosom lover of my lord,
Must needs be like my lord. If it be so,
How little is the cost I have bestowed
In purchasing the semblance of my soul
From out the state of hellish cruelty!
This comes too near the praising of myself.
Therefore no more of it. Hear other things.
Lorenzo, I commit into your hands
The husbandry and manage of my house
Until my lord’s return.
For mine own part,
I have toward heaven breathed a secret vow
To live in prayer and contemplation,
Only attended by Nerissa here
Until her husband and my lord’s return.
There is a monastery two miles off,
And there will we abide. I do desire you
Not to deny this imposition,
The which my love and some necessity
Now lays upon you.

DUTCH:
Nooit heeft mij nog een goede daad berouwd,
En deez’ zal ‘t ook niet doen; want trouwe makkers,
Die samen immer leven en verkeeren,
Wier zielen saam een juk van vriendschap dragen,
Gelijk verdeeld, die moeten wel gelijk zijn
In wezenstrekken, geest en wijs van doen;

MORE:
Waste=Spend
Lineaments=Features
Semblance=Similarity
Husbandry=Care, cultivation, tillage
Manage=Management
Deny=Refuse
Imposition=Charge
Compleat:
Waste=Doorbrengen
Lineament=Een trek
Semblance=Gelykenis, schyn
Husbandry=Huysbezorging
Manage=Bewind, bestiering
Imposition=Oplegging, opdringing, belasting

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
SALERIO
I would have stayed till I had made you merry
If worthier friends had not prevented me.
ANTONIO
Your worth is very dear in my regard.
I take it your own business calls on you
And you embrace th’ occasion to depart.

DUTCH:
Geloof me, heeren, ik waardeer u hoog,
Maar reken, dat uw zaken thans u roepen,
En gij nu vrijheid vindt om heen te gaan.

MORE:
Your worth is very dear…=You are very worthy (in my view)
Compleat:
Worth=Waarde
Worthy=Waardig, eerwaardig, voortreffelyk, uytmuntend, deftig
Occasion=Gelegenheyd, voorval, oorzaak
He took occasion to blame me for it=Hy nam oorzaak om my daarover te beschuldigen

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
OLIVER
And what wilt thou do—beg when that is spent? Well, sir, get you in. I will not long be troubled with you. You shall have some part of your will. I pray you leave me.
ORLANDO
I will no further offend you than becomes me for my good.
OLIVER
Get you with him, you old dog.
ADAM
Is “old dog” my reward? Most true, I have lost my teeth in your service. God be with my old master. He would not have spoke such a word.

DUTCH:
Ik zal u niet langer lastig vallen, dan in mijn belang
noodzakelijk is.

MORE:
Become=To fit, suit. (Becomes me for my good=than I consider necessary)
Offend=Displease, mortify, affront; trespass on
Compleat:
Become=Betaamen
Offend=Misdoen, ergeren, aanstoot geeven, verstoordmaaken, beledigen

Topics: insult, status, work, value, ingratitude

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Margaret
CONTEXT:
MARGARET
That for thyself: I will not so presume
To send such peevish tokens to a king.
SUFFOLK
O, wert thou for myself! But, Suffolk, stay;
Thou mayst not wander in that labyrinth;
There Minotaurs and ugly treasons lurk.
Solicit Henry with her wondrous praise:
Bethink thee on her virtues that surmount,
And natural graces that extinguish art;
Repeat their semblance often on the seas,
That, when thou comest to kneel at Henry’s feet,
Thou mayst bereave him of his wits with wonder.

DUTCH:
Houd gij dit zelf; ‘k hen niet zoo stout, een koning
Een liefdepand, zoo nietig , toe te zenden.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Presume=Dare
Peevish=Trifling
There=Where
Minotaur=Monster, half man, half bull, kept in a labyrinth
Solicit=Persuade
Surmount=Excel
Extinguish=Obscure, outshine
Bereave=Take from, deprive

Compleat:
Presume=He presumes too much: Hy vermeet zich te veel
Peevish=Kribbig, gemelyk
Minotaur=Een fabelachtig gedrocht, half man half stier
Sollicit=Aanspooren, aanzettten, beweegen
Surmount=Overtreffen, te boven gaan
Extinguish=Vermeesteren
Bereave=Berooven

Topics: value, virtue

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Charles
CONTEXT:
Tis known already that I am possess’d
With more than half the Gallian territories,
And therein reverenced for their lawful king:
Shall I, for lucre of the rest unvanquish’d,
Detract so much from that prerogative,
As to be call’d but viceroy of the whole?
No, lord ambassador, I’ll rather keep
That which I have than, coveting for more,
Be cast from possibility of all.

DUTCH:
Neen, heer gezant, neen, ik behoud veeleer
Dat wat ik heb, dan dat ik, meer begeerend,
De moog’lijkheid mij van ‘t geheel ontneem.

MORE:
Proverb: All covet all lose

Possessed with=Possess, control
Reverenced=Respected
Lucre=Gain
Cast from=Excluded from

Compleat:
To possess one’s self of a thing=Zich in het bezit van een ding stellen
To possess one’s self of a place=Bezit neemen van een plaats
To reverence=Eeren, ontzien, eer bewyzen
Lucre=Gewin, voordeel, profyt
To be cast=’t Recht verlooren hebben

Topics: envy, satisfaction, value

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
It is not the fashion to see the lady the epilogue, but
it is no more unhandsome than to see the lord the
prologue. If it be true that good wine needs no bush,
’tis true that a good play needs no epilogue. Yet to
good wine they do use good bushes, and good plays prove
the better by the help of good epilogues. What a case am
I in, then, that am neither a good epilogue nor cannot
insinuate with you in the behalf of a good play. I am
not furnished like a beggar; therefore to beg will not
become me. My way is to conjure you, and I’ll begin with
the women. I charge you, O women, for the love you bear
to men, to like as much of this play as please you. And
I charge you, O men, for the love you bear to women—as
I perceive by your simpering, none of you hates
them—that between you and the women the play may please.
If I were a woman, I would kiss as many of you as had
beards that pleased me, complexions that liked me, and
breaths that I defied not. And I am sure as many as have
good beards, or good faces, or sweet breaths will, for
my kind offer, when I make curtsy, bid me farewell.

DUTCH:
Is ‘t waar, dat goede wijn geen krans behoeft, even waar is het, dat een goed stuk geen epiloog behoeft maar waar goede wijn is, hangt men fraaie kransen uit, en goede stukken doen zich beter voor met behulp van goede epilogen.

MORE:
Proverb “Good wine needs no bush”
“A good bush” here refers to Ivy, which was hung out at vintners’ doors and in windows to advertise that the hostelry had a good wine.
Also from Sir John Harington’s Epigrams (1618)
“And with this prouerbe proued it labour lost:
Good Ale doth need no signe, good Wine no bush,
Good verse of praisers, need not passse a rush.”

Unhandsome=Unbecoming
Insinuate=To ingratiate one’s self (in a bad sense); to intermeddle
Case=Situation, plight, legal dilemma or actionable state
Furnished=Dressed
Liked=Pleased
Defied=Rejected
Compleat:
Unhandsome=Niet fraai
Insinuate=Inboezemen, inflyen, indringe, inschuyven
Case=Zaak, geval
Furnished=Verzorgd, voorzien, gestoffeerd

Topics: reputation, skill/talent, value, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
Why, then you should discover a brace of
unmeriting, proud, violent, testy magistrates, alias
fools, as any in Rome.
SICINIUS
Menenius, you are known well enough, too.
MENENIUS
I am known to be a humorous patrician, and one that
loves a cup of hot wine with not a drop of allaying
Tiber in’t; said to be something imperfect in
favouring the first complaint; hasty and tinder-like
upon too trivial motion; one that converses more
with the buttock of the night than with the forehead
of the morning: what I think I utter, and spend my
malice in my breath. Meeting two such wealsmen as
you are—I cannot call you Lycurguses—if the drink
you give me touch my palate adversely, I make a
crooked face at it. I can’t say your worships have
delivered the matter well, when I find the ass in
compound with the major part of your syllables: and
though I must be content to bear with those that say
you are reverend grave men, yet they lie deadly that
tell you you have good faces. If you see this in
the map of my microcosm, follows it that I am known
well enough too? what barm can your bisson
conspectuities glean out of this character, if I be
known well enough too?

DUTCH:
Als ik twee zulke staatslieden als gij zijt, — Lycurgussen kan ik u niet noemen, — ontmoet, en gij mij een dronk aanbiedt, die mijn gehemelte onaangenaam aandoet, dan trek ik er een scheef gezicht bij.

MORE:
Humorous=Capricious, whimsical
Converses more=Is more conversant with
Too trivial motion=Too trifling a provocation
Spend my malice in my breath=Vent my anger in words
Weal=(1) Welfare, prosperity, happiness; (2) Commonwealth, body politic
Wealsmen=Legislators
Testy=Easily angry, fretful, peevish
Motion=Incitement
Delivered=Spoken, presented
Good faces=(1) Honest faces; (2) Handsome faces
Reverend=Entitled to respect, venerable
Bisson (beesom)=Purblind
Conspectuities=Sight, vision
Glean=Conclude, infer
Map of my microcosm=Face
Compleat:
To deliver (or speak out in discourse)=Een redevoering doen
Purblind=Stikziende
The common-weal=’t Welvaaren van ‘t algemeen
A common-wealths man=Een republyks gezinde
Testy=Korzel, kribbig, gramsteurig, gemelyk
Crooked=Krom, geboogen, scheef

Topics: respect, authority, intellect, value, adversity

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Fluellen
CONTEXT:
FLUELLEN
So. In the name of Jesu Christ, speak fewer. It is the greatest admiration in the universal world when the true and aunchient prerogatifes and laws of the wars is not kept. If you would take the pains but to examine the wars of Pompey the Great, you shall find, I warrant you, that there is no tiddle toddle nor pibble babble in Pompey’s camp. I warrant you, you shall find the ceremonies of the wars and the cares of it and the forms of it and the sobriety of it and the modesty of it to be otherwise.
GOWER
Why, the enemy is loud. You hear him all night.
FLUELLEN
If the enemy is an ass and a fool and a prating coxcomb, is it meet, think you, that we should also, look you, be an ass and a fool and a prating coxcomb, in your own conscience, now?

DUTCH:
Als de vijand een ezel is en een nar en een snappende windmaker, is het choed, denkt gij, dat wij ook zouden zijn, ziet gij, een ezel en een nar en een snappende windmaker? Op uw geweten af, spreek!

MORE:
Admiration=Wonder
Prating=Prattling, chattering
Coxcomb=Fool (From fool’s cap)
Meet=Appropriate

Compleat:
Admiration=Verwondering
To prate=Praaten
Coxcomb=Een haanekam; een nar, uilskuiken
An ignorant coxcomb=Een onweetende zotskap
Meet=Dienstig

Topics: preparation, intellect, value, conflict

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Dauphin
CONTEXT:
Well, ’tis not so, my lord high constable;
But though we think it so, it is no matter:
In cases of defence ’tis best to weigh
The enemy more mighty than he seems:
So the proportions of defence are fill’d;
Which of a weak or niggardly projection
Doth, like a miser, spoil his coat with scanting
A little cloth.

DUTCH:
Men achte, wordt verdediging beraamd,
Den vijand immer sterker dan hij schijnt;
Haar vollen eisch krijgt dan de weerbaarheid,
-Die, op een zwakke en kaar’ge wijs ontworpen,
Gelijk een vrek, om luttel stofs te sparen,
Heel ‘t kleed bederft.

MORE:
Projection=To project an opponent as large or small in scale
Niggardly=Miserly

Topics: defence, caution, value

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Mortimer
CONTEXT:
In faith, he is a worthy gentleman,
Exceedingly well read and profited
In strange concealments, valiant as a lion,
And as wondrous affable, and as bountiful
As mines of India.

DUTCH:
Hij is, geloof me, een waardig edelman,
Van veel belezenheid en door-ervaren
In diepe kunsten,

MORE:
Schmidt:
Worthy=Deserving praise, excellent (implying all the shades of meaning between simple approval and the highest veneration)
Profited=proficient
Concealments=Keeping secrets
Compleat:
A worthy man (man of worth)=Een waardig man
A worthy (virtuous or principled) man=Een man van goede grondbeginzelen
Concealment=Verberging, bedekking, geheimhouding, verzwyging

Topics: value, status, order/society, learning/education

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
My honour’s at the stake; which to defeat,
I must produce my power. Here, take her hand,
Proud scornful boy, unworthy this good gift;
That dost in vile misprision shackle up
My love and her desert; that canst not dream,
We, poising us in her defective scale,
Shall weigh thee to the beam; that wilt not know,
It is in us to plant thine honour where
We please to have it grow. Check thy contempt:
Obey our will, which travails in thy good:
Believe not thy disdain, but presently
Do thine own fortunes that obedient right
Which both thy duty owes and our power claims;
Or I will throw thee from my care for ever
Into the staggers and the careless lapse
Of youth and ignorance; both my revenge and hate
Loosing upon thee, in the name of justice,
Without all terms of pity. Speak; thine answer.
BERTRAM
Pardon, my gracious lord; for I submit
My fancy to your eyes: when I consider
What great creation and what dole of honour
Flies where you bid it, I find that she, which late
Was in my nobler thoughts most base, is now
The praised of the king; who, so ennobled,
Is as ’twere born so.

DUTCH:
Gij, die en mijne gunst en haar verdienste
Minachtend boeien aanlegt, niet begrijpt,
Dat mijn gewicht, op haar te lichte schaal
Geworpen, haar den doorslag geeft, niet inziet,
Dat onze macht uw adel planten kan,
Waar wij zijn groei begeeren.

MORE:
Misprision=1) Contempt; 2) Mistake, wrong or false imprisonment
Desert=Something deserved, either a reward or punishment
Defective=Lighter end (of the scale)
To the beam=Outweigh (raising the lighter end to the crossbeam)
Dropsied=Swollen
Plant=(Figuratively)=To give rise, to create
Check=Control
Staggers=Bewilderment, giddy confusion (a horse disease)
Careless=Reckless
Fancy=Love
Compleat:
Misprision=Verwaarloozing, verzuyming, verachteloozing
Desert=Verdienste
Defective=Gebreklyk, onvolkomen
Dropsy or dropsie=Waterzucht
The staggers=De duyzeling van een paard
Careless=Zorgeloos, kommerloos, achteloos, onachtzaam

Topics: respect, ingratitude, value, authority

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Holland
CONTEXT:
BEVIS
I tell thee, Jack Cade the clothier means to dress
the commonwealth, and turn it, and set a new nap upon it.
HOLLAND
So he had need, for ’tis threadbare. Well, I say it was never merry world in England since gentlemen came up.
BEVIS
O miserable age! Virtue is not regarded in handicrafts-men.
HOLLAND
The nobility think scorn to go in leather aprons.
BEVIS
Nay, more, the king’s council are no good workmen.

DUTCH:
Dat is ook hoognoodig, want afgedragen is hij. Ik
zeg maar, met hel vroolijk leven is het uit in Engeland,
sinds de edellieden er zoo de baas zijn.

MORE:

Set a new nap=Reform, change direction (the nap of a woven fabric being the direction)
Came up=Arrived, became fashionable
Think scorn=Are contemptuous, disdainful of
King’s Council=Assembly, privy counsellors
Regarded=Valued

Compleat:
The nap of cloth=De wol of noppen van laken
To come up=Opkomen
Regard=Achting

Topics: honesty, status, order/society, skill/talent, value, fashion/trends

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Prospero
CONTEXT:
By providence divine.
Some food we had, and some fresh water, that
A noble Neapolitan, Gonzalo,
Out of his charity – who, being then appointed
Master of this design – did give us, with
Rich garments, linens, stuffs and necessaries,
Which since have steaded much; so of his gentleness,
Knowing I loved my books, he furnished me
From mine own library with volumes that
I prize above my dukedom.

DUTCH:
Ja, zijn goedheid,
Die wist, hoe ik mijn boeken minde, gaf
Uit mijne boekerij mij werken mede,
Die ‘k hooger stel dan heel mijn hertogdom

MORE:
Steaded much=Been very helpful (stood us in good stead)
Gentleness=Kindness
Compleat:
Gentleness=Zachtheid, zachtzinnigheid, leenigheid, behendigheid
The gentleness of his temper=De zachtheid van zyn temperament
To stead (do service)=Dienst doen
To be of no stead or to serve in no stead=Nergens in staat toe zyn, nergens toe deugen
Stand in good stead=Dienstelyk zyn, goeden dienst doen.

Topics: civility, learning/education, value

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Come, Pistol, utter more to me, and withal devise something to do thyself good. Boot, boot, Master Shallow. I know the young King is sick for me. Let us take any man’s horses. The laws of England are at my commandment. Blessed are they that have been my friends, and woe to my Lord Chief Justice!

DUTCH:
Laten wij paarden nemen, waar wij ze vinden; de wetten van Engeland staan mij ten bevele. Wel hun, die mijn vrienden waren, en wee den lord opperrechter!

MORE:
“Let us take any man’s horses. The laws of England are at my commandment. ” Falstaff is abusing the right of ‘purveying’ here.

Topics: caution, status, value, law/legal

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
Well, come, my Kate. We will unto your father’s
Even in these honest mean habiliments.
Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor,
For ’tis the mind that makes the body rich,
And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds,
So honour peereth in the meanest habit.
What, is the jay more precious than the lark
Because his feathers are more beautiful?
Or is the adder better than the eel
Because his painted skin contents the eye?
Oh, no, good Kate. Neither art thou the worse
For this poor furniture and mean array.
If thou account’st it shame, lay it on me,
And therefore frolic! We will hence forthwith
To feast and sport us at thy father’s house.
Go, call my men, and let us straight to him,
And bring our horses unto Long Lane end.
There will we mount, and thither walk on foot.
Let’s see, I think ’tis now some seven o’clock,
And well we may come there by dinnertime.
KATHERINE
I dare assure you, sir, ’tis almost two,
And ’twill be supper time ere you come there.
PETRUCHIO
It shall be seven ere I go to horse.
Look what I speak, or do, or think to do,
You are still crossing it. Sirs, let ’t alone.
I will not go today, and ere I do
It shall be what o’clock I say it is.

DUTCH:
Wie schat den meerkol hooger dan den leeuwrik,
Omdat zijn veed’ren fraaier zijn van kleur?

MORE:
Mean habiliments=Plain clothes
Proud=Full
Peereth=Peeps out, can be seen
Habit=Attire
Painted=Patterned
Furniture=Clothes
Array=Attire
Lay it on=Blame
Look what=Whatever
Still=Always
Crossing=Contradicting
Compleat:
Habiliment=Kleeding, dos, gewaad
To peer out=Uitmunten, uitsteeken
Habit=Een kleed, gewaad, dos
Furniture=Stoffeersel
Array=Gewaad, kleeding
To lay upon=Opleggen, te laste leggen
Still=Steeds, gestadig, altyd
To cross=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, dwarsboomen, wederestreeven, kruisen

Topics: fashion/trends, poverty and wealth, appearance, value, vanity

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
JAQUES
Nay then, God be wi’ you, an you talk in blank verse.
ROSALIND
Farewell, Monsieur Traveler. Look you lisp and wear
strange suits, disable all the benefits of your own
country, be out of love with your nativity, and almost
chide God for making you that countenance you are, or I
will scarce think you have swam in a gondola.
Why, how now,
Orlando, where have you been all this while? You a
lover? An you serve me such another trick, never come in
my sight more.

DUTCH:
Vaarwel, signore Reiziger. Zorg vooral, dat gij lispelt en u uitheemsch kleedt, al wat er goed is in uw eigen land nietswaardig noemt, met het uur van uw geboorte overhoop ligt en bijna tegen den lieven God uitvaart, omdat hij u geen ander gezicht gegeven heeft;

MORE:
Disable=To disparage, to undervalue
Countenance=Face, air
Compleat:
Disable=Onmagtig maaken, onvermogend maaken
Countenance=Gelaat, gezigt, uitzigt, weezen

Topics: language, appearance, value, ingratitude

PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: First Stranger
CONTEXT:
FIRST STRANGER
For mine own part,
I never tasted Timon in my life,
Nor came any of his bounties over me,
To mark me for his friend; yet, I protest,
For his right noble mind, illustrious virtue
And honourable carriage,
Had his necessity made use of me,
I would have put my wealth into donation,
And the best half should have returned to him,
So much I love his heart: but, I perceive,
Men must learn now with pity to dispense;
For policy sits above conscience.

DUTCH:
Doch dit ervaar ik:
Meêdoogen, o! die zwakheid zij vergeten,
Want slimheid zetelt hooger dan ‘t geweten.

MORE:
Tasted=Received anything from
Bounties=Gifts
Protest=Declare, attest
Carriage=Conduct
Policy=Prudence, management
Sits above=Prevails over
Compleat:
Tasted=Geproefd
Bounty=Goedertierenheid, mildheid
Protest=Betuigen, aantuigen, aankondigen
Carriage=Gedrag, aanstelling, ommegang, handel en wandel
Policy=Behendigheid

Topics: money, poverty and wealth, value, conscience

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: John Talbot
CONTEXT:
TALBOT
Fly, to revenge my death, if I be slain.
JOHN TALBOT
He that flies so will ne’er return again.
TALBOT
If we both stay, we both are sure to die.
JOHN TALBOT
Then let me stay; and, father, do you fly:
Your loss is great, so your regard should be;
My worth unknown, no loss is known in me.
Upon my death the French can little boast;
In yours they will, in you all hopes are lost.
Flight cannot stain the honour you have won;
But mine it will, that no exploit have done:
You fled for vantage, everyone will swear;
But, if I bow, they’ll say it was for fear.
There is no hope that ever I will stay,
If the first hour I shrink and run away.
Here on my knee I beg mortality,
Rather than life preserved with infamy.

DUTCH:
Mijn waarde is onbekend; mij mist men niet.
Bij mijn val stoft geen Franschman schel en luid,

MORE:

Your loss is great=Losing you would be a great loss
Regard=Self-regard, interest
Worth=Value, valuable quality
My worth unknown=An unknown quantity
No loss in known in me=My loss would not be felt
Vantage=(Military) advantage
Bow=Retreat, give way
Infamy=Disgrace

Compleat:
Regard=Opzigt, inzigt, omzigtigheyd, zorg, acht, achting
Worth=Waarde, waardy
Vantage=Toegift, toemaat, overmaat, overwigt
Bow=Buigen, buken
Infamy=Eerloosheid, schandvlek

Topics: value, respect

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Helen
CONTEXT:
TROILUS
Fie, fie, my brother!
Weigh you the worth and honour of a king
So great as our dread father in a scale
Of common ounces? will you with counters sum
The past proportion of his infinite?
And buckle in a waist most fathomless
With spans and inches so diminutive
As fears and reasons? fie, for godly shame!
HELENUS
No marvel, though you bite so sharp at reasons,
You are so empty of them. Should not our father
Bear the great sway of his affairs with reasons,
Because your speech hath none that tells him so?
TROILUS
You are for dreams and slumbers, brother priest;
You fur your gloves with reason. Here are
your reasons:
You know an enemy intends you harm;
You know a sword employed is perilous,
And reason flies the object of all harm:
Who marvels then, when Helenus beholds
A Grecian and his sword, if he do set
The very wings of reason to his heels
And fly like chidden Mercury from Jove,
Or like a star disorbed? Nay, if we talk of reason,
Let’s shut our gates and sleep: manhood and honour
Should have hare-hearts, would they but fat their thoughts
With this crammed reason: reason and respect
Make livers pale and lustihood deject.

DUTCH:
Geen wonder, dat ge op gronden bijtend schimpt,
Gij, zelf zoo arm er aan. Moet onze vader
Zijn heerschersambt vervullen zonder gronden,
Wijl gij, die dit van hem begeert, ze mist?

MORE:
Counters=Blank coins
Past proportion-Measureless
Fathomless=Unmeasureable
Span=Hand span
Bite=Inveigle
Sway=Direction
Fur your gloves=Comfort yourself
Reasons=Rationalisations
Flies=Flees
Hare=Flighty, ready to run
Crammed=Force fed
Lustihood=Energy
Compleat:
Counter=Legpenning, rekenpenningen
To bite=Byten, knaagen, snerpen, steeken, voor de gek houden
To sway=(govern) Regeeren. To sway with one=Gezach over iemand hebben
To furr=Met bont voeren
To hare=Verbaasd maaken, ontstellen
To cram with meat=Met spyze opkroppen, overlaaden

Burgersdijk notes:
Gij voert met gronden uwe handschoen. Met verstand, met omzichtigheid. Gij schroomt het harde
gevest van het zwaard aan te vatten.

Topics: value, respect, reason, status, dispute

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion,
By means whereof this breast of mine hath buried
Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations.
Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face?
BRUTUS
No, Cassius, for the eye sees not itself
But by reflection, by some other things.
CASSIUS
‘Tis just.
And it is very much lamented, Brutus,
That you have no such mirrors as will turn
Your hidden worthiness into your eye
That you might see your shadow . I have heard
Where many of the best respect in Rome,
Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus
And groaning underneath this age’s yoke,
Have wished that noble Brutus had his eyes.

DUTCH:
Neen, Cassius; ‘t oog ontwaart zichzelve niet,
Niet dan teruggekaatst, door and’re dingen

MORE:
Proverb: The eye sees not itself but by reflection
Also registered in the Oxford Dictionary of English Proverbs: “How wel or ill I haue done in it, I am ignorant: (the eye that sees round about it selfe, sees not into it selfe).”
Cassius replies later:
“And since you know you cannot see yourself
So well as by reflection, I, your glass,
Will modestly discover to yourself
That of yourself which you yet know not of.”

Buried=Concealed
Worthy=Important
Cogitations=Thoughts
Just=True
Turn=Reflect
Shadow=Reflection, form
Respect=Reputation
Had his eyes=Could see clearly
Compleat:
Buried=Begraven, bedelven
Worthy=Waardig, eerwaardig, voortreffelyk, uytmuntend, deftig
Cogitation=Een gedacht, overdenking
Just (righteous)=Een rechtvaardige
Just=Effen, juist, net
Shadow=Een schaduw, schim

Topics: understanding, error, wisdom, value

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
Nor need’st thou much importune me to that
Whereon this month I have been hammering.
I have considered well his loss of time
And how he cannot be a perfect man,
Not being tried and tutored in the world:
Experience is by industry achieved
And perfected by the swift course of time.
Then tell me, whither were I best to send him?
PANTHINO
I think your lordship is not ignorant
How his companion, youthful Valentine,
Attends the emperor in his royal court.

DUTCH:
Gij hebt geen sterken aandrang noodig, ‘t was
De gansche maand reeds niet uit mijn gedachten;
Ik overwoog reeds lang zijn tijdsverlies,
En hoe hij nooit een deeg’lijk man wordt, als
De wereld hem niet schudt en mondig maakt;

MORE:
Hammering=Pondering
Industry=Assiduity, zealous activity
Importune=Urge, impel
Compleat:
To hammer out a thing=Iets met groote moeite bewerken
Importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen
Industry=Nyverheid, vytigheid, kloekzinnigheid, vernuftigheid
Industry (wit)=Behendigheid
To tutor=Berispen, bestraffen

Topics: time, age/experience, work, value, learning/education

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
Give me the crown. Here, cousin, seize the crown;
Here cousin:
On this side my hand, and on that side yours.
Now is this golden crown like a deep well
That owes two buckets, filling one another,
The emptier ever dancing in the air,
The other down, unseen and full of water:
That bucket down and full of tears am I,
Drinking my griefs, whilst you mount up on high.

DUTCH:
Nu is de goudhand als een diepe put,
Een met twee emmers, die elkander vullen;
De ledige altijd dansend in de lucht,
De tweede omlaag en ongezien, vol water;
Ik hen die eene omlaag, vol, uit het oog,
Ik drink mijn kommer en hef u omhoog.

MORE:

Proverb: Like two buckets of a well, if one go up the other must go down

Topics: proverbs and idioms, judgment, equality, achievement, value

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
DESDEMONA
What wouldst write of me, if thou shouldst praise me?
IAGO
O gentle lady, do not put me to ’t,
For I am nothing, if not critical.
DESDEMONA
Come on, assay. There’s one gone to the harbour?
IAGO
Ay, madam
DESDEMONA
I am not merry, but I do beguile
The thing I am by seeming otherwise.
Come, how wouldst thou praise me?

DUTCH:
Wat schreeft gij wel van mij, om mij te loven?

MORE:
Put (me) to it=Compel, oblige, force, push
Assay=Try, make an attempt
Beguile=Deceive
Compleat:
To assay=Trachten
Beguile=Bedriegen, om den tuin leiden

Topics: temptation, honesty, truth, value

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
Why, then you should discover a brace of
unmeriting, proud, violent, testy magistrates, alias
fools, as any in Rome.
SICINIUS
Menenius, you are known well enough, too.
MENENIUS
I am known to be a humorous patrician, and one that
loves a cup of hot wine with not a drop of allaying
Tiber in’t; said to be something imperfect in
favouring the first complaint; hasty and tinder-like
upon too trivial motion; one that converses more
with the buttock of the night than with the forehead
of the morning: what I think I utter, and spend my
malice in my breath. Meeting two such wealsmen as
you are—I cannot call you Lycurguses—if the drink
you give me touch my palate adversely, I make a
crooked face at it. I can’t say your worships have
delivered the matter well, when I find the ass in
compound with the major part of your syllables: and
though I must be content to bear with those that say
you are reverend grave men, yet they lie deadly that
tell you you have good faces. If you see this in
the map of my microcosm, follows it that I am known
well enough too? what barm can your bisson
conspectuities glean out of this character, if I be
known well enough too?

DUTCH:
[M]en geeft mij na, dat
ik wel wat het zwak heb den eersten klager te veel gelijk
te geven, wat driftig ben en tonderachtig bij een al
te geringe aanleiding, meer met het achterdeel van de
nacht, dan met het voorhoofd van den morgen vertrouwd
ben.

MORE:
Humorous=Capricious, whimsical
Converses more=Is more conversant with
Too trivial motion=Too trifling a provocation
Spend my malice in my breath=Vent my anger in words
Weal=(1) Welfare, prosperity, happiness; (2) Commonwealth, body politic
Wealsmen=Legislators
Testy=Easily angry, fretful, peevish
Motion=Incitement
Delivered=Spoken, presented
Good faces=(1) Honest faces; (2) Handsome faces
Reverend=Entitled to respect, venerable
Bisson (beesom)=Purblind
Conspectuities=Sight, vision
Glean=Conclude, infer
Map of my microcosm=Face
Compleat:
To deliver (or speak out in discourse)=Een redevoering doen
Purblind=Stikziende
The common-weal=’t Welvaaren van ‘t algemeen
A common-wealths man=Een republyks gezinde
Testy=Korzel, kribbig, gramsteurig, gemelyk
Crooked=Krom, geboogen, scheef

Topics: respect, authority, intellect, value, adversity

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Archbishop
CONTEXT:
They that, when Richard lived, would have him die
Are now become enamored on his grave.
Thou, that threw’st dust upon his goodly head
When through proud London he came sighing on
After th’ admired heels of Bolingbroke,
Criest now “O earth, yield us that King again,
And take thou this!” O thoughts of men accursed!
Past and to come seems best; things present, worst.

DUTCH:
Booze vloek, dat wij ‘t verleden
En ‘t morgen prijzen, ‘t heden staag vertreden!

MORE:

Accursed=Cursed, doomed to misery and destruction
Heels=Applied to persons attended or pursued by others

Topics: hope/optimism, ingratitude, value

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
This I must say,
But first I beg my pardon, the young lord
Did to his majesty, his mother and his lady
Offence of mighty note; but to himself
The greatest wrong of all. He lost a wife
Whose beauty did astonish the survey
Of richest eyes, whose words all ears took captive,
Whose dear perfection hearts that scorn’d to serve
Humbly call’d mistress.
LAFEW
Praising what is lost
Makes the remembrance dear. Well, call him hither;
We are reconciled, and the first view shall kill
All repetition: let him not ask our pardon;
The nature of his great offence is dead,
And deeper than oblivion we do bury
The incensing relics of it: let him approach,
A stranger, no offender; and inform him
So ’tis our will he should.

DUTCH:
Lofprijzingen van het verleden laten ons verdrinken in dierbare herinneringen./
‘t Verloor’ne hoog te roemen, Maakt ons ‘t herdenken dierbaar.

MORE:
Proverb: Praising what is lost makes the remembrance dear

‘The first view shall kill all repetition’=after the first meeting the past will be forgotten
Incensing relics=Relics that “receive a perfuming with or offering of incense” (OED)
Compleat:
Praising=Pryzing
Remembrance=Gedachtenis, geheugenis

Topics: value, mercy, friendship, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
CASSIO
Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my
reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial. My reputation, Iago, my reputation!
IAGO
As I am an honest man, I thought you had received some
bodily wound. There is more sense in that than in
reputation. Reputation is an idle and most false
imposition, oft got without merit and lost without
deserving. You have lost no reputation at all unless you
repute yourself such a loser. What, man, there are ways
to recover the general again. You are but now cast in
his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice,
even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to
affright an imperious lion. Sue to him again and he’s
yours.

DUTCH:
Een goede naam is een ijdele en hoogst bedriegelijke
begoocheling, vaak zonder verdienste verkregen
en onverdiend verloren; gij hebt in het geheel geen goeden
naam verloren, tenzij gij uzelven den naam bezorgt,
dat gij dit verlies hebt geleden

MORE:
Proverb: A man is weal or woe as he thinks himself so

Cast=Dismissed
Mood=Anger
In policy=Public demonstration
Speak parrot=Nonsense
Fustian=Bombastic, high-sounding nonsense
Imposition=Cheat, imposture
Repute (yourself)=To think, to account, to hold
Compleat:
To cast off=Afwerpen, verwerpen, achterlaaten
To cast his adversary at the bar=Zyn party in rechte verwinnen
To be cast=’t Recht verlooren hebben
Mood=Luym, aardt, wyze
Fustian (or bombast)-Gezwets, snorkery
Fustian language=Grootspreeking, opsnyery
Imposition=Oplegging, opdringing, belasting, bedrog
Repute=Achten

Topics: reputation, merit, honesty, value, integrity, wellbeing

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
CASSIO
Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my
reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial. My reputation, Iago, my reputation!
IAGO
As I am an honest man, I thought you had received some
bodily wound. There is more sense in that than in
reputation. Reputation is an idle and most false
imposition, oft got without merit and lost without
deserving. You have lost no reputation at all unless you
repute yourself such a loser. What, man, there are ways
to recover the general again. You are but now cast in
his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice,
even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to
affright an imperious lion. Sue to him again and he’s
yours.

DUTCH:
Mijn goede naam, mijn goede naam, niijn goede naam!
0 ik heb mijn goeden naam verloren! Ik heb mijn onsterflijk
deel verloren, en wat mij rest is dierlijk! — Mijn
goeden naam, Jago, mijn goeden naam!

MORE:
Proverb: A man is weal or woe as he thinks himself so

Cast=Dismissed
Mood=Anger
In policy=Public demonstration
Speak parrot=Nonsense
Fustian=Bombastic, high-sounding nonsense
Imposition=Cheat, imposture
Repute (yourself)=To think, to account, to hold
Compleat:
To cast off=Afwerpen, verwerpen, achterlaaten
To cast his adversary at the bar=Zyn party in rechte verwinnen
To be cast=’t Recht verlooren hebben
Mood=Luym, aardt, wyze
Fustian (or bombast)-Gezwets, snorkery
Fustian language=Grootspreeking, opsnyery
Imposition=Oplegging, opdringing, belasting, bedrog
Repute=Achten

Topics: reputation, merit, honesty, value, integrity, wellbeing, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Ophelia
CONTEXT:
My honoured lord, you know right well you did,
And with them, words of so sweet breath composed
As made the things more rich. Their perfume lost,
Take these again, for to the noble mind
Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.

DUTCH:
Overvloedige gaven worden armzalig als gevers liefdeloos blijken. /
Neem ze terug : voor hem, die edel denkt, Is ‘t rijkste poover, als een nurk het schenkt. /
Want voor hen die edel denken, Wordt arm het rijkst geschenk, als hartloos zijn die ‘t schenken.

MORE:
The phrase “Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind” was coined by Shakespeare and is still in use today.

Topics: appearance, honesty, value, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
DUKE SENIOR
I like him very well.
TOUCHSTONE
God ‘ild you, sir. I desire you of the like. I press in
here, sir, amongst the rest of the country copulatives,
to swear and to forswear, according as marriage binds
and blood breaks. A poor virgin, sir, an ill-favoured
thing, sir, but mine own. A poor humor of mine, sir, to
take that that no man else will. Rich honesty dwells
like a miser, sir, in a poor house, as your pearl in
your foul oyster.
DUKE SENIOR
By my faith, he is very swift and sententious.
TOUCHSTONE
According to the fool’s bolt, sir, and such dulcet
diseases.

DUTCH:
[E]en arm maagdeken, heer, een leelijk schepseltjen, heer, maar van mij.

MORE:
Proverb: A fool’s bolt is soon shot (c. 1225)

God yield you=God bless you
Copulatives=Marrying couples
Swear=Take an oath (of innocence)
Forswear=Break one’s oath
Compleat:
Copulative=Samenvoegend
To swear=Zweeren, beëedigen
To forswear a thing=Zweeren dat iets zo niet is

Burgersdijk notes:
Naar den aard van de stompscherpe narrepijlen. According to the fool’s bolt. Een bolt was van een ronden knobbel aan het eind voorzien. Het antwoord van den nar ziet op het compliment van den hertog: he is very quick; „hij is zeer vlug, zeer gevat.” Men mag er het spreekwoord: A fool’s bolt is soon shot, K. Hendrik V , III. 7. 132 , mee in verband brengen.

Topics: still in use, proverbs and idioms, value, poverty and wealth

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Exeter
CONTEXT:
Scorn and defiance, slight regard, contempt,
And anything that may not misbecome
The mighty sender, doth he prize you at.
Thus says my king: an if your father’s Highness
Do not, in grant of all demands at large,
Sweeten the bitter mock you sent his Majesty,
He’ll call you to so hot an answer of it
That caves and womby vaultages of France
Shall chide your trespass and return your mock
In second accent of his ordinance.

DUTCH:
Uittarting en verachting, hoon en spot,
En alles, wat den grooten zender niet
Onteeren kan.

MORE:

Slight regard=Scant regard, disregard
Misbecome=To suit ill, not to befit, to be unseemly in
In grant of=The act of granting or bestowing, concession, permission
Mock=Ridicule, derision, sneer
Womby=Hollow, capacious
Vaultage=Cavern
Answer=Reply to a charge
Accent=Sound of voice
Second accent=Echo
Ordinance=Artillery

Compleat:
Misbecome=Misstaan, niet wel voegen
It misbecomes him=Het misstaat hem

Topics: status, order/society, value, insult

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
And why, I pray you? Who might be your mother,
That you insult, exult, and all at once,
Over the wretched? What though you have no beauty—
As, by my faith, I see no more in you
Than without candle may go dark to bed—
Must you be therefore proud and pitiless?
Why, what means this? Why do you look on me?
I see no more in you than in the ordinary
Of nature’s sale-work.— ‘Od’s my little life,
I think she means to tangle my eyes, too.
—No, faith, proud mistress, hope not after it.
‘Tis not your inky brows, your black silk hair,
Your bugle eyeballs, nor your cheek of cream
That can entame my spirits to your worship.
—You foolish shepherd, wherefore do you follow her,
Like foggy south puffing with wind and rain?
You are a thousand times a properer man
Than she a woman. ‘Tis such fools as you
That makes the world full of ill-favoured children.
‘Tis not her glass but you that flatters her,
And out of you she sees herself more proper
Than any of her lineaments can show her.
—But, mistress, know yourself. Down on your knees
And thank heaven, fasting, for a good man’s love,
For I must tell you friendly in your ear,
Sell when you can; you are not for all markets.
Cry the man mercy, love him, take his offer.
Foul is most foul, being foul to be a scoffer.
—So take her to thee, shepherd. Fare you well.

DUTCH:
Want hoor, wat ik als vriend in ‘t oor u zeg,
Sla toe bij ‘t bod; uw waar is niet gewild.
Snel, vraag vergiff’nis, ras zijn min gekroond!
Wie leelijk is, is ‘t leelijkst, als zij hoont.

MORE:
All at once=In one breath
Ordinary=Ordinary run
Sale-work=Ready made retail goods (of inferior quality)
Bugle=Beads, usually black
Wind and rain=Sighs and tears
Properer=More handsome
Tangle=Ensnare
Cry mercy=Take mercy on
Scoffer=Mocker. Scoffer was used for political and religious abuse.
Compleat:
At once=Op een reis, teffens, te gelyk, ten eersten
Ordinary=Gewoonlyk, gemeen
To scoff=Spotten, schimpen. To scoff at=Bespotten beschimpen.
Buggle=Een glaze kraal
Proper=Bequaam, van een bequaame lengte
To tangle=Verwarren
Mercy=Barmhartifheid, genade
To cry mercy=Om genade roepen

Topics: insult, marriage, value, ingratitude

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Lavatch
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
Wilt thou needs be a beggar?
CLOWN
I do beg your good will in this case.
COUNTESS
In what case?
CLOWN
In Isbel’s case and mine own. Service is no
heritage: and I think I shall never have the
blessing of God till I have issue o’ my body; for
they say barnes are blessings.
COUNTESS
Tell me thy reason why thou wilt marry.
CLOWN
My poor body, madam, requires it: I am driven on
by the flesh; and he must needs go that the devil
drives.

DUTCH:
In Bella’s en mijn eigen zaak. Dienst is geen erfdeel, en ik geloof, dat ik Gods zegen nimmer bezitten zal, voor ik telgen mijns lichaams rijk ben; want het zeggen is, kinderen zijn een zegen .

MORE:
Proverb: Service is no inheritance

Barnes (bairns)=Children
Service=Place and office of a servant
Compleat:
Service=Dienstbaarheid
Service is no inheritance=Den dienst is geen erfgoed
Barn (or bearn)=Een kind

Topics: work, order/society, poverty and wealth, value, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
You may wear her in title yours, but you
Know strange fowl light upon neighbouring ponds.
Your ring may be stolen too. So your brace of unprizable
Estimations, the one is but frail and the other casual.
A cunning thief or a that way accomplished courtier
Would hazard the winning both of first and last.

DUTCH:
Ook uw ring kan u gestolen worden;
en zoo is van uwe twee onwaardeerbare schatten de een
slechts zwak, de ander verliesbaar; een geslepen dief of
een in dit opzicht uitgeleerd hoveling kunnen het wagen
u zoowel den een’ als den anderen te ontfutselen.


Schmidt:
In title=As in title to an estate
So=In such a manner, thus
Unprizable=Invaluable, inestimable
Casual=Accidental, by chance
Frail=Weak, in a physical as well as moral sense
Hazard=To venture, to risk, take a bet on

Compleat:
Title=Recht, eisch
He has no good title to it=Hy heeft geen goed recht daar toe
Title=Papieren, geschriften om zyn recht to bewyzen
Hazard=Waagen, aventuuren, in de waagschaal stellen
Casual=Gevallig, toevallig
Frail=Bros

Topics: loyalty, betrayal, value, risk

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
CORIOLANUS
(…) My wife comes foremost; then the honour’d mould
Wherein this trunk was framed, and in her hand
The grandchild to her blood. But, out, affection!
All bond and privilege of nature, break!
Let it be virtuous to be obstinate.
What is that curt’sy worth? or those doves’ eyes,
Which can make gods forsworn? I melt, and am not
Of stronger earth than others. My mother bows;
As if Olympus to a molehill should
In supplication nod: and my young boy
Hath an aspect of intercession, which
Great nature cries ‘Deny not.’ let the Volsces
Plough Rome and harrow Italy: I’ll never
Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand,
As if a man were author of himself
And knew no other kin.
VIRGILIA
My lord and husband!

DUTCH:
Nimmer drijft
Natuurdrift mij, als waar’ ‘k een jonge gans;
‘k Houd stand, alsof een man zichzelven schiep,
Van geen verwanten wist.

MORE:
Mould=Model
Forsworn=Break a promise
Aspect of intercession=Pleading look
Compleat:
Mould=Form
To forswear one’s self=Eenen valschen eed doen, meyneedig zyn
To forswear a thing=Zweeren dat iets zo niet is
Forsworn=Meyneedig
Aspect=Gezigt, gelaat, aanschouw
Intercession=Tusschenspraak, bemiddeling, voorbidding

Topics: custom, nature, value, free will

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHARINE
No, my lord,
You know no more than others; but you frame
Things that are known alike; which are not wholesome
To those which would not know them, and yet must
Perforce be their acquaintance. These exactions,
Whereof my sovereign would have note, they are
Most pestilent to the bearing; and, to bear ’em,
The back is sacrifice to the load. They say
They are devised by you; or else you suffer
Too hard an exclamation.
KING HENRY VIII
Still exaction!
The nature of it? in what kind, let’s know,
Is this exaction?

DUTCH:
Steeds lasten! zware lasten!
De vorm er van? van wat natuur, laat hooren,
Zijn deze lasten?

MORE:
Proverb: To break one’s back
Frame=Devise, shape
Exactions=Extortion of tax, compulsion to pay
Pestilent=Pernicious, harmful
Sacrifice=Broken by
Compleat:
To frame=Een gestalte geeven, ontwerpen, schikken, beraamen
To exact=Afeysschen, afvorderen
Pestilent=Pestig, pestachtig, besmettelijk
To sacrifice=Offeren, opofferen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, work, value

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
O God, O God! that e’er this tongue of mine,
That laid the sentence of dread banishment
On yon proud man, should take it off again
With words of sooth! O that I were as great
As is my grief, or lesser than my name!
Or that I could forget what I have been,
Or not remember what I must be now!
Swell’st thou, proud heart? I’ll give thee scope to beat,
Since foes have scope to beat both thee and me.

DUTCH:
O, ware ik zoo groot
Als nu mijn smart, of kleiner dan mijn naam;
Of dat ik kon vergeten, wat ik was,
Of niet begrijpen, wat ik nu moet zijn!

MORE:

Words of sooth=Words of appeasement, comfort (‘sooth’ is sweet as well as true as in the verb ‘to soothe’)
Scope=(a) latitude’ (b) purpose, capabillity

Compleat:
Sooth=Zeker, voorwaar
To sooth up=Vleijen, flikflooijen
To sooth up (lull)=Aanmoedigen
Scope=Oogmerk, ,doelwit
To have free scope (latitude)=De ruimte hebben (vrye loop)

Topics: judgment, punishment, memory, integrity, value

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Ulysses
CONTEXT:
ULYSSES
I do not strain at the position,—
It is familiar,—but at the author’s drift;
Who, in his circumstance, expressly proves
That no man is the lord of any thing,
Though in and of him there be much consisting,
Till he communicate his parts to others:
Nor doth he of himself know them for aught
Till he behold them formed in the applause
Where they’re extended; who, like an arch, reverberates
The voice again, or, like a gate of steel
Fronting the sun, receives and renders back
His figure and his heat. I was much wrapt in this;
And apprehended here immediately
The unknown Ajax.
Heavens, what a man is there! a very horse,
That has he knows not what. Nature, what things there are
Most abject in regard and dear in use!
What things again most dear in the esteem
And poor in worth! Now shall we see to-morrow—
An act that very chance doth throw upon him—
Ajax renowned. O heavens, what some men do,
While some men leave to do!
How some men creep in skittish fortune’s hall,
Whiles others play the idiots in her eyes!
How one man eats into another’s pride,
While pride is fasting in his wantonness!
To see these Grecian lords!— why, even already
They clap the lubber Ajax on the shoulder,
As if his foot were on brave Hector’s breast
And great Troy shrieking.

DUTCH:
Die, dit ontwikk’lend, hier uitdrukk’lijk leert,
Dat niemand heer en meester is van iets, —
Hoe veel hij ook bezitte en in zich hebbe, —
Eer hij zijn gaven and’ren mededeelt;

MORE:
Strain at=Struggle to accept
Position=Argument
Drift=Meaning, gist
Circumstance=Detail of an argument
Expressly=In full, explicitly
In and of=He and his actions
Consisting=Quality, substance
Parts=Qualities
Formed in=Reflected in
Arch=Vault
Figure=Appearance
Abject in regard=Despised
Dear in use=Useful
Dear in the esteem=Highly regarded
Poor in worth=Of little value
Lubber=Lout
Shrinking=Weakening
Compleat:
Strain hard=Alle zyne krachten inspannen; lustig zyn best doen
Position=Legging, stelling
Drift=Oogmerk, opzet, vaart
Circumstance=Omstandigheyd
Circumstanced=Met omstandigheden belegd, onder omstandigheden begreepen
Expressely or Expresly=Duidelyk; uitdrukkelyk
Consistence=Bestaanlykheid; saamenbestaanlykheid
Parts=Deelen, hoedaanigheden, begaafdheden
Form=Wyze, gedaante
Arch=Een gewelf, boog
Figure (or representation)=Afbeelding
Figure (or appearance)=Gedaante, aanzien
Abject=Veracht, gering, snood, lafhartig, verworpen
Dear=Waard, lief, dierbaar, duur
Lubber=Een sul, slokker, zwabber, een lubbert

Topics: communication, persuasion, reputation, value, appearance, merit

PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Timon
CONTEXT:
TIMON
Rogue, rogue, rogue!
I am sick of this false world, and will love nought
But even the mere necessities upon ‘t.
Then, Timon, presently prepare thy grave;
Lie where the light foam the sea may beat
Thy grave-stone daily: make thine epitaph,
That death in me at others’ lives may laugh.
O thou sweet king-killer, and dear divorce
‘Twixt natural son and sire! thou bright defiler
Of Hymen’s purest bed! thou valiant Mars!
Thou ever young, fresh, loved and delicate wooer,
Whose blush doth thaw the consecrated snow
That lies on Dian’s lap! thou visible god,
That solder’st close impossibilities,
And makest them kiss! that speak’st with
every tongue,
To every purpose! O thou touch of hearts!
Think, thy slave man rebels, and by thy virtue
Set them into confounding odds, that beasts
May have the world in empire!

DUTCH:
Gij, die onmooglijkheden samenwelt,
Ten kus vereent! die spreekt met ied’re tong,
Tot ieder doel! gij toetssteen van de harten!

MORE:
Even the mere=The most basic
Solder=Fuse
Impossibilities=Things that cannot be joined
With every tongue=In every language
Touch of hearts=Touchstone; wounder of hearts
Compleat:
To solder=Soudeeren
The gift of tongues=De gaave der taale
To speak several tongues=Verscheiden taalen spreeken

Topics: value, truth, language, communication, leadership

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
It grieves many:
The gentleman is learn’d, and a most rare speaker;
To nature none more bound; his training such,
That he may furnish and instruct great teachers,
And never seek for aid out of himself. Yet see,
When these so noble benefits shall prove
Not well disposed, the mind growing once corrupt,
They turn to vicious forms, ten times more ugly
Than ever they were fair. This man so complete,
Who was enroll’d ‘mongst wonders, and when we,
Almost with ravish’d listening, could not find
His hour of speech a minute; he, my lady,
Hath into monstrous habits put the graces
That once were his, and is become as black
As if besmear’d in hell. Sit by us; you shall hear—
This was his gentleman in trust—of him
Things to strike honour sad. Bid him recount
The fore-recited practices; whereof
We cannot feel too little, hear too much.

DUTCH:
Velen smart het;
Hij is geleerd en een voortreff lijk reed’naar,
Groot gunst’ling van natuur, zoo opgevoed,
Dat hij zelfs groote leeraars op kon leiden
Uit zich, met niemands hulp

MORE:
Rare=Extraordinary, excellent
Benefits=Qualities
Disposed=Applied
Enrolled=Recorded
Habits=Behaviour
Grace=Good qualities
Practice=Artifice, stratagem, insidious device
Compleat:
Dispose=Beschikken, schikken
Enroll=In ‘t Stads boek aanteykenen
Habit=Heblykheyd, gewoonte, gesteltenis
Grace=Genade, gunst, fraajigheid
Practice=(underhand dealing, intrigue, plot) Praktyk, bedekten handel, list

Topics: intellect, learning/education, value, reputation

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong?
You have among you many a purchased slave,
Which—like your asses and your dogs and mules—
You use in abject and in slavish parts
Because you bought them. Shall I say to you,
“Let them be free! Marry them to your heirs!
Why sweat they under burdens? Let their beds
Be made as soft as yours and let their palates
Be seasoned with such viands”? You will answer,
“The slaves are ours.” So do I answer you.
The pound of flesh which I demand of him
Is dearly bought. ‘Tis mine and I will have it.
If you deny me, fie upon your law—
There is no force in the decrees of Venice.

DUTCH:

Zie, dit pond vleesch, dat ik van hem verlang, ’t Is duur gekocht.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
By 1993, “pound of flesh” had been used 120 times in courts without reference to Shakespeare. (See William Domnarski, Shakespeare in the Law)
Gates v. United States 33 Fed. Cl. 9 , 13 (1995);
Leasing Service Corporation v. Justice, 673 F.2d 70, 71 (2d Cir. 198l)(Kaufman,J.);
Eldridge v. Burns, 76 Cal. App.3d 396, 432, 142 Cal. Rptr. 845,868 (1978);
Jones v. Jones, 189 Mise. 186, 70 N.Y.S.2d lll, 112 (N.Y. C1v. Ct.1947).

Fie=Exclamation of contempt or dislike
Force=validity
Viands=Dressed meat, food
Compleat:
Fie (or fy)=Foei
Fy upon it! Fy for shame!=Foei ‘t is een schande!

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
This ring, good sir—alas, it is a trifle.
I will not shame myself to give you this.
PORTIA
I will have nothing else but only this.
And now methinks I have a mind to it.
BASSANIO
There’s more depends on this than on the value.
The dearest ring in Venice will I give you,
And find it out by proclamation.
Only for this, I pray you, pardon me.
PORTIA
I see, sir, you are liberal in offers.
You taught me first to beg, and now methinks
You teach me how a beggar should be answered.

DUTCH:
t Is om de waarde niet, ‘t is om den ring;
Den kostbaarste’ in Venetië geef ik u,
Dien openbare navraag vinden laat;
Slechts deze’ alleen, ik bid u, vraag dien niet.

MORE:
Have a mind=My mind is set on doing
Trifle=Worthless
Depends=Is involved
Compleat:
Trifle=Een beuzeling, kleynigheid
I have a mind to go there=Ik ben geneegen/van zin/van meening om daar te gaan
I have a great mind to see it=Ik heb een groote begeerte om het te zien
Proclamation=Eene afkondiging, afleezing, uytroep, plakkaat

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: Lord Talbot
CONTEXT:
The sword of Orleans hath not made me smart;
These words of yours draw life-blood from my heart:
On that advantage, bought with such a shame,
To save a paltry life and slay bright fame,
Before young Talbot from old Talbot fly,
The coward horse that bears me fail and die!
And like me to the peasant boys of France,
To be shame’s scorn and subject of mischance!
Surely, by all the glory you have won,
An if I fly, I am not Talbot’s son:
Then talk no more of flight, it is no boot;
If son to Talbot, die at Talbot’s foot.

DUTCH:
Van ‘t zwaard van Orleans voelde ik geen smart,
Van deze uw woorden bloedt en krimpt mij ‘t hart.

MORE:
Smart=Hurt
Mischance=Misfortune
No boot=Of no use, pointless

Compleat:
Smart=Pijn, smart of smerte
Mischance=Misval, mislukking, ongeval, ongeluk
No boot=Geen nut, te vergeefs

Topics: language, leadership, value, wisdom

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
Conceit, more rich in matter than in words,
Brags of his substance, not of ornament.
They are but beggars that can count their worth.
But my true love is grown to such excess
I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth.

DUTCH:
t Gevoel is rijk in schatten, niet in woorden;
‘t Is trotsch op wat het is, maar mint geen praal;
Wie weet, hoeveel hij waard is, is een beed’laar;

MORE:
Conceit=imagination
Compleat:
To conceit=Zich verbeelden, achten
A pretty conceit=een aardige verbeelding

Topics: poverty and wealth, life, value, imagination, love

PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Jeweller
CONTEXT:
JEWELLER
What, my lord! dispraise?
TIMON
A more satiety of commendations.
If I should pay you for’t as ’tis extolled,
It would unclew me quite.
JEWELLER
My lord, ’tis rated
As those which sell would give: but you well know,
Things of like value differing in the owners
Are prized by their masters: believe’t, dear lord,
You mend the jewel by the wearing it.
TIMON
Well mocked.
MERCHANT
No, my good lord; he speaks the common tongue,
Which all men speak with him.
TIMON
Look, who comes here: will you be chid?

DUTCH:
De prijs is, heer,
Zooals een koopman zou betalen. Doch
Gij weet, naar de bezitters stijgt of daalt
Der dingen waarde. Ja, zoo gij ‘t juweel
Wilt dragen, beste heer, dan wordt het eed’ler.

MORE:
Proverb: The worth of a thing is as it is esteemed (valued)

Dispraise=Censure
Satiety=Excess
Extolled=Praised
Unclew=Unravel, ruin (a clew was a ball of thread)
Rated=Valued
Mend=Increase the value
Chid=Reprimanded
Compleat:
Dispraise=Mispryzen, hoonen, verachten, laaken
Satiety=Zotheyd, verzaadigdheyd
To extoll=Verheffen, pryzen, looven
Clew=Een kluwen
To rate=Waardeeren, schatten, op prys stellen
Mend=Beteren, verbeteren
Chide=Kyven, bekyven

Topics: flattery, business, value, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
Prithee, fair youth,
Think us no churls, nor measure our good minds
By this rude place we live in. Well encountered!
’Tis almost night; you shall have better cheer
Ere you depart, and thanks to stay and eat it.—
Boys, bid him welcome

DUTCH:
Acht ons geen lomperds; schat ons zacht gemoed
Niet naar de woeste woning


Churl=Peasant, rude and ill-bred fellow
To measure=To judge

Compleat:
Churl=Een plompe boer; een vrek
Churlish=Woest, boersch, onbeschoft
To measure a thing by one’s own profit=Een zaak schatten naar het voordeel dat men ‘er van trekt
To measure other peoples corn by one’s own bushel=Een ander by zich zelven afmeeten

Topics: civility, order/society, appearance, value, judgment, poverty and wealth

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
BUCKINGHAM
Pray, give me favour, sir. This cunning cardinal
The articles o’ the combination drew
As himself pleased; and they were ratified
As he cried ‘Thus let be’: to as much end
As give a crutch to the dead: but our count-cardinal
Has done this, and ’tis well; for worthy Wolsey,
Who cannot err, he did it. Now this follows,—
Which, as I take it, is a kind of puppy
To the old dam, treason,—Charles the emperor,
Under pretence to see the queen his aunt—
For ’twas indeed his colour, but he came
To whisper Wolsey,—here makes visitation:
His fears were, that the interview betwixt
England and France might, through their amity,
Breed him some prejudice; for from this league
Peep’d harms that menaced him: he privily
Deals with our cardinal; and, as I trow,—
Which I do well; for I am sure the emperor
Paid ere he promised; whereby his suit was granted
Ere it was ask’d; but when the way was made,
And paved with gold, the emperor thus desired,
That he would please to alter the king’s course,
And break the foresaid peace. Let the king know,
As soon he shall by me, that thus the cardinal
Does buy and sell his honour as he pleases,
And for his own advantage.

DUTCH:
Vergun mij, heer. Die sluwe kardinaal
Heeft al de artikels van ‘t verdrag ontworpen
Naar zijn believen.

MORE:
Combination=League, alliance
Dam=Mother
Colour=Story, excuse
Privily=In private
I trow=I think, believe
Breed=Create, produce
Suit=Request, petition
Paved with gold=Path cleared by bribery
Compleat:
Combination=’t Zamenspanning
Dam=Een dam; de moer van sommige beesten
Colour=Koleur, schyn, dekmantel.
Under colour of=Onder den schyn van.
Privily=Heymelyk, in ‘t geheym
I trow=Ik denk, ik acht
Breed=Teelen, werpen; voortbrengen; veroorzaaken; opvoeden
Suit=Een verzoek, rectsgeding

Topics: value, betrayal, deceit, advantage/benefit

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special observance that you o’erstep not the modesty of nature. For anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is to hold, as ’twere, the mirror up to nature, to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure. Now this overdone or come tardy off, though it make the unskillful laugh, cannot but make the judicious grieve, the censure of the which one must in your allowance o’erweigh a whole theatre of others.

DUTCH:

Wordt dit overdreven, of geschiedt het lamzalig, a
laat het den onkundige lachen, het kan slechts den deskundige verdriet doen, /
Nu dit overdreven of te slap er uitgekomen, kan, ofschoon het alle onkundigen aan het lachen zal maken, niet anders dan ergernis bezorgen aan de lieden van oordeel,

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Shaw v. Eastbome Productions, Ine., 919 F.2d 1353, 1360 (9th Cir. 1990)(Alarcon, J.).

Topics: cited in law, intellect, understanding, value

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.9
SPEAKER: Cominius
CONTEXT:
COMINIUS
You shall not be
The grave of your deserving; Rome must know
The value of her own: ’twere a concealment
Worse than a theft, no less than a traducement,
To hide your doings; and to silence that,
Which, to the spire and top of praises vouch’d,
Would seem but modest: therefore, I beseech you
In sign of what you are, not to reward
What you have done—before our army hear me.
MARTIUS
I have some wounds upon me, and they smart
To hear themselves remember’d.

DUTCH:
Gij moogt het graf
Niet zijn van uw verdienste; Rome wete,
Wat het in u bezit; het waar’ verraad,
‘t Ware erger dan een diefstal, te verhelen,
Wat gij volbracht hebt; dat te zwijgen, wat,
Door welken lof ook hemelhoog verheven,
Toch nog bescheiden klinkt

MORE:
Be the grave of=Bury, swallow up as in a grave
Traducement=Censure, obloquy
Vouch=Maintain, assert
Compleat:
Traduce=Kwaadspreeken, lasteren; (accuse) beschuldigen
To vouch=Staande houden, bewyzen, verzekeren

Topics: merit, flattery, value, achievement

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
We have strict statutes and most biting laws.
The needful bits and curbs to headstrong weeds,
Which for this nineteen years we have let slip;
Even like an o’ergrown lion in a cave,
That goes not out to prey. Now, as fond fathers,
Having bound up the threatening twigs of birch,
Only to stick it in their children’s sight
For terror, not to use, in time the rod
Becomes more mock’d than fear’d; so our decrees,
Dead to infliction, to themselves are dead;
And liberty plucks justice by the nose;
The baby beats the nurse, and quite athwart
Goes all decorum.

DUTCH:
Wij hebben stipte wetten, strenge straffen,
Vereischte breidels voor halsstarr’ge paarden

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, authority, value, respect, justice

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
BUCKINGHAM
O, many
Have broke their backs with laying manors on ’em
For this great journey. What did this vanity
But minister communication of
A most poor issue?
NORFOLK
Grievingly I think
The peace between the French and us not values
The cost that did conclude it.
BUCKINGHAM
Every man,
After the hideous storm that followed, was
A thing inspired and, not consulting, broke
Into a general prophecy: that this tempest,
Dashing the garment of this peace, aboded
The sudden breach on ’t.

DUTCH:
En wat deed die pronk,
Dan dat hij diende voor een samenkomst,
Die luttel vruchts droeg?

MORE:
Proverb: To break one’s back
Manors=Estates
Vanity=Folly
Minister communication=Put into effect
Issue=Outcome
Not values the cost=Isn’t worth the price paid
Dashing=Battering
To abode=To be a (bad) omen
Compleat:
Manor-house=Een huys of slot van den ambachtsheer
Vanity=Ydelheyd
To minister=Bedienen
Issue=Een uytgang, uytslag, uytkomst
Value=Waarderen, achten, schatten
To dash=Slaan, stooten, verbryzelen, spatten
To bode=Voorzeggen, voorspellen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, consequence, value

PLAY: Twelfth Night
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Viola
CONTEXT:
VIOLA
Most certain, if you are she, you do usurp yourself,
for what is yours to bestow is not yours to reserve. But
this is from my commission. I will on with my speech in
your praise and then show you the heart of my message.
OLIVIA
Come to what is important in ’t. I forgive you the
praise.
VIOLA
Alas, I took great pains to study it, and ’tis
poetical.
OLIVIA
It is the more like to be feigned. I pray you, keep it
in. I heard you were saucy at my gates and allowed your
approach rather to wonder at you than to hear you. If
you be not mad, be gone. If you have reason, be brief.
‘Tis not that time of moon with me to make one in so
skipping a dialogue.
MARIA
Will you hoist sail, sir? Here lies your way.
VIOLA
No, good swabber, I am to hull here a little longer.
Some mollification for your giant, sweet lady.

DUTCH:
Zeker, als gij het zijt, matigt gij u uw eigen ik aan;
want wat gij het recht hebt weg te schenken, hebt gij
daarom nog het recht niet voor u te houden.

MORE:
Proverb: Here is the door and there is the way

Usurp=Counterfeit, steal from (supplant)
My commission=Errand
Forgive=Pardon
Saucy=Impertinent
Be not mad=Have any sense
Skipping=Insignificant
Compleat:
To usurp=’t Onrecht aanmaatigen, met geweld in ‘t bezit dringen, overweldigen
Usurpation=Een onrechtmaatige bezitneeming, of indrang, dwinggebruik, overweldiging
Usurping=Een onrechtmaatige bezitting; ‘t onrecht aanmaatigende
Commission=Last, volmagt, lastbrief, provisie
To forgive=Vergeeven, quytshelden
Saucy=Stout, onbeschaamd, baldaadig
Skipping=Springende

Burgersdijk notes:
Uw reus. De kleine Maria gedraagt zich als een grimmige reus, die, zooals in de sprookjes, een schoone princes te bewaken heeft. De twee volgende gezegden worden in de Folio-, en ook in de Globe- editie, aan Viola in den mond gelegd. Zeker onjuist. Op de vraag van Olivia antwoordt Viola,
dat zij geen eigen verlangen te melden heeft, maar slechts een bode is.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, civility, value

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
Unreasonable creatures feed their young;
And though man’s face be fearful to their eyes,
Yet, in protection of their tender ones,
Who hath not seen them, even with those wings
Which sometime they have used with fearful flight,
Make war with him that climb’d unto their nest,
Offer their own lives in their young’s defence?
For shame, my liege, make them your precedent!
Were it not pity that this goodly boy
Should lose his birthright by his father’s fault,
And long hereafter say unto his child,
‘What my great-grandfather and grandsire got
My careless father fondly gave away’?
Ah, what a shame were this! Look on the boy;
And let his manly face, which promiseth
Successful fortune, steel thy melting heart
To hold thine own and leave thine own with him.

DUTCH:
Waar’ ‘t niet een jammer, dat die wakk’re knaap
Zijn erfdeel door zijns vaders schuld zou derven,
En tot zijn zoon in later tijd moest zeggen: —
„Wat groot- en oudgrootvader eens verwierven,
Dat gaf mijn zwakke vader zorgloos weg!”

MORE:

Unreasonable=Without the power of reason (unreasonable creatures=animals)
Fearful=(1)Frightening; (2) Terrified
Sometime=On occasion
Fondly=Foolishly
Steel=To harden

Compleat:
To steel (or harden)=Hardmaaken, verharden
Fond=Zot, dwaas, ongerymt

Topics: reason, courage, value, fate/destiny

PLAY: Antony and Cleopatra
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
Forbear me.
There’s a great spirit gone! Thus did I desire it.
What our contempts doth often hurl from us
We wish it ours again. The present pleasure,
By revolution lowering, does become
The opposite of itself. She’s good, being gone.
The hand could pluck her back that shoved her on.
I must from this enchanting Queen break off
Ten thousand harms, more than the ills I know
My idleness doth hatch. —How now, Enobarbus!

DUTCH:
Daar scheidde een groote geest! Dit was mijn wensch;
Doch wat wij vaak verachtend van ons stieten,
Wij wenschen ‘t weer terug; wat thans ons streelt,
Wordt door der tijden ommezwaai verkeerd
In ‘t tegendeel;

MORE:
Proverb: The worth of a thing is best known by the want

Forbear=Avoid, leave alone
Lowering=Reduction
By revolution=With every turn of the wheel (fig.)
Idleness=Lack of occupation, responsibility
Compleat:
Forbear=Zich van onthouden
Revolution=Loop, omwenteling
Idleness=Luyheyd, traagheyd, leediggang, ledigheyd

Topics: proverbs and idioms, regret, value

PLAY: Antony and Cleopatra
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Menas
CONTEXT:
POMPEY
If the great gods be just, they shall assist
The deeds of justest men.
MENAS
Know, worthy Pompey,
That what they do delay, they not deny.
POMPEY
Whiles we are suitors to their throne, decays
The thing we sue for.
MENAS
We, ignorant of ourselves,
Beg often our own harms, which the wise powers
Deny us for our good, so find we profit
By losing of our prayers.
POMPEY
I shall do well.
The people love me, and the sea is mine.
My powers are crescent, and my auguring hope
Says it will come to th’ full. Mark Antony
In Egypt sits at dinner, and will make
No wars without doors. Caesar gets money where
He loses hearts. Lepidus flatters both,
Of both is flattered, but he neither loves,
Nor either cares for him.

DUTCH:
Geduld, Pompeius!
Wat zij verdagen, is niet afgeslagen.

MORE:
Whiles we are suitors=While we are praying
Decays=Loses value
Auguring=Prophesying
Without doors=Outside
Compleat:
While=Een wyl, poos; terwijl
Between whiles=Bij tusschenpoozen, van tyd tot tyd
Decay=Voorval, afneeming, verwelking, veroudering, vermindering, ondergang
An augur=Een vogel-waarzegger
To augurate=Voorzeggen, voorspellen
Without=Van buyten, buyten

Topics: fate/destiny, honesty, value, wisdom

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
Well, come, my Kate. We will unto your father’s
Even in these honest mean habiliments.
Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor,
For ’tis the mind that makes the body rich,
And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds,
So honour peereth in the meanest habit.
What, is the jay more precious than the lark
Because his feathers are more beautiful?
Or is the adder better than the eel
Because his painted skin contents the eye?
Oh, no, good Kate. Neither art thou the worse
For this poor furniture and mean array.
If thou account’st it shame, lay it on me,
And therefore frolic! We will hence forthwith
To feast and sport us at thy father’s house.
Go, call my men, and let us straight to him,
And bring our horses unto Long Lane end.
There will we mount, and thither walk on foot.
Let’s see, I think ’tis now some seven o’clock,
And well we may come there by dinnertime.
KATHERINE
I dare assure you, sir, ’tis almost two,
And ’twill be supper time ere you come there.
PETRUCHIO
It shall be seven ere I go to horse.
Look what I speak, or do, or think to do,
You are still crossing it. Sirs, let ’t alone.
I will not go today, and ere I do
It shall be what o’clock I say it is.

DUTCH:
Wie schat den meerkol hooger dan den leeuwrik,
Omdat zijn veed’ren fraaier zijn van kleur?

MORE:
Mean habiliments=Plain clothes
Proud=Full
Peereth=Peeps out, can be seen
Habit=Attire
Painted=Patterned
Furniture=Clothes
Array=Attire
Lay it on=Blame
Look what=Whatever
Still=Always
Crossing=Contradicting
Compleat:
Habiliment=Kleeding, dos, gewaad
To peer out=Uitmunten, uitsteeken
Habit=Een kleed, gewaad, dos
Furniture=Stoffeersel
Array=Gewaad, kleeding
To lay upon=Opleggen, te laste leggen
Still=Steeds, gestadig, altyd
To cross=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, dwarsboomen, wederestreeven, kruisen

Topics: fashion/trends, poverty and wealth, appearance, value, vanity

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
Forgive him, Angelo, that brought you home
The head of Ragozine for Claudio’s:
The offence pardons itself. Dear Isabel,
I have a motion much imports your good;
Whereto if you’ll a willing ear incline,
What’s mine is yours and what is yours is mine.
So, bring us to our palace; where we’ll show
What’s yet behind, that’s meet you all should know.

DUTCH:
Ik heb een wensch, die uw geluk beoogt;
Vind ik gehoor, wilt gij de mijne zijn,
Dan is al ‘t mijne ‘t uwe, ‘t uwe mijn.

MORE:
A motion much imports your good=A proposal that will benefit you

Topics: offence, equality, value, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Sir, I hope
My words disbench’d you not.
CORIOLANUS
No, sir: yet oft,
When blows have made me stay, I fled from words.
You soothed not, therefore hurt not: but
your people,
I love them as they weigh.
MENENIUS
Pray now, sit down.
CORIOLANUS
I had rather have one scratch my head i’ the sun
When the alarum were struck than idly sit
To hear my nothings monster’d.
MENENIUS
Masters of the people,
Your multiplying spawn how can he flatter—
That’s thousand to one good one—when you now see
He had rather venture all his limbs for honour
Than one on’s ears to hear it? Proceed, Cominius.

DUTCH:
Hield ik voor slagen stand, en vlood voor woorden.
Gij vleit niet, dus gij krenkt niet. Doch, uw burgers
Bemin ik naar zij waard zijn.

MORE:
Disbenched=Upset (unseated)
Soothed not=Did not flatter
As they weigh=According to their weight or value
Monstered=Described as remarkable
Multiplying spawn=Common people
Venture=Risk
Compleat:
To sooth up=Vleijen, flikflooien
To weigh or be of weight (to be considerable, important)=Van gewigt, belang, aanzienlyk zyn
To ventiure=Waagen

Topics: resolution, remedy, value, flattery

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Countess§
CONTEXT:
KING
We lost a jewel of her; and our esteem
Was made much poorer by it: but your son,
As mad in folly, lacked the sense to know
Her estimation home.
COUNTESS
‘Tis past, my liege;
And I beseech your majesty to make it
Natural rebellion, done i’ the blade of youth;
When oil and fire, too strong for reason’s force,
O’erbears it and burns on.
KING
My honoured lady,
I have forgiven and forgotten all;
Though my revenges were high bent upon him,
And watched the time to shoot.

DUTCH:
t Is voorbij, mijn vorst;
En ik verzoek uw hoogheid: in uw oogen
Zij ‘t oproer van het jeugdig bloed, dat blaakt,
Als vuur en olie, sterker dan de rede,
Haar overheert en voortbrandt.

MORE:
Esteem=Worth (own worth)
Estimation=Value
Home=To the full
Make=Consider
Blade=Green shoot, callowness of youth
High bent=Bent to breaking point
Watch the time=Wait patiently
Compleat:
Esteem=Achting, waarde
Estimation=Waardering, schatting
Blade=Blad van een gewas; een Jonker
I have got the bent of his bow=Ik weet wel waar hy heen wil
Watch=Waaken, bespieden
Bent=Buiging, neiging

Topics: value, mercy, revenge, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
Ungracious boy, henceforth ne’er look on me. Thou art violently carried away from grace. There is a devil haunts thee in the likeness of an old fat man. A tun of man is thy companion. Why dost thou converse with that trunk of humors, that bolting-hutch of beastliness, that swollen parcel of dropsies, that huge bombard of sack, that stuffed cloakbag of guts, that roasted Manningtree ox with the pudding in his belly, that reverend Vice, that gray iniquity, that father ruffian, that vanity in years? Wherein is he good, but to taste sack and drink it? Wherein neat and cleanly but to carve a capon and eat it? Wherein cunning but in craft? Wherein crafty but in villany? Wherein villanous but in all things? Wherein worthy but in nothing?
FALSTAFF
I would your grace would take me with you: whom
means your grace

DUTCH:
Gij laat u met geweld wegsleuren van de genade; er is een duivel, die om u waart in de gedaante van een vetten ouden man; een ton van een man is uw kameraad. Waarom verkeert gij met die kist vol grillen, dien builtrog van dierlijkheid, die opgeblazen baal waterzucht, dat buikig stiikvat sek, dat volgepropte darmenvalies, dien gebraden kermisos met den beuling in ‘t lijf, die eerwaardige ondeugd, die grijze verdorvenheid, dien vader losbol, die ijdelheid op jaren?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Ungracious=impious, wicked
Vanity= worthlessness
Take me with you=Explain your meaning
Burgersdijk notes:
In de Oud-Engelsche spelen trad als komische persoon de Ondeugd, Vice, dikwijls op; hij was met een houten zwaard gewapend.
Dien gebraden kermis-os. In’t Engelsch staat: Dien gebraden Manningtree-ox. Manningtree was een plaats in het weide- en veerijke graafschap Essex, waar op de jaarmarkt steeds een geheele os met de ingewanden in ‘t lijf werd gebraden. Bij die gelegenheid werden er dan ook volksschouwspelen, zoogenaamde Moraliteiten , gegeven, waarin doorgaans de allegorische personen Ondeugd, Goddeloosheid of Verdorvenheid, en IJdelheid, Vice, Iniquity en Vanity, optraden. Van daar dat de Prins Falstaff eerst met den os en dan met die allegorische personen vergelijkt.

Topics: insult, offence, value, order/society, understanding

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
Good my lord,
You are full of heavenly stuff, and bear the inventory
Of your best graces in your mind; the which
You were now running o’er: you have scarce time
To steal from spiritual leisure a brief span
To keep your earthly audit: sure, in that
I deem you an ill husband, and am glad
To have you therein my companion.

DUTCH:
Mijn waarde lord,
Vol heil’ge schatten zijt ge, en de’ inventaris
Van uw genadegaven draagt ge in ‘t hart;
Dien liept gij juist eens door.

MORE:
Stuff=Characteristics, substance
Grace=Virtue, best qualities
Audit=Reckoning
Husband=Manager (ref. husbandry)
Compleat:
Stuff=Stof, stoff
Grace=Gunst, bevalligheid
Husbandman=Akkerman, landman
Husband of a ship=Iemand die zorg draaft voor het aangeeven, lossen, en zolderen van een scheeps laading, een boekhouder van een schip

Topics: value, merit, respect, marriage

PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Timon
CONTEXT:
TIMON
You do yourselves
Much wrong, you bate too much of your own merits:
Here, my lord, a trifle of our love.
SECOND LORD
With more than common thanks I will receive it.
THIRD LORD
O, he’s the very soul of bounty!
TIMON
And now I remember, my lord, you gave
Good words the other day of a bay courser
I rode on: it is yours, because you liked it.
SECOND LORD
O, I beseech you, pardon me, my lord, in that.
TIMON
You may take my word, my lord; I know, no man
Can justly praise but what he does affect:
I weigh my friend’s affection with mine own;
I’ll tell you true. I’ll call to you.–

DUTCH:
Gij doet uzelven onrecht en verkleint
Te zeer uw eigen waarde. — Hier, mijn vriend,
Een klein bewijs van onze vriendschap.

MORE:
Bate=Underestimate
Trifle=Small token
Courser=Horse
Affect=Desire
Weigh=Equate
Compleat:
To bate=Verminderen, afkorten, afsyaan
Trifle=Beuzeling, kleynigheyd
Courser=Een looper, renner
Affect=Liefde toedragen, ter harte gaan, beminnen
To weigh=Weegen, overweegen

Topics: value, loyalty, friendship

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Troilus
CONTEXT:
TROILUS
I take today a wife, and my election
Is led on in the conduct of my will;
My will enkindled by mine eyes and ears,
Two traded pilots ‘twixt the dangerous shores
Of will and judgement: how may I avoid,
Although my will distaste what it elected,
The wife I chose? there can be no evasion
To blench from this and to stand firm by honour:
We turn not back the silks upon the merchant,
When we have soiled them, nor the remainder viands
We do not throw in unrespective sieve,
Because we now are full. It was thought meet
Paris should do some vengeance on the Greeks:
Your breath of full consent bellied his sails;
The seas and winds, old wranglers, took a truce
And did him service: he touched the ports desired,
And for an old aunt whom the Greeks held captive,
He brought a Grecian queen, whose youth and freshness
Wrinkles Apollo’s, and makes stale the morning.

DUTCH:
Uws bijvals adem blies zijn zeilen vol;
De wind en golven, oude twisters, voerden,
Een wijl verzoend, hem naar ‘t gewenschte strand

MORE:
I take today=What if I were today to take
Election=Choice
Conduct=Guidance
Traded=Experienced
Blench=Flinch, back away from
Turn upon=Return to
Viands=Meat; food, victuals
Unrespective=Undiscriminating
Bellied=Swelled
Wrangler=Adversary
Compleat:
To eleect=Kiezen, verkiezen
Conduct=Bestieren, geleyden
Traded=Gehandeld
Viands=Spyzen van vleesch
Wrangler=Krakeelder

Topics: independence, free will, value

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Martius
CONTEXT:
He that will give good words to thee will flatter
Beneath abhorring. What would you have, you curs,
That like nor peace nor war? The one affrights you,
The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you,
Where he should find you lions, finds you hares;
Where foxes, geese: you are no surer, no,
Than is the coal of fire upon the ice,
Or hailstone in the sun. Your virtue is
To make him worthy whose offence subdues him
And curse that justice did it.
Who deserves greatness
Deserves your hate; and your affections are
A sick man’s appetite, who desires most that
Which would increase his evil. He that depends
Upon your favours swims with fins of lead
And hews down oaks with rushes. Hang ye! Trust Ye?
With every minute you do change a mind,
And call him noble that was now your hate,
Him vile that was your garland. What’s the matter,
That in these several places of the city
You cry against the noble senate, who,
Under the gods, keep you in awe, which else
Would feed on one another? What’s their seeking?

DUTCH:
Een vriend’lijk woord tot u waar’ laag gevlei,
Geen afschuw waard

MORE:
Virtue=Merit, what you excel in
Make worthy=Exalt, glorify
Proud=Full of self-esteem, haughty
Offence subdues=Ruined, disabled, tamed, crushed by their crime
Sure=Reliable, stable
Garland=Champion
Compleat:
Worthy=Waardig, eerwaardig, voortreffelyk, uytmuntend, deftig
Subdue=Onderbrengen
Virtue (efficacy, power, propriety)=Kracht, vermogen, hoedanigheid, eigenschap
Proud=Hovaardig, hoogmoedig, verwaand

Topics: flattery, trust, justice, merit, value

Go to Top