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PLAY: Hamlet ACT/SCENE: 3.4 SPEAKER: Hamlet CONTEXT: For in the fatness of these pursy times
Virtue itself of vice must pardon beg;
Yea, curb and woo, for leave to do him good. DUTCH: In deze ontaarde tijden moet de deugd vaak aan de ondeugd vergiffenis vragen. /
In deze tijd van logge slemplust moet, De deugd zelfs de ondeugd om verschoning smeken /
Maar in een tijd zo vadsig van genot moet deugd voor ondeugd op de knieën vallen en smeken om haar goed te mogen doen.
MORE: Schmidt:
Pursy=(i) fat/corpulent/flabby or (ii) pampered/excessive wealth/Decadent
Fatness=Fullness of flesh, grossness, gross and dull sensuality
Curb=beg/stoop
Woo=seek permission Topics: virtue, excess

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
All places that the eye of heaven visits
Are to a wise man ports and happy havens.
Teach thy necessity to reason thus;
There is no virtue like necessity.
Think not the king did banish thee,
But thou the king. Woe doth the heavier sit,
Where it perceives it is but faintly borne.

DUTCH:
Elk oord, welk ook, waar ‘s hemels oog op neêrblikt,
Is voor den wijze een haven van geluk.

MORE:

Proverb: A wise man may live anywhere
Proverb: Make a virtue of necessity
Proverb: Injuries slighted become none at all
Proverb: A wise (valiant) man make every country his own

Topics: virtue, neccessity, wisdom, proverbs and idioms, still in use, sorrow

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Good night—but go not to mine uncle’s bed.
Assume a virtue if you have it not.
That monster, custom, who all sense doth eat,
Of habits devil, is angel yet in this:
That to the use of actions fair and good
He likewise gives a frock or livery
That aptly is put on.

DUTCH:
Meet je een deugd aan, als je er geen hebt. /
Veins deugdzaamheid, als gij haar niet bezit /
Neem u een deugd, zoo gij die niet bezit.

MORE:
Assume a virtue = pretend to be virtuous, i.e. encouragement here to practice deception.

Topics: deceit, appearance, virtue

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
Your grace hath still been famed for virtuous;
And now may seem as wise as virtuous,
By spying and avoiding fortune’s malice,
For few men rightly temper with the stars:
Yet in this one thing let me blame your grace,
For choosing me when Clarence is in place.

DUTCH:
Want zelden volgt de mensch den wenk der sterren

MORE:

Still=Always
Temper with=Align with, conform to
In place=Present

Compleat:
Still=Steeds, gestadig, altyd
To temper= (moderate) Maatigen

Topics: virtue, fate/destiny, wisdom

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
His sole child, my lord, and bequeathed to my
overlooking. I have those hopes of her good that
her education promises; her dispositions she
inherits, which makes fair gifts fairer; for where
an unclean mind carries virtuous qualities, there
commendations go with pity; they are virtues and
traitors too; in her they are the better for their
simpleness; she derives her honesty and achieves her
goodness.

DUTCH:
Ik heb alle verwachting van het goede, dat hare opvoeding belooft; de natuur, die zij geërfd heeft, maakt de schoone gaven, die opvoeding schenkt, nog schooner;

MORE:
Proverb: Blood is inherited but virtue is achieved
Overlooking=Guardianship
Fated=Fateful (see also King Lear “The plagues that hang fated over men’s faults”, 3.2)
Go with pity=Accompanied by regret
Simpleness=Plainness (being unmixed), unrefined nativeness, innocence
Unclean=(in a moral sense) Impure
Derive=Inherit
Compleat:
Disposition (or Inclination)=Genegenheid, Lust
Disposition of mind=Gesteltenis van gemoed
Simple=Onbeschadigend, eenvoudig
Fated=Door ‘t noodlot beschooren

Topics: nature, learning/education, virtue, innocence, fate/destiny, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
‘Tis only title thou disdain’st in her, the which
I can build up. Strange is it that our bloods,
Of colour, weight, and heat, pour’d all together,
Would quite confound distinction, yet stand off
In differences so mighty. If she be
All that is virtuous, save what thou dislikest,
A poor physician’s daughter, thou dislikest
Of virtue for the name: but do not so:
From lowest place when virtuous things proceed,
The place is dignified by the doer’s deed:
Where great additions swell’s, and virtue none,
It is a dropsied honour. Good alone
Is good without a name. Vileness is so:
The property by what it is should go,
Not by the title. She is young, wise, fair;
In these to nature she’s immediate heir,
And these breed honour: that is honour’s scorn,
Which challenges itself as honour’s born
And is not like the sire: honours thrive,
When rather from our acts we them derive
Than our foregoers: the mere word’s a slave
Debauched on every tomb, on every grave
A lying trophy, and as oft is dumb
Where dust and damn’d oblivion is the tomb
Of honour’d bones indeed. What should be said?
If thou canst like this creature as a maid,
I can create the rest: virtue and she
Is her own dower; honour and wealth from me.

DUTCH:
Ontspruit een edel doen uit lagen staat,
Die wordt verhoogd, geadeld door de daad;
Wie zwelt van trots, op deugd niet, maar op bloed,
Heeft waterzuchtige’ adel.

MORE:
Proverb: There is no difference of bloods in a basin
Proverb: Man honours the place, not the place the man
Additions=Titles
Dignify=To give lustre to, to honour
Swell (swell us or swell is– debated)=Inflate
Dropsied= Diseased (with dropsy)
Dislike=Disapprove, regard with ill-will or disgust
Compleat:
Addition=Bydoening, byvoegsel
Dropsy=Waterzucht
Swell=Swellen, opblaazen; Uitzetten, grootr worden, oploopen; zwellen
Dislike=Mishaagen, misnoegen

Topics: virtue, order/society, status, dignity, status

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Portia
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
I never did repent for doing good,
Nor shall not now; for in companions
That do converse and waste the time together
Whose souls do bear an equal yoke of love,
There must be needs a like proportion
Of lineaments, of manners, and of spirit,
Which makes me think that this Antonio,
Being the bosom lover of my lord,
Must needs be like my lord. If it be so,
How little is the cost I have bestowed
In purchasing the semblance of my soul
From out the state of hellish cruelty!
This comes too near the praising of myself.
Therefore no more of it. Hear other things.
Lorenzo, I commit into your hands
The husbandry and manage of my house
Until my lord’s return.
For mine own part,
I have toward heaven breathed a secret vow
To live in prayer and contemplation,
Only attended by Nerissa here
Until her husband and my lord’s return.
There is a monastery two miles off,
And there will we abide. I do desire you
Not to deny this imposition,
The which my love and some necessity
Now lays upon you.

DUTCH:
Nooit heeft mij nog een goede daad berouwd,
En deez’ zal ‘t ook niet doen; want trouwe makkers,
Die samen immer leven en verkeeren,
Wier zielen saam een juk van vriendschap dragen,
Gelijk verdeeld, die moeten wel gelijk zijn
In wezenstrekken, geest en wijs van doen;

MORE:
Waste=Spend
Lineaments=Features
Semblance=Similarity
Husbandry=Care, cultivation, tillage
Manage=Management
Deny=Refuse
Imposition=Charge
Compleat:
Waste=Doorbrengen
Lineament=Een trek
Semblance=Gelykenis, schyn
Husbandry=Huysbezorging
Manage=Bewind, bestiering
Imposition=Oplegging, opdringing, belasting

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Where virtue is, these are more virtuous.
Nor from mine own weak merits will I draw
The smallest fear or doubt of her revolt,
For she had eyes and chose me. No, Iago,
I’ll see before I doubt, when I doubt, prove,
And on the proof there is no more but this:
Away at once with love or jealousy!

DUTCH:
Nee, vóór ik twijfel,
wil ik eerst zien, ná twijfel eerst bewijs.
Als dat bewijs er is, is het meteen
met liefde uit en uit met jaloezie.

MORE:

Doubt=Suspicion
Revolt=Gross departure from duty; unfaithfulness

Compleat:
Revolt=Afvallen, oproerig worden, aan ‘t muiten slaan

Topics: suspicion, evidence, virtue, merit, flaw/fault, betrayal

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
O cunning enemy, that, to catch a saint,
With saints dost bait thy hook! Most dangerous
Is that temptation that doth goad us on
To sin in loving virtue: never could the strumpet,
With all her double vigour, art and nature,
Once stir my temper; but this virtuous maid
Subdues me quite.

DUTCH:
O listige euv’le, die een heil’ge kiest,
Tot lokaas voor een heil’ge !

MORE:
Schmidt:
Temper=Disposition, constitution, temperament
Stir my temper=Excite, move, rouse, agitate
Subdue (in a moral sense)=To prevail over, to subjugate, to render submissive
Compleat:
Temper=Gesteltenis. To be in a good temper=In een goede gesteltenis zyn.
To shew or carry on an even temper=Een bedaardheid van gemoed vertoonen.
Subdue=Onderbrengen, overwinnen, temmen
To subdue the flesh=Het vleesch temmen

Topics: temptation, good and bad, virtue

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
For I dare so far free him—made him fear’d,
So hated, and so banish’d: but he has a merit,
To choke it in the utterance. So our virtues
Lie in the interpretation of the time:
And power, unto itself most commendable,
Hath not a tomb so evident as a chair
To extol what it hath done.
One fire drives out one fire; one nail, one nail;
Rights by rights falter, strengths by strengths do fail.
Come, let’s away. When, Caius, Rome is thine,
Thou art poor’st of all; then shortly art thou mine.

DUTCH:
Voor nagels wijken nagels, gloed voor gloed;
Door rechten struik’len rechten, moed breekt moed.

MORE:
Proverb: Fire drives out fire (1592)
Proverb: One fire (or one nail or one poison) drives out another.

In the interpretation of the time=Evaluation according to prevailing standards
Unto itself most commendable=Having a very high opinion of itself

Schmidt:
Extol=Praise, magnify
Chair=A seat of public authority

Compleat:
Chair of state=Zetel
Extoll=Verheffen, pryzen, looven
To extol one, raise him up to the sky=Iemand tot den Hemel toe verheffen
Highly commendable=Ten hoogste pryselyk

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, merit, virtue, reputation, ruin, remedy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Poor and content is rich, and rich enough,
But riches fineless is as poor as winter
To him that ever fears he shall be poor.
Good heaven, the souls of all my
OTHELLO
Why, why is this?
Think’st thou I’d make a life of jealousy,
To follow still the changes of the moon
With fresh suspicions? No, to be once in doubt
Is once to be resolved. Exchange me for a goat
When I shall turn the business of my soul
To such exsufflicate and blown surmises
Matching thy inference. ‘Tis not to make me jealous
To say my wife is fair, feeds well, loves company,
Is free of speech, sings, plays, and dances well :
Where virtue is, these are more virtuous. tribe defend
From jealousy!

DUTCH:
Arm en tevreden is rijk, en rijk genoeg

MORE:

Proverb: The greatest wealth is contentment with a little

Fineless=Infinite, boundless
Resolved=Convinced, Fixed in a determination
Once=Once and for all

Schmidt:
Exsufflicate (Exufflicate)=From exsufflare, probably synonymous to blown=`puffed jup, inflated; empty, unsubstantial, frivolous.

Compleat:
Resolve (untie, decide, determine a hard question, difficulty etc.)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopten
Resolve (deliberation, decision)=Beraad, beslissing, uitsluitsel

Topics: poverty and wealth, satisfaction, proverbs and idioms, virtue, envy

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Escalus
CONTEXT:
Well, heaven forgive him! and forgive us all!
Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall:
Some run from brakes of vice, and answer none:
And some condemned for a fault alone.

DUTCH:
Sommigen rijzen door ondeugd, anderen komen door deugd ten val/
De een stijgt door schuld, door deugd moet de ander vallen

MORE:
Also versions with ‘brakes of ice’.
Schmidt:
Meaning of brakes is disputed; from the context it should be understood in the sense of “engines of torture”. Brakes was used to mean a collection.

Topics: good and bad, corruption, virtue, error, punishment, fate/destiny

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
So may the outward shows be least themselves.
The world is still deceived with ornament.
In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil? In religion,
What damned error, but some sober brow
Will bless it and approve it with a text,
Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?
There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.
How many cowards whose hearts are all as false
As stairs of sand wear yet upon their chins
The beards of Hercules and frowning Mars,
Who, inward searched, have livers white as milk,
And these assume but valour’s excrement
To render them redoubted…

DUTCH:
Ge§en boosheid, die de slimheid mist, om zich
Met de’ uiterlijken schijn van deugd te sieren.

MORE:
No vice so simple=any vice can be disguised.
‘Stairs of sand’ to convey the idea of weakness and instability was coined by Shakespeare.
Also used as the title for a 1929 silent film.

See also:
In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil?

Simple=Silly, witless, weak in intellect.
Livers white as milk – white livers used to signify cowardice. Hence lily-livered (Macbeth, 5.3) and milk-livered (King Lear, 4.2), both compounds coined by Shakespeare
Compleat:
White livered=Een die ‘er altyd bleek uitziet, een bleek-neus, kwaaraardig, nydig.
Simple=Zot, dwaas, onnozel

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
There’s nothing ill can dwell in such a temple.
If the ill spirit have so fair a house,
Good things will strive to dwell with ’t.

DUTCH:
In zulk een tempel kan geen boosheid wonen;
Waar’ ‘s Boozen huis zoo schoon, wat goed is trachtte
Met hem ‘t verblijf te deelen.

MORE:
In Shakespeare’s time beauty was seen as a signifier of virtue. See Thomas Hoby’s translation of the Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier(1561). Fourth Book: True beauty, the reflection of
goodness.

Topics: virtue, appearance, agood and bad

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Ah, gracious lord, these days are dangerous.
Virtue is choked with foul ambition,
And charity chased hence by rancor’s hand;
Foul subornation is predominant,
And equity exiled your Highness’ land.
I know their complot is to have my life;
And if my death might make this island happy
And prove the period of their tyranny,
I would expend it with all willingness.
But mine is made the prologue to their play;
For thousands more, that yet suspect no peril,
Will not conclude their plotted tragedy.

DUTCH:
0, beste heer, de tijden zijn gevaarlijk.
Door schandlijke eerzucht wordt de deugd verstikt,
Door hoozen wrok barmhartigheid verjaagd;

MORE:

Subornation=Instigation to perjury
Predominant=Prevalent, in the ascendant (astrolology)
Equity=Justice
Complot=Conspiracy

Compleat:
Subornation=Besteeking, een bestoken werk, omkooping
To suborn a witness=Eenen getuige opmaaken of omkoopen
Equity=Billijkheid
Complot=Saamenrotten
Predominant=’t Geene het hoogste gebied voert, opperheerschend, heerschappy voerend

Topics: virtue, ambition, envy, justice, conspiracy, plans/intentions

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
ISABELLA
Let me hear you speak farther. I have spirit to do
anything that appears not foul in the truth of my spirit.
DUKE VINCENTIO
Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful. Have
you not heard speak of Mariana, the sister of
Frederick the great soldier who miscarried at sea?

DUTCH:
Deugd is moedig en goedheid nooit bang./
Deugd is moedig en een good hart nimmer bevreesd.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Spirit=Vivacity, mettle, fire, courage
Foul=Wicket, impure
Spirit(2)=Mind, soul
Compleat:
Spirit=Moed
Foul=Valsch. Foul dealing=Kwaade praktyken, A foul aciton=Een slechte daad.
Spirit(2)=Geest

Topics: virtue, courage, honesty

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Not so, my lord. Your ill angel is light, but I hope he that
looks upon me will take me without weighing. And yet in
some respects I grant I cannot go. I cannot tell. Virtue is of
so little regard in these costermongers’ times that true valor
is turned bear-herd; pregnancy is made a tapster, and hath his
quick wit wasted in giving reckonings. All the other gifts
appurtenant to man, as the malice of this age shapes them,
are not worth a gooseberry. You that are old consider not the
capacities of us that are young. You do measure the heat of
our livers with the bitterness of your galls, and we that are in
the vaward of our youth, I must confess, are wags too.

DUTCH:
De deugd is in deze kruidenierstijden zoo weinig in aanzien, dat echte dapperheid berenhoeder moet worden.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Angel=A coin (ill angel=false coin, a coin that is light (clipped)) (Every person was traditionally thought to have a good angel and a bad angel, sometimes appearing in the morality plays)
Regard=Opinion, estimation, or judgement
Costermonger=A petty dealer, a mercenary soul, (In these costermonger times: These times when the prevalence of trade has produced that meanness that rates the merit of every thing by money. Johnson)
Bear-herd (other passages have berrord, berard and bearard)=Bear leader
Pregnancy=Cleverness
Malice=Malignity, disposition to injure others
Liver=Regarded as the seat of love and passion
Gall=Source of bile, hence seat of rancour
Vaward=Vanguard
Wag=Light-hearted youth, joker

Compleat:
Costermonger (one who sells fruit)=Fruitkooper
Pregnancy of wit=Doordringendheid van verstand
Malice=Kwaadaardigheid, boosheid, spyt, kwaadheid
Wag=Een potsemaaker, boef
Vaward=Voorhoede

Topics: virtue, age/experience, money, honesty

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
For naught so vile that on the earth doth live
But to the earth some special good doth give.
Nor aught so good but, strained from that fair use
Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse.
Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied,
And vice sometime by action dignified.

DUTCH:
Niets zoo gering van wat op aarde leeft,
Dat niet aan de aarde iets goeds, iets nuttigs geeft;
En niets zoo goed, dat, in verkeerde hand,
Zijn oorsprong niet, door ‘t misbruik, maakt te schand;
In ondeugd wordt door misbruik deugd verkeerd,
Door waardig handlen ondeugd soms geëerd.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Vile=base, bad, abject
Onions:
True birth=nature. (Revolts from=Rebels against nature)

Topics: nature, good and bad, virtue, abuse

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
‘Twas a good lady, ’twas a good lady: we may pick a thousand salads ere we light on such another herb.
CLOWN
Indeed, sir, she was the sweet marjoram of the salad, or rather the herb of grace.
LAFEW
They are not herbs, you knave; they are nose-herbs.
CLOWN
I am no great Nebuchadnezzar, sir; I have not much skill in grass.

DUTCH:
Zij was een good meisjen, een good meisjen; wij kunnen duizendmaal veldsalade zoeken, eer wij zulk een kruid weer lezen.

MORE:
Herb of grace=Rue
Nose-herbs=Scented flowers (nosegay) cultivated for fragrance
Grass/grace pun: Nebuchadnezzar lost his sanity and “was driven from men and did eat grass as oxen”.
Compleat:
Nosegay=Een ruikertje, tuiltje
Burgersdijk notes:
Het genadekruid. “The herb of grace”. Een oogenblik later zegt de nar: “I have not much skill in grass”. De woordspeling met grace en grass was natuurljjk niet terug te geven .Het genadekruid is de wijnruit, Ruta graveolens. Verg. Richard II, 3.4.

Topics: virtue, reputation

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
Thy mother was a piece of virtue, and
She said thou wast my daughter; and thy father
Was Duke of Milan, and his only heir
And princess, no worse issued.
MIRANDA
O, the heavens!
What foul play had we that we came from thence?
Or blessed wast we did?
PROSPERO
Both, both, my girl.
By foul play, as thou sayst, were we heaved thence,
But blessedly holp hither.

DUTCH:
0, hemel!
Wat booze treken dreven ons van daar?
Of brachten zij ons zegen?

MORE:
Piece of virtue=Masterpiece, perfect specimen or
Worse issue=Lower (no worse issued = not of lesser birth than a pricess)
Holp=Short for holpen, helped
Compleat:
Holpen=Geholpen
Holp op=Opgeholpen
Ill holp op=In een slegte staat laaten
Issue=Afkomst, afkomeling

Topics: virtue, understanding, status, foul play, fate/destiny

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