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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry V ACT/SCENE: 4.3 SPEAKER: King Henry CONTEXT: KING HENRY
All things are ready if our minds be so.
WESTMORELAND
Perish the man whose mind is backward now! DUTCH: Wij zijn geheel gereed, zoo ‘t hart het is. MORE: Topics: wellbeing, emotion and mood, preparation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
The duke! Why, Warwick, when we parted,
Thou call’dst me king.
WARWICK
Ay, but the case is alter’d:
When you disgraced me in my embassade,
Then I degraded you from being king,
And come now to create you Duke of York.
Alas! How should you govern any kingdom,
That know not how to use ambassadors,
Nor how to be contented with one wife,
Nor how to use your brothers brotherly,
Nor how to study for the people’s welfare,
Nor how to shroud yourself from enemies?

DUTCH:
Ja, maar ‘t is nu anders.
Toen gij mij als gezant beschaamd deed staan,
Toen heb ik u als koning afgezet,
En thans benoem ik u tot hertog York.

MORE:

Proverb: The case is altered, quoth Plowden

Embassade=Diplomatic mission
Study for=Work to ensure
Shroud=Shelter, protect
Use=Treat

Compleat:
To shroud (shrowd)=Bedekken; beschutten; to shrowd one’s self=Zich verbergen, in veiligheid stellen
To use (or treat) one well or ill=Iemand wel of kwaalyk behandelen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, satisfaction, wellbeing

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus
CONTEXT:
He that commends me to mine own content
Commends me to the thing I cannot get.
I to the world am like a drop of water
That in the ocean seeks another drop,
Who, falling there to find his fellow forth,
Unseen, inquisitive, confounds himself,
So I, to find a mother and a brother,
In quest of them, unhappy, lose myself.

DUTCH:
Die mij genoegen met mijzelven wenscht,
Die wenscht mij toe, wat zeker niet gebeurt.

MORE:
Content=Contentment
Find forth=Seek out
To the world=Compared with, in relation to, the world
Onions:
Confounds himself=Mingles indistinguishably with the rest, loses himself
Unhappy=Unfortunate

Compleat:
Content=Voldoening, genoegen

Topics: satisfaction, emotion and mood, wellbeing

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Northumberland
CONTEXT:
For this I shall have time enough to mourn.
In poison there is physic, and these news,
Having been well, that would have made me sick,
Being sick, have in some measure made me well.
And as the wretch whose fever-weakened joints,
Like strengthless hinges, buckle under life,
Impatient of his fit, breaks like a fire
Out of his keeper’s arms, even so my limbs,
Weakened with grief, being now enraged with grief,
Are thrice themselves. Hence therefore, thou nice crutch.
A scaly gauntlet now with joints of steel
Must glove this hand.

DUTCH:
k Zal lang genoeg hierover kunnen treuren.
In gift schuilt artsenijkracht; en dit nieuws,
Dat, ware ik wel, mij krank gemaakt zou hebben,
Maakt, nu ik krank ben, bijna mij gezond

MORE:

Physic=Medicine
Having been=Had I been
Fit=Illness
Keeper=Nurse
Nice=Effeminate, not manly

Compleat:
Physick=Artseny, medicyn, geneesmiddel
To physick=Geneesmiddelen gebruiken, medicineeren

Topics: wellbeing, remedy

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Gaunt
CONTEXT:
O, had thy grandsire with a prophet’s eye
Seen how his son’s son should destroy his sons,
From forth thy reach he would have laid thy shame,
Deposing thee before thou wert possessed,
Which art possessed now to depose thyself.
Why, cousin, wert thou regent of the world,
It were a shame to let this land by lease;
But, for thy world enjoying but this land,
Is it not more than shame to shame it so?
Landlord of England art thou now, not king.
Thy state of law is bondslave to the law,
And thou—

DUTCH:
Landheer van England zijt gij thans, niet koning;
Uw vorstlijk recht is nu de slaaf der wet

MORE:

Grandsire=Edward III
Deposing=Removing from the throne
Possessed=In possession of; posssessed by (an evil spirit)
Is bondslave=Has become slave to

Topics: wellbeing, failure, ruin

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
I do not bid the thunder-bearer shoot,
Nor tell tales of thee to high-judging Jove.
Mend when thou canst. Be better at thy leisure.
I can be patient. I can stay with Regan,
I and my hundred knights.

DUTCH:
Herzie je als het kan en jou dat schikt.
Ik heb geduld.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Thunder-bearer=Jove, the god of sky and thunder
Compleat:
Jove, chief god of the heathens=Jovus of Jupiter
Cloud-compelling Jove=De Bliksemende Jupiter

Topics: mercy, patience, wellbeing

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Sweet remembrancer!
Now, good digestion wait on appetite,
And health on both!

DUTCH:
Goede spijsvertering komt voort uit eetlust, en gezondheid uit beide./
Gij lieve maanster! — Nu, smake en wel bekome u allen ‘t maal!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Remembrancer=One who reminds
Compleat:
Remembrancer=Een Indachtig-maaker, waarschouwer
The Remembrancer of the first fruits=De Klerk der Eerstelingen, die alle bedingen en verdrag wegens Eerstelingen en Tienden aanschryft,

Topics: wellbeing, emotion and mood

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
So sick I am not, yet I am not well;
But not so citizen a wanton as
To seem to die ere sick. So please you, leave me.
Stick to your journal course. The breach of custom
Is breach of all. I am ill, but your being by me
Cannot amend me. Society is no comfort
To one not sociable. I am not very sick,
Since I can reason of it. Pray you trust me here—
I’ll rob none but myself—and let me die,
Stealing so poorly.

DUTCH:
Gezelschap helpt niet wie niet gezellig is;

Journal course=Daily routine
Citizen a wanton=City-bred (soft) “wanton” spoilt child or indulged and self-indulgent youth
Reason=Speak of it

Compleat:
Journal=Dag-register, dag-verhaal
Wanton=Onrein, vuil, ontuchtig
To grow wanton with too much prosperity=In voorspoed weeldrig worden

Topics: wellbeing, emotion and mood, custom, life

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CAPUCIUS
Noble lady,
First mine own service to your grace; the next,
The king’s request that I would visit you;
Who grieves much for your weakness, and by me
Sends you his princely commendations,
And heartily entreats you take good comfort.
KATHERINE
O my good lord, that comfort comes too late;
‘Tis like a pardon after execution:
That gentle physic, given in time, had cured me;
But now I am past an comforts here, but prayers.
How does his highness?

DUTCH:
O beste heer, die troost komt mij te laat;
Ze is als genade na voltrokken vonnis.

MORE:
Commendations=Good wishes, greetings
Physic=Medicine
Comfort=Cures
Compleat:
Commendation=Pryzing, aanpryzing, aanbeveling
Physick=Artseny, medicyn, geneesmiddel
To physick=Geneesmiddelen gebruiken, medicineeren
To comfort=Vertroosten, verquikken

Topics: wellbeing, remedy, time, death

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Lady Percy
CONTEXT:
Thy spirit within thee hath been so at war,
And thus hath so bestirred thee in thy sleep,
That beads of sweat have stood upon thy brow
Like bubbles in a late-disturbèd stream,
And in thy face strange motions have appeared,
Such as we see when men restrain their breath
On some great sudden hest. O, what portents are these?

DUTCH:
Uw geest in u was zoozeer bij den krijg,
En heeft u zoo in uwen slaap verhit,
Dat parels zweet u op het voorhoofd stonden,
Als blazen op een pas verwoeden stroom;

MORE:

Some great sudden hest=A sudden important command
Schmidt:
Soul=Represented as the seat of real, not only professed, sentiments
Hest=behest
CITED IN IRISH LAW:
Murtagh -v- Minister for Defence & Ors [2008] IEHC 292 (22 July 2008) /[2008] IEHC 292

Topics: madness, conflict, wellbeing, emotion and mood

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
True is it that we have seen better days
And have with holy bell been knolled to church,
And sat at good men’s feasts and wiped our eyes
Of drops that sacred pity hath engendered.
And therefore sit you down in gentleness,
And take upon command what help we have
That to your wanting may be ministered

DUTCH:
We hebben betere dagen gekend

MORE:
Shakespeare is credited with coining the phrase “seen better days” but it had been recorded previously in a play by Sir Thomas More (1590).
The phrase, which at the time referred to those who come on hard times, is still in use although it is now also to describe objects that are past their best.
Schmidt:
Minister to=Administer (medicines), to prescribe, to order

Topics: still in use, invented or popularised, wellbeing

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Infirmity doth still neglect all office
Whereto our health is bound. We are not ourselves
When nature, being oppressed, commands the mind
To suffer with the body. I’ll forbear,
And am fallen out with my more headier will
To take the indisposed and sickly fit
For the sound man.

DUTCH:
Wij zijn onszelf niet als
natuur ’t benauwd krijgt en de geest beveelt
te lijden met ons vlees.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Infirmity=Disease
Office= Duties, obligations
Compleat:
Office (part, or duty)=Plicht.
He did his office=Hy nam zyn ampt of plicht waar

Topics: wellbeing, debt/obligation, duty

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Gratiano
CONTEXT:
GRATIANO
Let me play the fool.
With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.
And let my liver rather heat with wine
Than my heart cool with mortifying groans.
Why should a man whose blood is warm within
Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster,
Sleep when he wakes, and creep into the jaundice
By being peevish?

DUTCH:

’k Wacht dartlend, lachend, rimplige’ ouderdom /
Laat mij maar rimpels krijgen van ‘t lachen en de vrolijkheid /
Laat de oude rimpels komen met gelach

MORE:
Jaundice was thought to be caused by excess choler ( one of the four humors)
Compleat:
Sooth=Zéker, voorwaar
Jaundice=De Geelzucht
Peevish=Kribbig, gémelyk, korsel, ligt geraakt.
Early 16c corsel (now ‘korselig’) (J. de Vries (1971), Nederlands Etymologisch Woordenboek, Leiden)

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Salarino
CONTEXT:
SALERIO
Your mind is tossing on the ocean,
There, where your argosies with portly sail,
Like signors and rich burghers on the flood—
Or, as it were, the pageants of the sea—
Do overpeer the petty traffickers
That curtsy to them, do them reverence
As they fly by them with their woven wings.
SOLANIO
Believe me, sir, had I such venture forth,
The better part of my affections would
Be with my hopes abroad. I should be still
Plucking the grass to know where sits the wind,
Peering in maps for ports and piers and roads.
And every object that might make me fear
Misfortune to my ventures out of doubt
Would make me sad.

DUTCH:
Uw geest wordt op den oceaan geslingerd,
Waar uw galjoenen, fier het zeil in top,
Als eed’len en grootburgers van de zee,
Door statigheid hun hoogen rang verkonden
En neerzien op de kleine handelslul,
Die needrig buigend hem begroeten, als
Zij langs hen vliegen met geweven vleug’len.

MORE:
Argosies=Large merchant ships
Portly=Stately, imposing.
Overpeer=Rise above, look down on
Trafficker=Merchant
Do reverence=accord respect
Compleat:
Portly=Deftig van gestatalte, wel gemaakt.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

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