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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Macbeth ACT/SCENE: 2.2 SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth CONTEXT: I hear a knocking
At the south entry. Retire we to our chamber.
A little water clears us of this deed.
How easy is it, then! Your constancy
Hath left you unattended. DUTCH: Een weinig waters spoelt die daad ons af MORE: CITED IN US LAW:
State v. Shanahan, 404 A.2d 975 (Me. 1979)(Wemick, J.)
Schmidt:
Constancy=Firmness of mind (purpose, resolve)
Compleat:
Constancy=Standvastigheid, volharding, bestendigheid Topics: guilt, cited in law, conscience, offence, evidence, purpose

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: First Gentleman
CONTEXT:
FIRST GENTLEMAN
The same.
All these accused him strongly; which he fain
Would have flung from him, but, indeed, he could not:
And so his peers, upon this evidence,
Have found him guilty of high treason. Much
He spoke, and learnedly, for life; but all
Was either pitied in him or forgotten.
SECOND GENTLEMAN
After all this, how did he bear himself?

DUTCH:
Die allen klaagden zwaar hem aan; hij wilde
Dit van zich schudden, maar vermocht het niet.
Zoo vonden dan zijn pairs op hun getuig’nis
Aan hoogverraad hem schuldig

MORE:
Fain=Gladly, willingly; always joined with would; followed by a clause
Flung=Thrown off, denied
Compleat:
Fain=Gaern
Foung=Geworpen, gesmeeten

Topics: evidence, defence

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
Out of the bowels of the harmless earth,
Which many a good tall fellow had destroyed
So cowardly, and but for these vile guns
He would himself have been a soldier.
This bald unjointed chat of his, my lord,
I answered indirectly, as I said,
And I beseech you, let not his report
Come current for an accusation
Betwixt my love and your high Majesty.

DUTCH:
En ik bezweer u, dat, wat hij bericht,
Nooit als een aanklacht tusschen mijne liefde
En uwe hooge majesteit zich dring’!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Bald=Void of reason, unfounded
Unjointed=incoherent
Tall=stout, sturdy, lusty, spirited
Indirectly=Not in a straight course, by second hand, not in express terms
Current= generally received, of full value, sterling, having currency (Come current as=have currency, be accepted as)
Compleat:
Current. The current of most writers=Het algemeen gevoelen van de meeste Schryvers.

Topics: loyalty, merit, evidence, value, perception, judgment

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
I hope I dream,
For so I thought I was a cave-keeper
And cook to honest creatures. But ’tis not so.
’Twas but a bolt of nothing, shot at nothing,
Which the brain makes of fumes. Our very eyes
Are sometimes like our judgments, blind. Good faith,
I tremble still with fear; but if there be
Yet left in heaven as small a drop of pity
As a wren’s eye, feared gods, a part of it!

DUTCH:
O, groote goden,
Is boven nog erbarming, slechts een drup,
Als ‘t oog der grasmusch, schenkt me een deel er van!


Schmidt:
A fume=A delusion, a phantasm, anything hindering, like a mist, the function of the brain

Compleat:
The glory of mortals is but a fume=De eerre der stervelingen is maar rook
To be in a fume=In een woede zyn

Topics: pity, imagination, madness, evidence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: First Lord
CONTEXT:
SECOND LORD
Hath the count all this intelligence?
FIRST LORD
Ay, and the particular confirmations, point from
point, so to the full arming of the verity.
SECOND LORD
I am heartily sorry that he’ll be glad of this.
FIRST LORD
How mightily sometimes we make us comforts of our
losses!
SECOND LORD
And how mightily some other times we drown our gain
in tears! The great dignity that his valour hath
here acquired for him shall at home be encountered
with a shame as ample.

DUTCH:
Ja en ook de bijzondere bewijzen, stuk voor stuk, zoodat
de waarheid met alle zekerheid is toegerust.

MORE:
Intelligence=Information
Point from point=Point by point
Arming=Reinforcement, strengthening (against attack)
Dignity=Honour
Encountered=Challenged, matched
Compleat:
Armed=Gewapend, toegerust
Dignity=Waardigheid
Verity=Waarheyd

Topics: evidence, truth, justification

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Sergeant
CONTEXT:
Sirs, take your places and be vigilant:
If any noise or soldier you perceive
Near to the walls, by some apparent sign
Let us have knowledge at the court of guard.

DUTCH:
Hier, mannen, op uw posten, en weest waakzaam.
Ontwaart gij een gedruis of een soldaat
Nabij den wal, zoo geeft door eenig teeken
Ons in het wachthuis fluks bericht er van.

MORE:
Burgersdijk notes:
Hier, mannen, enz. Wat Sh. hier van Orleans vermeldt, wordt door Holinshed van de inneming der stad Mans verhaald.

Topics: evidence

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CAMPEIUS
Put your main cause into the King’s protection.
He’s loving and most gracious. ’Twill be much
Both for your honour better and your cause,
For if the trial of the law o’ertake you,
You’ll part away disgraced.
WOLSEY
He tells you rightly.
QUEEN KATHERINE
You tell me what you wish for both: my ruin.
Is this your Christian counsel? Out upon you!
Heaven is above all yet; there sits a judge
That no king can corrupt.
CAMPEIUS
Your rage mistakes us.
QUEEN KATHARINE
The more shame for ye: holy men I thought ye,
Upon my soul, two reverend cardinal virtues;
But cardinal sins and hollow hearts I fear ye:
Mend ’em, for shame, my lords. Is this your comfort?
The cordial that ye bring a wretched lady,
A woman lost among ye, laugh’d at, scorn’d?
I will not wish ye half my miseries;
I have more charity: but say, I warn’d ye;
Take heed, for heaven’s sake, take heed, lest at once
The burthen of my sorrows fall upon ye

DUTCH:
Gij beiden, wat gij wenscht, mijn ondergang.
Is dit uw raad als christen? foei! Nog is er
Een hemel, waar een rechter, door geen koning
Ooit om te koopen, troont!

MORE:
Part away=Leave
Rage mistakes=Anger causes you to misjudge
Cardinal virtues=Alllusion to the four ‘cardinal’ virtues (prudence, justice, courage and temperance)
Cardinal sins=Allusion to the seven ‘cardinal’ sins (envy, gluttony, greed/avarice, lust, pride, sloth, and wrath)
Cordial=Tonic
Compleat:
Rage=Raazerny, woede, dulheyd
Mistake=Misvatting
Cardinal virtues=De vier hoofd-deugden, als Wysheyd, Maatigheyd, Gerechtigheyd en Dapperheyd
Cordial=Hardsterking

Topics: honour, dispute, anger, innocence, evidence

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
No, by mine honour, but I was bid to come for you.
ROSALIND
Where learned you that oath, fool?
TOUCHSTONE
Of a certain knight that swore by his honour they were good pancakes, and swore by his honour the mustard was naught. Now, I’ll stand to it, the pancakes were naught and the mustard was good, and yet was not the knight forsworn.
CELIA
How prove you that in the great heap of your knowledge?
ROSALIND
Ay, marry, now unmuzzle your wisdom.
TOUCHSTONE
Stand you both forth now: stroke your chins and swear by your beards that I am a knave.

DUTCH:
Hoe kunt gij dit uit den rijken schat van uw geleerdheid
bewijzen ?

MORE:
Schmidt:
To Forswear=To swear falsely, commit perjury
Unmuzzle=Free from restraint
Compleat:
To forswear one’s self=Eenen valschen eed doen, meyneedig zyn
To forswear a thing=Zweeren dat iets zo niet is

Topics: honour, promise, evidence, intellect

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
And often, to our comfort, shall we find
The sharded beetle in a safer hold
Than is the full-wing’d eagle. O, this life
Is nobler than attending for a check,
Richer than doing nothing for a bauble,
Prouder than rustling in unpaid-for silk:
Such gain the cap of him that makes ’em fine,
Yet keeps his book uncross’d: no life to ours.
GUIDERIUS (as Polydor)
Out of your proof you speak. We poor unfledged
Have never winged from view o’ th’ nest, nor know not
What air ’s from home. Haply this life is best
If quiet life be best, sweeter to you
That have a sharper known, well corresponding
With your stiff age; but unto us it is
A cell of ignorance, traveling abed,
A prison for a debtor that not dares
To stride a limit.

DUTCH:
BELARIUS
(…) O, dit leven
Is eed’ler dan als hoveling te dienen,
Waarvoor verwijten vaak het loon zijn; rijker
Dan dat men voor een handvol gouds zich laat
Omkoopen en toch niets doet; trotscher ook,
Dan dat men ruischt in onbetaalde zijde,
Waarvoor wie ‘t prachtkleed levert, buigt, en toch
De schuld niet schrapt: geen leven zooals ‘t onze.
GUIDERIUS
Gij spreekt uit uw ervaring; maar wij, armen,
Wij vlogen nooit van ‘t nest nog weg, en weten
Volstrekt nog niet, hoe elders wel de lucht is.
Dit leven kan het beste zijn, wanneer
De rust het hoogste goed is, en voor u,
Die harder, scherper leven hebt gekend,
Veel zoeter; ‘t strookt ook niet uw strammer leeftijd;


Attending=Dancing attendance
Check=Rebuke
Sharded=Having scaly wings
Gain the cap=Have someone (in this case, the tailor) doff their cap to them
Book uncrossed=Debts not struck out
Proof=Experience

Compleat:
Attendance=Opwachting, oppassing, behartiging; Een stoet van oppasssers, hofgezin, dienstbooden
To dance attendance=Lang te vergeefsch wagten
To cross out=Doorstreepen, doorhaalen
Proof (mark or testimony)=Getuigenis

Topics: age/experience, life, evidence, debt/obligation, authority

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
SOMERSET
If York, with all his far-fet policy,
Had been the regent there instead of me,
He never would have stay’d in France so long.
YORK
No, not to lose it all, as thou hast done:
I rather would have lost my life betimes
Than bring a burthen of dishonour home
By staying there so long till all were lost.
Show me one scar character’d on thy skin:
Men’s flesh preserved so whole do seldom win.

DUTCH:
Toon mij éen wond, éen schram, die tuigt van moed;
Slechts zelden wint, wie zoo zijn vleesch behoedt.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Far-fet=(far-fetched): Layered, deep, cunning (without modern connotation of unlikely)
Betimes=Early, at an early hour
Burthen=Burden
Charactered=Written, inscribed, marked

Compleat:
Betimes=Bytyds, vroeg
Far-fetched=Ver gehaald
Burden=Last, pak, vracht
Character=Een merk, merkteken, letter, afbeeldsel, uitdruksel, print, stempel, uitgedruktbeeld, uitbeelding

Topics: age/experience, appearance, failure, evidence

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Westmorland
CONTEXT:
WESTMORELAND
Mowbray, you overween to take it so.
This offer comes from mercy, not from fear.
For, lo, within a ken our army lies,
Upon mine honor, all too confident
To give admittance to a thought of fear.
Our battle is more full of names than yours,
Our men more perfect in the use of arms,
Our armor all as strong, our cause the best.
Then reason will our hearts should be as good.
Say you not then our offer is compelled.
MOWBRAY
Well, by my will, we shall admit no parley.
WESTMORELAND
That argues but the shame of your offence.
A rotten case abides no handling.

DUTCH:
Dit tuigt slechts van de schendigheid uws doens;
Een etterbuil laat geen betasting toe.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Overween=To be arrogant or presumptuous
Within a ken=In sight, within eyeshot
Parley=A conversation or conference tending to come to an agreement
Admit no parley=We will not negotiate
A ken=Boundary of sight

Compleat:
Overwean or overween=Al te veel van zich zelven houden, zich vleijen
Parley=Een gesprek over voorwaarden, onderhandeling, gesprekhouding
Beyond the ken (or keen) of vulgar understanding=Het begrip des gemeenen volks te boven

Topics: evidence, dispute, still in use, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Plantagenet
CONTEXT:
PLANTAGENET
Tut, tut, here is a mannerly forbearance:
The truth appears so naked on my side
That any purblind eye may find it out.
SOMERSET
And on my side it is so well apparell’d,
So clear, so shining and so evident
That it will glimmer through a blind man’s eye.
PLANTAGENET
Since you are tongue-tied and so loath to speak,
In dumb significants proclaim your thoughts:
Let him that is a true-born gentleman
And stands upon the honour of his birth,
If he suppose that I have pleaded truth,
From off this brier pluck a white rose with me.

DUTCH:
Aan mijne zijde is zij zoo welgekleed;
Zoo helder, glansrijk, zoo volkomen duid’lijk,
Dat zij een blinde zelfs in ‘t oog moet stralen.

MORE:
Mannerly=Polite
Forbearance=Reserve
Purblind=Partially blind
Apparelled=Dressed up
Dumb significants=Mute signs

Compleat:
Purblind=Stikziende
Signification=Beeteknis, betekening, beduidenis, beduidsel
To forbear (let alone)=Staan laaten, nalaaten, vermyden

Topics: dispute, truth, merit, evidence

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
Let him be but testimonied in his own
bringings-forth, and he shall appear to the
envious a scholar, a statesman and a soldier.
Therefore you speak unskilfully: or if your
knowledge be more it is much darkened in your malice.

DUTCH:
Daarom, gij spreekt zonder eenig inzicht; of, als gij er meer kennis van hebt, dan is die door uwe boosaardigheid zeer verduisterd.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Testimonied=Attested, witnessed, proved by testimony
Compleat:
Testimony=Getuigen. To bear testimony against one=Tegen iemand getuigen
In testimony whereof=Ten bewyze daar van

Topics: skill/talent, learning/education, evidence, language

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
What shall I say to thee, Lord Scroop, thou cruel,
Ingrateful, savage, and inhuman creature?
Thou that didst bear the key of all my counsels,
That knew’st the very bottom of my soul,
That almost mightst have coined me into gold,
Wouldst thou have practiced on me for thy use—
May it be possible that foreign hire
Could out of thee extract one spark of evil
That might annoy my finger? ‘Tis so strange
That, though the truth of it stands off as gross
As black and white, my eye will scarcely see it.
Treason and murder ever kept together
As two yoke-devils sworn to either’s purpose,
Working so grossly in a natural cause
That admiration did not whoop at them.

DUTCH:
Het is zoo vreemd,
Dat, schoon de waarheid scherp en duid’lijk afsteek
Als wit en zwart, mijn oog ze nauw’lijks zien wil.

MORE:

Use=Advantage
Grossly=Palpably, evidently
Admiration=Astonishment
Key=Control, mastery or knowledge of the inner workings

Compleat:
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbebouwen
You grossly mistake my meaning=Gy vergist u grootelyks omtrent myn meening
Admiration=Verwondering

Topics: evidence, good and bad, deceit, truth, conspiracy, loyalty

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
BRABANTIO
(…) It is a judgment maimed and most imperfect
That will confess perfection so could err.
Against all rules of nature, and must be driven
To find out practices of cunning hell
Why this should be. I therefore vouch again
That with some mixtures powerful o’er the blood
Or with some dram, conjured to this effect,
He wrought upon her.
DUKE
To vouch this is no proof,
Without more wider and more overt test
Than these thin habits and poor likelihoods
Of modern seeming do prefer against him.
FIRST SENATOR
But, Othello, speak.
Did you by indirect and forcèd courses
Subdue and poison this young maid’s affections?
Or came it by request and such fair question
As soul to soul affordeth?

DUTCH:
Betuigd is niet bewezen,
Tenzij gij beter gronden hebt, meer klemmend,
Dan ‘t los vermoeden, dat, met krachtloos uitzicht,
En dun gekleed, nu optreedt tegen hem.

MORE:

Proverb: Accusation is no proof

Vouch again=Reaffirm expressly
Wider=Fuller
Test=Testimony, evidence
Thin habits=Scant, insubstantial exterior
Poor=Tenuous
Likelihood=Circumstantial evidence, somethng from which inferences may be drawn, indication, sign
Indirect=Underhand
Forced=Constrained, unnatural, false (against the will of)
Modern seeming=Common assumption
Compleat:
Testable=Die volgens de rechten getuigen mag
Indirect=Niet rechts weegs, zydelings. Indirect means=Slinksche middelen
Directly or indirectly=Middelyk of onmiddelyk, voor de vuist of heimelyk

Topics: proverbs and idioms, nature, error, evidence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
She never saw it.
BERTRAM
She never saw it.
KING
Thou speak’st it falsely, as I love mine honour;
And makest conjectural fears to come into me
Which I would fain shut out. If it should prove
That thou art so inhuman,—’twill not prove so;—
And yet I know not: thou didst hate her deadly,
And she is dead; which nothing, but to close
Her eyes myself, could win me to believe,
More than to see this ring. Take him away.
My fore-past proofs, howe’er the matter fall,
Shall tax my fears of little vanity,
Having vainly fear’d too little. Away with him!
We’ll sift this matter further.

DUTCH:
Hoe ‘t loope, wat ik vroeger van hem zag,
Spreekt van lichtvaardigheid mijn argwaan vrij ,
Want al te arg’loos was ik. Weg met hem!
Wij onderzoeken ‘t nader.

MORE:
As I love mine honour=Upon my honour
Conjectural=Based on conjecture, guesswork
Fain=Gladly
Tax=Charge, accuse
Vanity=Foolishness
Fore-past=Antecedent
Compleat:
Fain=Gaern
Conjectural=Op gissing steunende
Vanity=Ydelheid
To tax=Beschuldigen

Topics: truth, honesty, evidence

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
I never came within these abbey walls,
Nor ever didst thou draw thy sword on me.
I never saw the chain, so help me heaven,
And this is false you burden me withal.
DUKE
Why, what an intricate impeach is this!
I think you all have drunk of Circe’s cup.
If here you housed him, here he would have been.

DUTCH:
Dit is een zaak vol wondervreemde raadsels!
Het schijnt, gij allen dronkt uit Circe’s nap.
Waar’ hij hier ingevlucht, hij zou er zijn;
En waar’ hij dol, hij pleitte niet zoo kalm

MORE:
Circe=A sorceress in Greek mythology; in Homer’s Odyssey, Circe transforms Odysseus’s men into pigs by giving them a magic potion.
Impeach=Accusation, reproach

Compleat:
To impeach=Betichten, beschuldigen, aanklagen
To impeach (or oppose) the truth of a thing=Zich tegen de waarheid van een zaak aankanten

Topics: law/legal, appearance, evidence, madness

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CAMPEIUS
Put your main cause into the King’s protection.
He’s loving and most gracious. ’Twill be much
Both for your honour better and your cause,
For if the trial of the law o’ertake you,
You’ll part away disgraced.
WOLSEY
He tells you rightly.
QUEEN KATHERINE
You tell me what you wish for both: my ruin.
Is this your Christian counsel? Out upon you!
Heaven is above all yet; there sits a judge
That no king can corrupt.
CAMPEIUS
Your rage mistakes us.
QUEEN KATHARINE
The more shame for ye: holy men I thought ye,
Upon my soul, two reverend cardinal virtues;
But cardinal sins and hollow hearts I fear ye:
Mend ’em, for shame, my lords. Is this your comfort?
The cordial that ye bring a wretched lady,
A woman lost among ye, laugh’d at, scorn’d?
I will not wish ye half my miseries;
I have more charity: but say, I warn’d ye;
Take heed, for heaven’s sake, take heed, lest at once
The burthen of my sorrows fall upon ye

DUTCH:
Gij beiden, wat gij wenscht, mijn ondergang.
Is dit uw raad als christen? foei! Nog is er
Een hemel, waar een rechter, door geen koning
Ooit om te koopen, troont!

MORE:
Part away=Leave
Rage mistakes=Anger causes you to misjudge
Cardinal virtues=Alllusion to the four ‘cardinal’ virtues (prudence, justice, courage and temperance)
Cardinal sins=Allusion to the seven ‘cardinal’ sins (envy, gluttony, greed/avarice, lust, pride, sloth, and wrath)
Cordial=Tonic
Compleat:
Rage=Raazerny, woede, dulheyd
Mistake=Misvatting
Cardinal virtues=De vier hoofd-deugden, als Wysheyd, Maatigheyd, Gerechtigheyd en Dapperheyd
Cordial=Hardsterking

Topics: honour, dispute, anger, innocence, evidence

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