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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Othello ACT/SCENE: 2.1 SPEAKER: Cassio CONTEXT: O, behold,
The riches of the ship is come on shore!
You men of Cyprus, let her have your knees.
Hail to thee, lady! And the grace of heaven,
Before, behind thee, and on every hand,
Enwheel thee round. DUTCH: Heil, vrouwe, en laat hemelse genade
u voor en achter en van alle kanten
omringen!
MORE:
Schmidt:
Enwheel=To encircle, surround, encompass Topics: civility

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
QUEEN ISABEL
Our gracious brother, I will go with them.
Haply a woman’s voice may do some good,
When articles too nicely urged be stood on.
KING HENRY
Yet leave our cousin Katherine here with us.
She is our capital demand, comprised
Within the fore-rank of our articles.

DUTCH:
Doorluchte broeder, ik wil met hen gaan.
Wellicht bewerkt een vrouwestem iets goeds,
Als eenige eisch te sterk wordt aangedrongen.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Haply=Perhaps
Capital=Chief, principal
Nicely=Putiliously, scrupulously
Forerank=Priority, first rank, front

Compleat:
Haply=Misschien
To be nice in something=Keurig

Topics: civility, manipulation, achievement

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
Who’s there, I say? How dare you thrust yourselves
Into my private meditations?
Who am I? ha?
NORFOLK
A gracious king that pardons all offences
Malice ne’er meant: our breach of duty this way
Is business of estate; in which we come
To know your royal pleasure.

DUTCH:
Wie is daar, zeg ik? Wat, verstout gij u
Mij in mijn peinzende eenzaamheid te storen?
Wie ben ik? ha!

MORE:
Thrust yourselves into=Disturb
Estate=State

Topics: civility, failure

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
ORLANDO
And so had I, but yet, for fashion sake, I thank you too for your society.
JAQUES
God be wi’ you. Let’s meet as little as we can.
ORLANDO
I do desire we may be better strangers.
JAQUES
I pray you mar no more trees with writing love songs in their barks.
ORLANDO
I pray you mar no more of my verses with reading them ill- favouredly.

DUTCH:
Ik hoop, dat wij meer en meer van elkaar vervreemden.

MORE:
Reading them ill-favouredly. See Sir John Harington’s Epigrams (1618)
‘Sextus, an ill reader’:
‘For shame poynt better, and pronounce it cleerer,
Or be no Reader, Sextus, be a Hearer’.
( Poynt= punctuate)

Topics: insult, relationship, civility

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
BENVOLIO
We talk here in the public haunt of men.
Either withdraw unto some private place,
And reason coldly of your grievances,
Or else depart. Here all eyes gaze on us.
MERCUTIO
Men’s eyes were made to look and let them gaze.
I will not budge for no man’s pleasure, I.

DUTCH:
Ik wijk van hier om niemands wil een haar.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Haunt = a “place much frequented”
Coldly = coolly, rationally
Shakespeare is said to have popularised use of the verb ‘to budge’, usually in a negative context to mean intransigence, refusal to change position. (See also Sly in Taming of the Shrew “I’ll not budge an inch”.)
Double negatives were common in Old English and weren’t a problem for Shakespeare (or Chaucer and other writers of the time). In fact, they weren’t condemned until the 18th century when grammarians declared that double negatives cancel each other out or amounted to an affirmative.

Topics: dispute, reason, civility

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
YORK
Whom have we here? Buckingham, to disturb me?
The king hath sent him, sure: I must dissemble.
BUCKINGHAM
York, if thou meanest well, I greet thee well.
YORK
Humphrey of Buckingham, I accept thy greeting.
Art thou a messenger, or come of pleasure?
BUCKINGHAM
A messenger from Henry, our dread liege,
To know the reason of these arms in peace;
Or why thou, being a subject as I am,
Against thy oath and true allegiance sworn,
Should raise so great a power without his leave,
Or dare to bring thy force so near the court.

DUTCH:
Zoo gij als vriend komt, York, dan groet ik vriendlijk.

MORE:

Dissemble=Assume a false appearance
Arms=Army
Dread=Greatly revered

Compleat:
To dissemble (conceal)=Bedekken, bewimpelen; veinzen, ontveinzen, verbloemen
Dread sovereign=Geduchte Vorst

Topics: appearance, deceit, civility, purpose, loyalty

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France,
Whose tongue more poisons than the adder’s tooth!
How ill-beseeming is it in thy sex
To triumph, like an Amazonian trull,
Upon their woes whom fortune captivates!
But that thy face is, visor-like, unchanging,
Made impudent with use of evil deeds,
I would assay, proud queen, to make thee blush.
To tell thee whence thou camest, of whom derived,
Were shame enough to shame thee, wert thou not
shameless.
Thy father bears the type of King of Naples,
Of both the Sicils and Jerusalem,
Yet not so wealthy as an English yeoman.
Hath that poor monarch taught thee to insult?
It needs not, nor it boots thee not, proud queen,
Unless the adage must be verified,
That beggars mounted run their horse to death.

DUTCH:
Maar, fiere koningin, het baat u niets,
Dan dat het spreekwoord waar blijkt: „Als een beed’laar
Te paard ooit komt, hij jaagt zijn rijdier dood.”

MORE:

Proverb: Set a beggar on horseback and he will ride a gallop (run his horse out of breath): newfound power will go to their heads

Ill-beseeming=Unbecoming, unattractive
Trull=A drab, lewd woman
Captivate=Subdue
Visor=(Vizor, Vizard): Mask
Impudent=Shameless
Assay=Try
Type=Title
Yeoman=Landowner
Needs not=Is unnecessary
Boots not=Is futile
Adage=Proverb

Compleat:
To beseem=Betaamen, voegen, passen
Trull=Een smots, snol
Captivate=Overmeesteren, gevangen neemen
Vizard=Een momaanzigt, mombakkus, masker
Impudent=Onbeschaamd
to assay=Beproeven, toetsen, onderstaan, keuren
Yeoman=Een welgegoed landman, een ryke boer, een Landjonker
It is to no boot=Het doet geen nut, het is te vergeefs
Adage=Spreekwoord

Topics: proverbs and idioms, appearance, civility, language, dignity

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Lancaster
CONTEXT:
LANCASTER
It was more of his courtesy than your deserving.
FALSTAFF
I know not. Here he is, and here I yield him. And I beseech
your Grace let it be booked with the rest of this day’s deeds
or, by the Lord, I will have it in a particular ballad else, with
mine own picture on the top on ’t, Colevile kissing my foot;
to the which course if I be enforced, if you do not all show
like gilt twopences to me, and I in the clear sky of fame o’ershine you as much as the full moon doth the cinders of the element (which show like pins’ heads to her), believe not the word of the noble. Therefore let me have right, and let desert mount.

DUTCH:
Dat was meer zijne hoffelijkheid dan uwe verdienste.

MORE:

Courtesy=good manners, good breeding; act or show of politeness
Booked=Recorded, documented
Particular ballad=Special ballad devoted to person or occasion
Gilt twopences=Gilded to give the appearance of a half a crown
Cinders of the element=Stars
Desert=Promise, worth, merit
Mount=Rise

Compleat:
Courtesy=Beleefdheid, hoflykheid,, eerbiedigheid; genyg, nyging; vriendelykheid
To book=Te boek stellen, boeken
Desert (from to deserve)=Verdienste, verdiende loon
Mount=Opklimmen, opstygen

Topics: civility, achievement

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Prospero
CONTEXT:
By providence divine.
Some food we had, and some fresh water, that
A noble Neapolitan, Gonzalo,
Out of his charity – who, being then appointed
Master of this design – did give us, with
Rich garments, linens, stuffs and necessaries,
Which since have steaded much; so of his gentleness,
Knowing I loved my books, he furnished me
From mine own library with volumes that
I prize above my dukedom.

DUTCH:
Ja, zijn goedheid,
Die wist, hoe ik mijn boeken minde, gaf
Uit mijne boekerij mij werken mede,
Die ‘k hooger stel dan heel mijn hertogdom

MORE:
Steaded much=Been very helpful (stood us in good stead)
Gentleness=Kindness
Compleat:
Gentleness=Zachtheid, zachtzinnigheid, leenigheid, behendigheid
The gentleness of his temper=De zachtheid van zyn temperament
To stead (do service)=Dienst doen
To be of no stead or to serve in no stead=Nergens in staat toe zyn, nergens toe deugen
Stand in good stead=Dienstelyk zyn, goeden dienst doen.

Topics: civility, learning/education, value

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Capulet
CONTEXT:
Therefore be patient. Take no note of him.
It is my will, the which if thou respect,
Show a fair presence and put off these frowns,
An ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.

DUTCH:
Wees vriendlijk; neen! toon op ‘t gelaat geen wrevel,
Want dat is iets, wat op een feest niet past.

MORE:
Ill-beseeming=unseemly, unbecoming
Semblance=show, outward appearance
Compleat:
To beseem=betaamen, voegen
Unbecoming=onbetaamelyk, niet voegend
Unbecomingness=Onbetaamelykheid, wanvoegelykheid

Topics: appearance, emotion and mood, civility

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
I would I had that corporal soundness now,
As when thy father and myself in friendship
First tried our soldiership! He did look far
Into the service of the time and was
Discipled of the bravest: he lasted long;
But on us both did haggish age steal on
And wore us out of act. It much repairs me
To talk of your good father. In his youth
He had the wit which I can well observe
To-day in our young lords; but they may jest
Till their own scorn return to them unnoted
Ere they can hide their levity in honour;
So like a courtier, contempt nor bitterness
Were in his pride or sharpness; if they were,
His equal had awaked them; and his honour.
Clock to itself, knew the true minute when
Exception bid him speak, and at this time
His tongue obeyed his hand: who were below him
He us’d as creatures of another place.
And bowed his eminent top to their low ranks.
Making them proud of his humility.
In their poor praise he humbled. Such a man
Might be a copy to these younger times,
Which, followed well, would demonstrate them now
But goers backward.

DUTCH:
Een man als hij kon onzen jong’ren tijd
Een voorbeeld zijn, dat, nagevolgd, zou toonen,
Hoe deze tijd teruggaat.

MORE:
Copy= Example
Equal=Equal ranking
Exception=Disapproval
Courtier=Paradigm of true courtesy
Used=Treated
Scorn=Derision
Unnoted=Ignored
Goers-backward=Regressives
Compleat:
Equal=Wedergade
Courtier=Hoveling
He made exception=Hy had er iets tegen te zeggen
To take exception=Zich over iets belgen

Topics: civility, life, age/experience, independence, order/society, respect, fashion/trends, understanding

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
The pox of such antic, lisping, affecting fantasticoes, these new tuners of accents! “By Jesu, a very good blade! A very tall man! A very good whore!” Why, is not this a lamentable thing, grandsire, that we should be thus afflicted with these strange flies, these fashion-mongers, these “pardon me’s,” who stand so much on the new form, that they cannot sit at ease on the old bench? Oh, their bones, their bones!

DUTCH:
Och, naar de maan met al die bespottelijke, lispelende,
gemaakte windbuilen, die nieuwe bauwers van brabbelwoorden!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Affecting=Using affectations
Fantasticoes (sometimes fantasmines)=Fantastic, coxcomical persons (fopppish, conceited)
Blade=Fencer; used as an emblem of youth
Fashion-monger=one who affects gentility (fashion-monging)
Tune=tune of the time (see Hamlet 5.2)
A pardon-me=One who is always excusing himself
Compleat:
Blade=Een Jonker, wittebroods kind
A fine blade=Een fraai Jongeling
To blade it=Den Jonker speelen
Pardon me=Vergeef het my
To pardon=Vergeeven, quytschelden
A pardon-monger=Die Aflaaten verkoopt

Topics: civility, appearance, custom, language

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Gonzalo
CONTEXT:
SEBASTIAN
You were kneeled to and importuned otherwise
By all of us, and the fair soul herself
Weighed between loathness and obedience, at
Which end o’ th’ beam should bow. We have lost your son,
I fear, forever. Milan and Naples have
More widows in them of this business’ making
Than we bring men to comfort them.
The fault’s your own.
ALONSO
So is the dearest o’ th’ loss.
GONZALO
My lord Sebastian,
The truth you speak doth lack some gentleness
And time to speak it in. You rub the sore
When you should bring the plaster.
SEBASTIAN
Very well.
ANTONIO
And most chirurgeonly.
GONZALO
It is foul weather in us all, good sir,
When you are cloudy.

DUTCH:
Mijn prins Sebastiaan, wat gij waars daar zegt,
Mist zachtheid en den juisten tijd voor de uiting;
Gij schrijnt de wond, die gij verbinden moest.

MORE:
Schmidt/Arden:
Importune (in the sense of ‘ask urgently and persistently’ usu. with a person as obj.)
Weighed=Considered, balanced (between loathness and obedience)
Loathness=Unwillingness, reluctance; repulsion, dislike
Dearest=Bitterest, heaviest, coming at a high price
Time=The appropriate time
Chirurgeonly=In the manner of a surgeon:
Compleat:
To importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen
Loathsomness=Walgelykheid
Chirurgery=De heelkunst, wondheelkunde
Chirurgion=een Heelmeester, wondheeler, wondarts. Beter ‘Surgeon’
Dear-bought experience=Een duurgekogte ondervinding

Topics: truth, language, civility, emotion and mood

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Gonzalo
CONTEXT:
If in Naples
I should report this now, would they believe me?
If I should say, I saw such islanders—
For, certes, these are people of the island—
Who, though they are of monstrous shape, yet note,
Their manners are more gentle-kind than of
Our human generation you shall find
Many—nay, almost any.

DUTCH:
En wis, dit zijn toch lieden van het eiland,
Die, schoon ook monsterachtig van gedaante,
Zoo lief’lijk , vriend’lijk waren in hun doen,
Als gij bij enk’len slechts van ‘t menschenras,
Ja, schier bij niemand vindt.

MORE:
Gentle-kind = courteous
For certes = certainly
Compleat:
Courteous (gentle, kind)=Beleefd, hoffelyk
Generation (or lineage)=Nakomelinschap, makroost

Topics: appearance, virtue, civility

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
There be some sports are painful, and their labour
Delight in them sets off. Some kinds of baseness
Are nobly undergone. And most poor matters
Point to rich ends. This my mean task
Would be as heavy to me as odious, but
The mistress which I serve quickens what’s dead
And makes my labours pleasures. Oh, she is
Ten times more gentle than her father’s crabbed,
And he’s composed of harshness. I must remove
Some thousands of these logs and pile them up,
Upon a sore injunction. My sweet mistress
Weeps when she sees me work, and says such baseness
Had never like executor. I forget,
But these sweet thoughts do even refresh my labours,
Most busiest when I do it.

DUTCH:
Vermaken zijn er, die vermoeien, ‘t zwoegen
Verhoogt den lust er van; soms wordt verneed’ring
Met eer verduurd en voert ook het geringste
Tot heerlijke uitkomst

MORE:
Baseness=Low rank manual labour
Mean=humble
Heavy=Sorrowful, grievous
Quickens=Enlivens
Sore injunction=Harsh command
Crabbed=Churlish, morose
Compleat:
Baseness=Laagheid, lafhartigheid; Geringheid
Mean=Gering, slecht
Heavy (sasd)=Droevig, verdrietig
The burden lay sore upon me=De last lag zwaar op my (of drukte my zeer)
Crabbed=Wrang, stuursch, kribbig, nors, korzel
A crabbed fellow=Een norse vent

Topics: work, status, civility, satisfaction, money

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
Prithee, fair youth,
Think us no churls, nor measure our good minds
By this rude place we live in. Well encountered!
’Tis almost night; you shall have better cheer
Ere you depart, and thanks to stay and eat it.—
Boys, bid him welcome

DUTCH:
Acht ons geen lomperds; schat ons zacht gemoed
Niet naar de woeste woning


Churl=Peasant, rude and ill-bred fellow
To measure=To judge

Compleat:
Churl=Een plompe boer; een vrek
Churlish=Woest, boersch, onbeschoft
To measure a thing by one’s own profit=Een zaak schatten naar het voordeel dat men ‘er van trekt
To measure other peoples corn by one’s own bushel=Een ander by zich zelven afmeeten

Topics: civility, order/society, appearance, value, judgment, poverty and wealth

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
Such a one is a natural philosopher. Wast ever in court, shepherd?
CORIN
No, truly.
TOUCHSTONE
Then thou art damned.
CORIN
Nay, I hope.
TOUCHSTONE
Truly, thou art damned, like an ill-roasted egg, all on one side.
CORIN
For not being at court? Your reason.

DUTCH:
Waarachtig, gij wordt gebraden, evenals een slecht gebraden ei, aldoor aan éen kant.

MORE:

Topics: insult, order/society, status, civility

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
What doth Gravity out of his bed at midnight? Shall I give him his answer?

DUTCH:
Wat doet de deftigheid te middernacht uit haar bed? Zal ik hem te woord staan?

MORE:
Schmidt
Gravity=Dignity, solemnity of deportment or character, venerableness
Compleat:
Gravity=Deftigheyd, Stemmigheyd, Ernsthaftigheyd, staataigheyd

Topics: civility, authority

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Edmund
CONTEXT:
What you have charged me with, that have I done,
And more, much more; the time will bring it out.
‘Tis past, and so am I. But what art thou
That hast this fortune on me? If thou’rt noble,
I do forgive thee.
EDGAR
Let’s exchange charity.
I am no less in blood than thou art, Edmond.
If more, the more th’hast wronged me.
My name is Edgar, and thy father’s son.
The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices
Make instruments to plague us.
The dark and vicious place where thee he got
Cost him his eyes.

DUTCH:
Al wat gij mij verweet, ik heb ‘t gedaan,
En meer, veel meer; de tijd zal ‘t openbaren;
‘t Is al voorbij, ik ook. Maar wie zijt gij,
Die mij versloegt ? Zijt gij van adel, dan
Vergeef ik u.

MORE:
Schmidt;
Charity=That disposition of heart which inclines men to think favourably of their fellow-men, and to do them good.

Topics: blame, offence, mercy, civility, fate/destiny, status

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: First Servingman
CONTEXT:
FIRST SERVINGMAN
When good manners shall lie all in one or two men’s hands, and they unwashed too, ’tis a foul thing.
PETER
Away with the joint-stools, remove the court-cupboard, look to the plate. Good thou, save me a piece of marchpane, and, as thou loves me, let the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell.—Antony and Potpan!

DUTCH:
Als het voor de netheid aankomt op een paar menschenhanden,
en die zijn bovendien ongewasschen, dan ziet het er treurig uit.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Court-cupboard (cubbert, cubbord)=movable display closet or buffet
Marchpane=marzipan. Do they
Compleat:
Joint-stool=Een zitbankje, schabelletje

Topics: civility, appearance, custom

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
I am so full of businesses, I cannot answer thee
acutely. I will return perfect courtier; in the
which, my instruction shall serve to naturalize
thee, so thou wilt be capable of a courtier’s
counsel and understand what advice shall thrust upon
thee; else thou diest in thine unthankfulness, and
thine ignorance makes thee away: farewell. When
thou hast leisure, say thy prayers; when thou hast
none, remember thy friends; get thee a good husband,
and use him as he uses thee; so, farewell.

DUTCH:
Als gij tijd hebt, zeg dan uwe gebeden op, en hebt gij dien niet, denk dan aan uwe vrienden.

MORE:
Answer thee acutely=Give a witty response
“None” believed by some to be a misprint for “money”.
Courtier=Paradigm of true courtesy
Use=Treat
Makes thee away=Finishes you off
Compleat:
Leisurably=By ledigen tyd
Courtier=Hoveling

Topics: marriage, friendship, loyalty, civility

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
O sir, we quarrel in print, by the book, as you have books for good manners. I will name you the degrees. The first, the Retort Courteous; the second, the Quip Modest; the third, the Reply Churlish; the fourth, the Reproof Valiant; the fifth, the Countercheck Quarrelsome; the sixth, the Lie with Circumstance; the seventh, the Lie Direct. All these you may avoid but the Lie Direct; and you may avoid that, too, with an ‘if’. I knew when seven justices could not take up a quarrel, but when the parties were met themselves, one of them thought but of an ‘if’, as ‘If you said so, then I said so’, and they shook hands and swore brothers. Your ‘if’ is the only peacemaker; much virtue in ‘if’.

DUTCH:
Zoo’n „indien” is de ware vredestichter; ontzachlijk
krachtig dat „indien”!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Quarrel=To wrangle, to seek occasion of a fray, to pick a q+C68:G68uarrel.
Met=Had come together
Peace-maker=One who composes differences

“O Sir, we quarrel in print:: Ref. Fleming, A Panoplie of Epistles (1576), 357: Considering that whatsoever is uttered in such men’s hearing, must be done in print, as we say in our common proverb.

Burgersdijk notes:
Door een logenstraffing, zevenmaal herhaald. Hier en in het volgende wordt gezinspeeld op een boek, dat in 1595 in Londen werd uitgegeven, van Vincentio Saviolo, een schermmeester, waarschijnlijk uit Padua afkomstig en door Essex begunstigd. Het heet: „Vincentio Saviolo his Practise. In two Bookes. The first intreating of the use of the Rapier and Dagger. The second of honour and honourable Quarrels.” Van het tweede deel zegt de schrijver: A discourse most necessarie for all gentlemen that have in regard their honours, touching the giving and receiving of the Lie, where upon the Duello and the Combats in divers sortes doth insue, and many other inconveniences, for lack only of the trite Knowledge of honour and the contrary and the right understanding of wordes. Onder de hoofdstukken vindt men o. a.: What the reason is that the portie unto whom the lye is given ought to become Challenger: and of the nature of Lies; — Of the manner and diversitie of Lies; — Of Lies certaine; — Of conditionall Lies, enz.
Hier en daar ontleent Toetssteen het een en ander woordelijk uit dit boek; zoo leest men in het laatstgenoemd kapittel: „Conditionall lyes be such as are given conditionally; as if a man should saie or write these wordes: If thou hast saide that 1 have offered my Lord abuse, thou lyest; or if thou saiest so hereafter, thou shalt lye. Of these kind of lyes given in this manner often arise much contention in wordes whereof no sure conclusion can arise.” — Vandaar zegt Toetssteen dan ook „Ons twisten gaat naar de boeken”; er staat: in print, by the book: ,,zooals ‘t gedrukt is, naar het boek.”

Topics: law, language, civility, learning/education, dispute, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
DUKE SENIOR
Art thou thus boldened, man, by thy distress
Or else a rude despiser of good manners,
That in civility thou seem’st so empty?
ORLANDO
You touched my vein at first. The thorny point
Of bare distress hath ta’en from me the show
Of smooth civility, yet am I inland bred
And know some nurture. But forbear, I say.
He dies that touches any of this fruit
Till I and my affairs are answerèd.
JAQUES
An you will not be answered with reason, I must die.
DUKE SENIOR
What would you have? Your gentleness shall force
More than your force move us to gentleness.

DUTCH:
Doch vriend’lijkheid dwingt meer,
Dan ooit uw dwang tot vriend’lijkheid ons stemt.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb of the time: “There is a great force hidden in a sweet command” (1581).
Schmidt:
Empty: void, destitute; followed by in: “that in civility thou seemest so e.”
Vein=Disposition, temper, humour
Bare distress=A quibble
Inland: a word of a very vague signification, not so much denoting remoteness from the sea or the frontier, as a seat of peace and peaceful civilization; (perhaps opposed to mountainous districts as the seats of savage barbarousness and meaning the flat country)
Nurture=Good breeding, humanity

Topics: proverbs and idioms, order/society, language, civility, learning/education

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