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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1 ACT/SCENE: 2.3 SPEAKER: Lady Percy CONTEXT: Out, you mad-headed ape!
A weasel hath not such a deal of spleen
As you are tossed with. In faith,
I’ll know your business, Harry, that I will.
I fear my brother Mortimer doth stir
About his title, and hath sent for you
To line his enterprise; DUTCH: Och kom, wat apenfratsen!
Een wezel zelfs heeft zooveel grillen niet,
Als die ù plagen. Op mijn woord, ik wil
Uw plannen weten, Hendrik; ja, ik wil ’t.
MORE: The spleen was viewed as a a source of passion and emotion, both positive and negative.
See Cymbeline 3.4: “As quarrelous as the weasel”.
Schmidt:
Toss (metaphorically)=To throw up and down, to cause to rise and fall, to move to and fro.
To line=To fill on the inside; used for money (financial aid, support)
Enterprise= Attempt, undertaking
Compleat:
Spleen=De milt
Spleen (Spite, hatred or grudge)=Spyt, haat, wrak
Enterprise=Onderneemen, onderwinden, bestaan, aanvangen Topics: conspiracy, plans/intentions, insult, , suspicion, discovery

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
All is not well.
I doubt some foul play. Would the night were come!
Till then sit still, my soul. Foul deeds will rise,
Though all the earth o’erwhelm them, to men’s eyes.

DUTCH:
Iets is mis;
‘k Vermoed iets laags. ‘k Verlang al naar den nacht.

MORE:
Doubt=suspect
Foul deeds will rise=offences will be discovered
Said to be the first use of foul play

Compleat:
A foul copy (a copy full of insertions under erasements)=Een lordige kopy
A foul action=Een slechte daad
To play foul play=Valsch speelen, bedriegelyk speelen
Foul dealing or practices=Kwaade praktyken
Foul means=Kwaade middelen
Never seek that by foul means which thou canst get by fair=Zoekt nooit langs kwaade wegen dat gy langs de goede niet kunt verkrygen

Topics: suspicion, still in use, invented or popularised, foul play, conspiracy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Nay, this was but his dream.
OTHELLO
But this denoted a foregone conclusion.
IAGO
‘Tis a shrewd doubt, though it be but a dream.
And this may help to thicken other proofs
That do demonstrate thinly.
OTHELLO
I’ll tear her all to pieces!
IAGO
Nay, yet be wise, yet we see nothing done,
She may be honest yet. Tell me but this,
Have you not sometimes seen a handkerchief
Spotted with strawberries in your wife’s hand?

DUTCH:
En ’t kan ook andere bewijzen schragen,
die niet zo overtuigend zijn.

MORE:

Still in use: A foregone conclusion=a decision made before (‘afore’) evidence is known; or a certainty, an inevitable result.

Schmidt:
Foregone=Gone before, previous
Shrewd=Bad, evil, mischievous

Compleat:
Fore-conceived=Vooraf bevat
A fore-conceived=Voor-opgevatte waan, vooroordeel
Fore-deem=Raamen, gissen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, suspicion, reason, evidence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.7
SPEAKER: Widow
CONTEXT:
HELEN
If you misdoubt me that I am not she,
I know not how I shall assure you further,
But I shall lose the grounds I work upon.
WIDOW
Though my estate be fallen, I was well born,
Nothing acquainted with these businesses;
And would not put my reputation now
In any staining act.
HELEN
Nor would I wish you.
First, give me trust, the count he is my husband,
And what to your sworn counsel I have spoken
Is so from word to word; and then you cannot,
By the good aid that I of you shall borrow,
Err in bestowing it.

DUTCH:
Ik ben verarmd, maar toch van goeden huize,
En ben met zulke zaken niet vertrouwd,
En zou mijn goeden nnam niet willen smetten
Door iets oneerbaars .

MORE:
Misdoubt=Doubt
But I shall lose the grounds I work upon=Unless I disclose my plan
Though=Although
Estate be fallen=Fortunes have declined, fallen on hard times
Give me trust=Trust me (that)
Staining=To cause shame
Counsel=Secrecy
Compleat:
Misdoubt=’t Onrecht twyfelen
Estate=Bezit, middelen
Stain=Bevlekken, besmetten, bezwalken
Err=Dwaalen, doolen

Topics: suspicion, risk, reputation

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Thus do I ever make my fool my purse.
For I mine own gained knowledge should profane
If I would time expend with such a snipe
But for my sport and profit. I hate the Moor,
And it is thought abroad that ’twixt my sheets
He’s done my office. I know not if ’t be true,
But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,
Will do as if for surety. He holds me well.
The better shall my purpose work on him.
Cassio’s a proper man. Let me see now,

DUTCH:
Zoo moet mijn nar mij steeds als buidel dienen.
Want voor mijn groote ervaring ware ‘t schande,
Als ik met zulk een eend mijn tijd verspilde,
Zoo niet tot scherts en voordeel

MORE:

Snipe=Bird, also ‘worthless’ fellow, simpleton
Gained knowledge=Practical experience
In that kind=In that regard
‘Twixt=Betwixt (between)
Surety=Certainty
Holds me well=Respects, has a good opinion of
Purpose=Plan

Compleat:
Snipe=Snip, snep
Betwixt=Tusschen, tusschenbeide
Betwixt the devil and the red sea=Tusschen hangen en worgen
Purpose (design, resolution, project)=Voorneemen, besluit, ontwerp

Topics: money, skill/talent, age/experience, respect, suspicion

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Douglas
CONTEXT:
I fear thou art another counterfeit,
And yet, in faith, thou bear’st thee like a king.
But mine I am sure thou art, whoe’er thou be,
And thus I win thee.

DUTCH:
Ik vrees, dat gij ook weer een namaak zijt,
Schoon gij, voorwaar, u voordoet als een koning;
Doch wie gij zijt, mijn zijt gij, dit bezweer ik;
En zoo maak ik u mijn.

MORE:
Counterfeit=Deceitful imitation

Topics: deceit, conflict, insult, suspicion

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
Then meet me forthwith at the notary’s.
Give him direction for this merry bond,
And I will go and purse the ducats straight,
See to my house left in the fearful guard
Of an unthrifty knave, and presently
I will be with you.
ANTONIO
Hie thee, gentle Jew.
The Hebrew will turn Christian. He grows kind.
BASSANIO
I like not fair terms and a villain’s mind.
ANTONIO
Come on. In this there can be no dismay.
My ships come home a month before the day.

DUTCH:
k Vertrouw geen goedheid van een boos gemoed

MORE:
There can be no dismay=No cause for concern
Compleat:
Dismay=Vreeze

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Where virtue is, these are more virtuous.
Nor from mine own weak merits will I draw
The smallest fear or doubt of her revolt,
For she had eyes and chose me. No, Iago,
I’ll see before I doubt, when I doubt, prove,
And on the proof there is no more but this:
Away at once with love or jealousy!

DUTCH:
Nee, vóór ik twijfel,
wil ik eerst zien, ná twijfel eerst bewijs.
Als dat bewijs er is, is het meteen
met liefde uit en uit met jaloezie.

MORE:

Doubt=Suspicion
Revolt=Gross departure from duty; unfaithfulness

Compleat:
Revolt=Afvallen, oproerig worden, aan ‘t muiten slaan

Topics: suspicion, evidence, virtue, merit, flaw/fault, betrayal

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more.
By Sinel’s death I know I am thane of Glamis.
But how of Cawdor? The thane of Cawdor lives,
A prosperous gentleman, and to be king
Stands not within the prospect of belief,
No more than to be Cawdor. Say from whence
You owe this strange intelligence, or why
Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
With such prophetic greeting. Speak, I charge you.

DUTCH:
Spreekt, hoe gewerd u
Die wond’re wetenschap? En waarom treedt gij
Op deze barre heide ons in den weg
Met zulk een zienersgroet? Spreekt, ik bezweer u!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Intelligence=Notice, information, news
Compleat:
Intelligence=Kundschap, verstandhouding
To give intelligence=Kundschap geeven, overbrieven

Topics: fate/destiny, evidence, justification, suspicion

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Northumberland
CONTEXT:
Why, he is dead.
See what a ready tongue suspicion hath!
He that but fears the thing he would not know
Hath, by instinct, knowledge from others’ eyes
That what he feared is chancèd. Yet speak, Morton.
Tell thou an earl his divination lies,
And I will take it as a sweet disgrace
And make thee rich for doing me such wrong.
MORTON
You are too great to be by me gainsaid,
Your spirit is too true, your fears too certain.

DUTCH:
Gij zijt te groot, dan dat ik mag weerspreken;
Uw geest spelt al te waar, uw vrees te juist.

MORE:

Gainsaid=Contradicted
Divination=Prophecy
Chanced= Has come to pass, happened
Spirit=Instinct, intelligence

Schmidt:
Disgrace=Offence, ill treatment, humiliation

Compleat:
To gainsay=Tegenspreeken, Wederspreeken.
To gainsay truth=De waarheid wederspreeken of bestryden
Spirit (wit, liveliness)=Verstand, vernuft

Topics: suspicion, fate/destiny, truth

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Gertrude
CONTEXT:
To my sick soul (as sin’s true nature is)
Each toy seems prologue to some great amiss.
So full of artless jealousy is guilt,
It spills itself in fearing to be spilt.

DUTCH:
Zoo vol natuurlijke argwaan is de schuld, Onthulling vreezend, zij zichtzelf onthult. /
De reedlooze argwaan is bij schuld zoo groot, Dat met haar doodsangst schuld zich zelve doodt. /
Onze zonden slaan ons met vrees, en vrees beweegt de schuld tot zelfonthulling voor zij wordt onthuld.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Each toy= The slightest thing
Prologue= To preface
Jealousy=Suspicion
Compleat:
Jealousy (Jealoesie)(or suspicion)=Agterdogtig
Full of jealousies=Zeer agterdenkend

Topics: guilt, conscience, suspicion

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Thus do I ever make my fool my purse.
For I mine own gained knowledge should profane
If I would time expend with such a snipe
But for my sport and profit. I hate the Moor,
And it is thought abroad that ’twixt my sheets
He’s done my office. I know not if ’t be true,
But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,
Will do as if for surety. He holds me well.
The better shall my purpose work on him.
Cassio’s a proper man. Let me see now,To get his place and to plume up my will
In double knavery. How? How? Let’s see.
After some time, to abuse Othello’s ear
That he is too familiar with his wife.
He hath a person and a smooth dispose
To be suspected, framed to make women false.
The Moor is of a free and open nature
That thinks men honest that but seem to be so,
And will as tenderly be led by th’ nose
As asses are.
I have ’t. It is engendered! Hell and night
Must bring this monstrous birth to the world’s light.

DUTCH:
De Moor is gul en open van natuur,
Waant ieder eerlijk, die slechts eerlijk schijnt,
En laat zoo zachtkens bij den neus zich leiden,
Als ezels ‘t laten doen.

MORE:

Snipe=Bird, also ‘worthless’ fellow, simpleton
Gained knowledge=Practical experience
In that kind=In that regard
‘Twixt=Betwixt (between)
Surety=Certainty
Holds me well=Respects, has a good opinion of
Purpose=Plan

Compleat:
Snipe=Snip, snep
Betwixt=Tusschen, tusschenbeide
Betwixt the devil and the red sea=Tusschen hangen en worgen
Purpose (design, resolution, project)=Voorneemen, besluit, ontwerp

Topics: honesty, gullibility, trust, suspicion, respect, learning/education, age/experience, conspiracy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
I am glad of this, for now I shall have reason
To show the love and duty that I bear you
With franker spirit. Therefore, as I am bound,
Receive it from me. I speak not yet of proof.
Look to your wife, observe her well with Cassio.
Wear your eyes thus, not jealous nor secure.
I would not have your free and noble nature
Out of self-bounty be abused. Look to ’t.
I know our country disposition well.
In Venice they do let God see the pranks
They dare not show their husbands. Their best conscience
Is not to leave ’t undone, but keep’t unknown.

DUTCH:
Ik ben met onzen landaard wel vertrouwd;
Men laat bij ons den hemel treken zien,
Die de gemaal niet zien mag; ‘t reinst geweten
Zegt daar niet:laat het na”, maar: houdt verborgen.”

MORE:

Proverb: Live charily if not chastely

Secure=Free from suspicion
Self-bounty-Innate generosity
Revolt=Unfaithfulness
Best conscicence=Highest morality

Topics: love, honesty, trust, betrayal, suspicion, evidence, marriage, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
Upon my life, by some device or other
The villain is o’erraught of all my money.
They say this town is full of cozenage,
As nimble jugglers that deceive the eye,
Dark-working sorcerers that change the mind,
Soul-killing witches that deform the body,
Disguised cheaters, prating mountebanks,
And many suchlike liberties of sin.
If it prove so, I will be gone the sooner.

DUTCH:
Zoo waar ik leef, door de een of and’re streek
Is al mijn geld den kerel afgezet.
De stad is, zegt men, vol bedrog en list,
Vol beurzensnijders, die het oog bedotten,
Nachttoov’naars, die verbijst’ren, heksen, die
De ziel verdervend , ‘t lichaam tevens sloopen,
Marktschreeuwers, tal van sluw vermomde schurken,
Onnoemlijk boos, steeds zondigend geboeft;
Zoo ‘t waarheid blijkt, reis ik onmidd’lijk af.

MORE:
Device=Scheme, plot

Compleat:
Device (cunning trick)=Een listige streek
Device (invention or contrivance)=Uitvinding, vinding
Mountebank=Kwakzalver
Cozenage or Cozening=Bedrieging
To prate=Praaten. Prate and prattle=Keffen en snappen. Prate foolishly=Mal praaten
Cheater=Swindler

Burgersdijk notes:
De stad is, zegt men, vol bedrog en list. De stad Ephesus stond reeds bij de ouden bekend, als een plaats waar veel tooverkunst uitgeoefend wordt. Men vindt dit ook in de Handelingen der Apostelen vermeld, XIX, vs. 13 en 19. Dat Sh. juist daarom zijn stuk te Ephesus liet spelen, is duidelijk genoeg; men vergelijke II 2; als de gedachte aan tooverij den zoekenden Antipholus en zijn dienaar verbijstert, is het verklaarbaar, dat zij, bij al de vergissingen, niet op de gedachte komen, van nader te onderzoeken, of niet misschien juist in Ephesus hunne evenbeelden woonden.

Topics: suspicion, money, deceit

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Out, damned spot! Out, I say!—One, two. Why, then, ’tis time to do ’t. Hell is murky!—Fie, my lord, fie! A soldier, and afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account?—Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him.

DUTCH:
Wat behoeven wij te duchten, dat iemand het te weten
komt, als niemand onze macht ter verantwoording kan
roepen

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, authority, guilt, suspicion, consequence, punishment

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