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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry V ACT/SCENE: 3.7 SPEAKER: Orleans CONTEXT: CONSTABLE
By my faith, sir, but it is; never anybody saw it but his lackey. ‘Tis a hooded valour, and when it appears, it will bate.
ORLÉANS
Ill will never said well.
CONSTABLE
I will cap that proverb with “There is flattery in friendship.”
ORLÉANS
And I will take up that with “Give the devil his due.”
CONSTABLE
Well placed; there stands your friend for the devil. Have at the very eye of that proverb with “A pox of the devil.”
ORLÉANS
You are the better at proverbs, by how much “A fool’s bolt is soon shot.”
CONSTABLE
You have shot over.
ORLÉANS
‘Tis not the first time you were overshot. DUTCH: Gij zijt in spreekwoorden de baas, en waarom? Een
narrenpijl is ras verschoten./
De pijl van een dwaas is spoedig afgeschoten
MORE:
Proverb: Ill will never speaks well (1566)
Proverb: There is flattery in friendship
A series of proverbs in this quote. “Give the devil his due”, “There is flattery in friendship”, “A pox of the devil” and “A fool’s bolt is soon shot”.

A fool’s bolt is soon shot meaning fools act rashly, alluding to bowmen in battle. Good soldiers take aim, foolish soldiers shoot at random.
Lackey (or lacquey)=Footboy, servant
Hooded valour and it will bate=Allusion to falconry; falcons are kept hooded when at rest and when unhooded they ‘bait’ (beat or flap the wings).

Compleat:
Lackey (or footman)=een Lyfknecht, lakey
Hooded=Gekaperd, bekaperd, gekapt
Overshoot=Voorbyschieten.
To overshoot the mark=Het doel voorbyschieten, voorby ‘t merk schieten
I have overshot myself=Ik heb my vergist, het is my ontschooten Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, haste, caution

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
HELEN
What’s his will else?
PAROLLES
That you will take your instant leave o’ the king
And make this haste as your own good proceeding,
Strengthen’d with what apology you think
May make it probable need.
HELEN
What more commands he?
PAROLLES
That, having this obtain’d, you presently
Attend his further pleasure.
HELEN
In every thing I wait upon his will.

DUTCH:
Dat gij den koning onverwijld vaarwel zegt,
En dezen spoed, als ging die van u nit,
Met zulke gronden stevigt, dat hij werk’lijk
Noodzaak’lijk blijke .

MORE:
Instant=Immediate
Make=Make out to be
Probable need=The need for haste probable
Proceeding=Course of action
Compleat:
Instant=Aanhoudende, dringende
Proceeding=Handling

Topics: haste, reason, justification

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Hecate
CONTEXT:
He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
His hopes ‘bove wisdom, grace, and fear.
And you all know, security
Is mortals’ chiefest enemy.

DUTCH:
Zorgeloosheid is de voornaamste vijand van stervelingen./
En ‘t is de waan van veiligheid, Die wis verderf den mensch bereidt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Security=carelessness, want of caution, confidence
Compleat:
Security=Zorgeloosheyd

Topics: hope/optimism, ambition, haste, , wisdom, security

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
God in thy good cause make thee prosperous!
Be swift like lightning in the execution;
And let thy blows, doubly redoubled,
Fall like amazing thunder on the casque
Of thy adverse pernicious enemy:
Rouse up thy youthful blood, be valiant and live.

DUTCH:
God geve u voorspoed bij uw goede zaak!
Wees plotsling, als de bliksem, met uw wapen

MORE:

Proverb: As swift as lightning

Casque=Head-piece, helmet
Redoubled=Repeated often
Adverse=On the opposing side (in combat)
Pernicious=Mischievous, malicious, wicked

Compleat:
Redouble=Verdubbelen, herdubbelen
Pernicious=Schadelyk, verderflyk

Topics: haste, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
Methinks I am a prophet new inspired
And thus expiring do foretell of him:
His rash fierce blaze of riot cannot last,
For violent fires soon burn out themselves;
Small showers last long, but sudden storms are short;
He tires betimes that spurs too fast betimes;
With eager feeding food doth choke the feeder:
Light vanity, insatiate cormorant,
Consuming means, soon preys upon itself.

DUTCH:
Zijn dol en wulpsch geflakker kan niet duren,
Want ieder heftig vuur brandt schielijk uit

MORE:

Proverb: Nothing violent can be permanent
Proverb: Untimeous [untimely] spurring spoils the steed

Expiring=(a) Dying; (b) Expiration
Riot=Dissolute behaviour
Betimes=Early, at an early hour

Compleat:
Expiration=Eindiging, uitgang, verloop, uitblaazing van den laatsten adem
To expire=Den geest geeven, sterven
To riot=Optrekken, rinkinken, pypestellen
Betimes=Bytyds,vroeg

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, fate/destiny, haste

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
An end, sir; to your business. Give Helen this,
And urge her to a present answer back:
Commend me to my kinsmen and my son:
This is not much.
CLOWN
Not much commendation to them.
COUNTESS
Not much employment for you: you understand me?
CLOWN
Most fruitfully: I am there before my legs.
COUNTESS
Haste you again.

DUTCH:
Recht vruchtdragend ; ik ben lang voor mijn beenen daar.

MORE:
Commend me=Send my compliments
Not much employment=Not an onerous task

Topics: haste

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
I, that have neither pity, love, nor fear.
Indeed, ’tis true that Henry told me of;
For I have often heard my mother say
I came into the world with my legs forward:
Had I not reason, think ye, to make haste,
And seek their ruin that usurp’d our right?
The midwife wonder’d and the women cried
‘O, Jesus bless us, he is born with teeth!’
And so I was; which plainly signified
That I should snarl and bite and play the dog.
Then, since the heavens have shaped my body so,
Let hell make crook’d my mind to answer it.
I have no brother, I am like no brother;
And this word ‘love,’ which graybeards call divine,
Be resident in men like one another
And not in me: I am myself alone.
Clarence, beware; thou keep’st me from the light:
But I will sort a pitchy day for thee;
For I will buz abroad such prophecies
That Edward shall be fearful of his life,
And then, to purge his fear, I’ll be thy death.
King Henry and the prince his son are gone:
Clarence, thy turn is next, and then the rest,
Counting myself but bad till I be best.
I’ll throw thy body in another room
And triumph, Henry, in thy day of doom.

DUTCH:
O, hoed u, Clarence, gij staat mij in ‘t licht;
Pikzwarte dagen zal ik u verwekken;
Want profecieën zal ik gonzen doen,
Die Edward angst inboez’men voor zijn leven;

MORE:

Sort=Arrange for, contrive
Pitchy=Black
Buz abroad=(or buzz) Spread, circulate
Prophecies=Rumours, predictions

Compleat:
To sort=Uitschieten, elk by ‘t zyne leggen, sorteeren
Pitchy=Pikachtig
Prophecy’d=Voorzegd, geprofiteerd

Topics: haste, revenge

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Oxford
CONTEXT:
OXFORD
I thought no less: it is his policy
To haste thus fast, to find us unprovided.
SOMERSET
But he’s deceived; we are in readiness.
QUEEN MARGARET
This cheers my heart, to see your forwardness.
OXFORD
Here pitch our battle; hence we will not budge.

DUTCH:
Ik dacht wel, dat hij snel te werk zou gaan;
Hij hoopt ons nog onvoorbereid te vinden.

MORE:

Policy=Strategem
Unprovided=Unprepared
Forwardness=Readiness
Budge=Stir, move

Compleat:
Policy (conduct, address, cunning way)=Staatkunde, beleid, behendigheid
Budge=Schudden, omroeren, beweegen
Forward=Voorbaarig, rypostig, voorlyk; Greetig; (ready or well inclined) Gereed, genegen

Topics: haste, preparation

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
I have no joy of this contract tonight.
It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden,
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say “It lightens.” Sweet, good night.

DUTCH:
k begroet u blij, maar niet
Dat wiss’len van geloften in deez’ nacht;
Dat is te snel, te plotsling, te onberaden

MORE:

Topics: relationship, caution, haste

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
O, for a horse with wings! Hear’st thou, Pisanio?
He is at Milford Haven. Read, and tell me
How far ’tis thither. If one of mean affairs
May plod it in a week, why may not I
Glide thither in a day? Then, true Pisanio,
Who long’st like me to see thy lord, who long’st—
O, let me bate—but not like me, yet long’st
But in a fainter kind—O, not like me,
For mine’s beyond beyond—say, and speak thick—
Love’s counsellor should fill the bores of hearing
To th’ smothering of the sense—how far it is
To this same blessèd Milford.

DUTCH:
O! een bevleugeld paard! — Pisanio, hoor!
Hij is in Milfordshaven; lees, en zeg me
Hoe ver dat is. Als iemand zonder haast
Het afreist in een week, zou ik dan niet
In éénen dag er komen ?


Mean affairs=Ordinary business
Bate=Deduct, abate (from what has been said)
Speak thick=Speak quickly, crowding one word on another (Also Henry IV Part 2)
Mine’s beyond beyond=Further than beyond
Bores of hearing=Ears

Compleat:
Mean=Het midden, de middelmaat; gering, slecht
To speak thick=Ras en verward spreeken
To bate=Verminderen, afkorten, afsyaan

Topics: business, status, haste

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
WESTMORELAND
What, shall we suffer this? let’s pluck him down:
My heart for anger burns; I cannot brook it.
KING HENRY VI
Be patient, gentle Earl of Westmoreland.
CLIFFORD
Patience is for poltroons, such as he:
He durst not sit there, had your father lived.
My gracious lord, here in the parliament
Let us assail the family of York.

DUTCH:
Geduld is goed voor lafaards zooals hij;
Hij zat daar niet, indien uw vader leefde.
Genadig heer, laat ons in ‘t parlement
Hier op den stam van York een aanval doen.

MORE:

Brook=Endure
Poltroons=Cowards
Assail=Attack

Compleat:
To brook=Verdraaen, uitstaan
To brook an affront=Een boon verzwelgen, een leed verkroppen
Poltron=Een fielt, bloode guit
Assail=Bespringen, aanranden

Topics: anger, patience, caution, haste

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
Methinks I am a prophet new inspired
And thus expiring do foretell of him:
His rash fierce blaze of riot cannot last,
For violent fires soon burn out themselves;
Small showers last long, but sudden storms are short;
He tires betimes that spurs too fast betimes;
With eager feeding food doth choke the feeder:
Light vanity, insatiate cormorant,
Consuming means, soon preys upon itself.

DUTCH:
Kort duurt een stortbui, zachte regens lang;
Wie vroeg te haastig spoort, is weldra moe;
Wie al te gulzig eet, hij stikt in ‘t eten;
Dwaze ijdelheid, die onverzaadbre gier,
Verslindt haar buit en aast dán op zich zelf.

MORE:

Proverb: Nothing violent can be permanent
Proverb: Untimeous [untimely] spurring spoils the steed

Expiring=(a) Dying; (b) Expiration
Riot=Dissolute behaviour
Betimes=Early, at an early hour

Compleat:
Expiration=Eindiging, uitgang, verloop, uitblaazing van den laatsten adem
To expire=Den geest geeven, sterven
To riot=Optrekken, rinkinken, pypestellen
Betimes=Bytyds,vroeg

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, fate/destiny, haste

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.4.
SPEAKER: Somerset
CONTEXT:
It is too late; I cannot send them now:
This expedition was by York and Talbot
Too rashly plotted: all our general force
Might with a sally of the very town
Be buckled with: the over-daring Talbot
Hath sullied all his gloss of former honour
By this unheedful, desperate, wild adventure:
York set him on to fight and die in shame,
That, Talbot dead, great York might bear the name

DUTCH:
Talbots overmoed
Heeft heel den glans van al zijn vroegere eer
Bevlekt door dit onzinnig dolle waagstuk.
York dreef hem aan tot strijd en roemloos sterven,
Om zelf des dooden Talbots glorie te erven.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Expedition=A warlike enterprise
Sally=An issue of troops from a besieged place
Buckled with=Join in close fight, resist
Sullied=Tarnished
The very town=The garrison

Compleat:
Expedition=Een krygsverrichting
Sally=Uitvallen
Buckle=(to buckle together) Worstelen, schermutselen
Sullied=Bemorst, vuil gemaakt, bezoedeld

Topics: haste, preparation, caution, honour, ruin, risk

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Rashly
And praised be rashness for it: let us know
Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well
When our deep plots do pall, and that should teach us
There’s a divinity that shapes our ends,
Rough-hew them how we will

DUTCH:
Er is een godheid die verkneedt en vormt, wat wij slechts ruw ontwerpen. /
Dit bewijst dat er een godheid is die vorm verleent aan wat wij ruw ontwerpen /
Er is een godsmacht, die ‘t bestek bepaalt, Hoe we ook in ‘t ruwe ons best doen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Indiscretion= Want of wisdom, want of judgment
Compleat:
To pall=Verslaan, verschaalen

Topics: caution, fate/destiny, haste

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
Upon thy certainty and confidence
What darest thou venture?
HELEN
Tax of impudence,
A strumpet’s boldness, a divulged shame
Traduced by odious ballads: my maiden’s name
Sear’d otherwise; nay, worse—if worse—extended
With vilest torture let my life be ended.
KING
Methinks in thee some blessed spirit doth speak
His powerful sound within an organ weak:
And what impossibility would slay
In common sense, sense saves another way.
Thy life is dear; for all that life can rate
Worth name of life in thee hath estimate,
Youth, beauty, wisdom, courage, all
That happiness and prime can happy call:
Thou this to hazard needs must intimate
Skill infinite or monstrous desperate.
Sweet practiser, thy physic I will try,
That ministers thine own death if I die.

DUTCH:
Waagt gij dit alles, o, uw kunst moet groot,
Onfeilbaar zijn, of driest tot in den dood .
‘k Beproef dus, lieflijke arts, uw artsenij,
Die, zoo zij mijn dood is, ook de uwe zij .

MORE:
Divulged=Exposed
Traduced=Slandered
Seared otherwise=Branded differently
Extended=Stretched (on the rack, torture)
Impossibility would slay in common sense=What common sense would not accept
Estimate=Value
Prime=Prime of life
Hazard=Risk
Intimate=Suggest
Desperate=Desperation
Practiser=Practitioner, physic
Compleat:
Divulge=Gemeen maaken, onder ‘t volk verspreyden, ruchtbaar maaken
Traduce=Overhaalen, belasteren, hekelen
To sear=Schroeijen, branden, verzengen
In his prime=In zyn eerste jeugd; in ‘t bloeijen zyner jaaren
Desperation=Wanhoop, twyfelmoedigheyd, hoopeloosheyd

Topics: haste, risk

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
And in the taste confounds the appetite.
Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so.
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

DUTCH:
Te snel komt even laat aan als te traag./
Te haastig en te traag komt even laat./
Te haastig komt even laat aan als te langzaam.

MORE:
Moderately = in moderation
‘All things in moderation’.
Compleat:
Wine is a good liquor but it must be used moderately=Wyn is een goede drank, maar by moet matigheid gebruikt worden.

Topics: still in use, time, proverbs and idioms, haste

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
The army of the queen hath got the field:
My uncles both are slain in rescuing me;
And all my followers to the eager foe
Turn back and fly, like ships before the wind
Or lambs pursued by hunger-starved wolves.
My sons, God knows what hath bechanced them:
But this I know, they have demean’d themselves
Like men born to renown by life or death.
Three times did Richard make a lane to me.
And thrice cried ‘Courage, father! fight it out!’
And full as oft came Edward to my side,
With purple falchion, painted to the hilt
In blood of those that had encounter’d him:
And when the hardiest warriors did retire,
Richard cried ‘Charge! and give no foot of ground!’
And cried ‘A crown, or else a glorious tomb!
A sceptre, or an earthly sepulchre!’
With this, we charged again: but, out, alas!
We bodged again; as I have seen a swan
With bootless labour swim against the tide
And spend her strength with over-matching waves.

DUTCH:
Wij deinsden weer, zooals ik vaak een zwaan
Vergeefs den springvloed tegenroeien zag,
Zijn kracht in de onweerstaanb’re golven spillend.

MORE:

Eager=Impetuous
Turn back=Turn their backs (run away from the enemy)
Bechanced=Happened to
Demeaned=Behaved
Make a lane=Cut a pathway to
Falchion=Curved sword
Bodge=Flinch, budge (yield, give way)
Bootless=Hopeless, futile, wasted
Overmatching=Too powerful

Compleat:
Eager=Graag, happig, greetig; heftig, vuurig, vinnig
To demean himself=Zich draagen, aanstellen
Falchion=Een klein kromachtig zwaerd, sabeltje (also fauchion)
Bootless=Te vergeefs, vruchteloos

Topics: haste, risk, failure

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Who can be wise, amazed, temp’rate, and furious,
Loyal and neutral, in a moment? No man.
Th’ expedition of my violent love
Outrun the pauser, reason.

DUTCH:
Wie is ontzet en wijs, bedaard en woedend,
Vol liefde en koud, in ‘t eigen oogenblik?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Amaze= To put in confusion, to put in a state where one does not know what to do or to say or to think
Temperate= Moderate, calm
Pauser= One who deliberates much
Compleat:
Temperate=Maatig, gemaatigd

Topics: reason, caution, haste, loyalty, uncertainty

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